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April 24, 2015
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Awards Won and the Impressions Given

:iconthejawlinereview:
TheJawlineReview Featured By Owner Apr 24, 2015
Our editor receives quite a few submissions every day and it seems like many writers like to put their strongest achievements (awards, prizes, etc. . .) in the very beginning of their submission. 

Many could say that they do this so the editor is aware that they have - for a lack of a better word - "proven" talent. 

How do you feel when you see a writer's work who has won an award? Let it be a Nobel Prize or a Daily Deviation. Any award will do. And, better yet, does it really matter if they have or have not won an award before? 

Best regards, 
TristanCody
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Devious Comments

:iconaillin1:
aillin1 Featured By Owner Edited May 3, 2015   Writer
To me, not overly much. I like works that I like. I am not entertained by awards, and neither would I hold consideration of placing it at the head of a manuscript.

The last thing I want is for my readers to have to waste moments of their lives scanning a list of awards that my books or scripts have won before getting to the actual story. An editor more so, as an editor has enough burden reading the entire thing to begin with. They have many other documents to read. Why should I bore them with awards?

It is just a waste of metal, paper or bytes anyway.
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:iconastralmelodic:
astralmelodic Featured By Owner May 3, 2015  Hobbyist Writer
I don't really care. To me, it's like judging someone by their grades in school. Art is so subjective that we can't say something is universally good or bad. I've read award winning books that everyone said were amazing and absolutely hated them.
I've also read many underrated books that I've loved so I don't feel any different knowing it has won 5477209 awards.
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:iconcding93:
CDing93 Featured By Owner May 3, 2015  Student Writer
Almost every resource I've found, online or in print, recommends to list your literary achievements. However, I agree with neurotype in that DDs and DLDs are not, in the context of the literary world, "achievements." Sure, it's nice that an admin on dA thought your piece deserved more exposure, but that's about all it amounts to
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:iconpoeticwar:
PoeticWar Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2015   Writer
This is utterly standard submission practice. It would be lovely to think that editors very attentively read every submission they receive, but the reality is that they simply can't if they're running anything beyond very small. So, yes, it's a matter of proven track-record. If the editor knows what they're doing, mention of prizes and publications can also help them work out what tradition/genre/etc the writer in question is coming from. Furthermore, it pays courtesy to those venues mentioned and provides them a minor stream of attention. 
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:iconvglory:
vglory Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2015
I would see a DD as showing their are able to make things that are popular in some way on this site, so that is relevant to mention in an immediate and concrete way--not just for being some generic "prize" showing their overall goodliness.  It is like a query to a literary mag mentioning previous publication in literary mags--it shows they know how to play that specific game and are less likely to be some delusional time-waster.
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:iconthejawlinereview:
TheJawlineReview Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2015
In a way, you could say that these awards and achievements are reassuring to both parties (writer and editor)? 
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:iconvglory:
vglory Featured By Owner Apr 30, 2015
I don't think it is generically reassuring, I think it just tells a widget shop that you know what widgets are and have made at least one fo them before.  It does not, for example, say anything about whether the author is or is not a stark raving mad diva from hell.
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Daily Deviations are features, not awards.
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:iconthejawlinereview:
TheJawlineReview Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2015
Very true. I believe in the OP I used the term "strongest achievements (awards, prizes, etc. . )" and I believe DDs are counted as achievements. At least a little bit. 
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
To be honest that seems an unrealistic outlook.
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:iconthejawlinereview:
TheJawlineReview Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2015
Honesty is always a good thing to hear. Please, if you could, explain why you think that. I'm genuinely curious. 
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
One person's opinion that an existing piece of writing deserves more exposure than it currently has does not any sort of 'achievement' make. Especially when said person doesn't even necessarily have a background in literature - I'm not the only CV/GM whose major course of study, and career, had nothing to do with it.

And, add to this that dA is somewhat of a bubble when it comes to trends in writing. Viewed from the broader context of publishing, I would absolutely not trust a dA vote of confidence to represent the potential for real-world success, even if it sometimes happens. Hell, I think there's maybe three works I featured that I would also publish as-is, but of course I'm not an editor right now.

It's gratifying, and I would certainly call it a vote of confidence, but that is as far as I would go.
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:iconthejawlinereview:
TheJawlineReview Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2015
Absolutely understandable. 

"It's gratifying, and I would certainly call it a vote of confidence, but that is as far as I would go."

That, my friend, is the answer I was seeking. Thank you. 

I like the direction you're taking this conversation as far as dA against the broader context of publishing. I believe you have tapped into a greater discussion of what exactly things like features, DDs and DLDs truly mean in regards to success. 
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
TBH, I don't think there's a greater discussion because what counts for success on dA...if you look at Popular > Literature, it is not in the slightest what appears in journals. And in terms of awards, how many people with predominantly real-world success are handing them out? Again, it doesn't mean that you're necessarily a bad writer, but in general the yardstick for print success needs to come from other print sources, and you can plug in any other descriptor there (commercial, literary, etc).
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:iconthejawlinereview:
TheJawlineReview Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2015
I believe that the greater discussion is exactly what you are saying. 

What is a DD or a feature worth in terms of real-world success? 

You're opinion (and you are more than okay to correct me if I am wrong) is that they hold little value in contrast to a more traditional form of publication. I cannot disagree with this on any level. 

Are social writing sites sandboxes for our future careers in the field of literature? Are some writers too focused on the social status of obtaining these features and losing focus on the goal as a writer (becoming published)? I find these interesting, personally. And completely understand if you do not find any further discussion in them. 

Thank you for the insight, neuro. I truly appreciate it. 
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(1 Reply)
:iconmondu:
mondu Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2015
How do you feel when you see a writer's work who has won an award?

Not, it doesn't matter whether a person won an award or not.

It tells me more about the person/group giving the award rather than the author. I mean, google up "sad puppy Hugo".
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:iconthejawlinereview:
TheJawlineReview Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2015
Now that is an interesting thought. 

To clarify, you are saying that awards do not truly represent the writer, but the group giving them - hmph. I'd love to go deeper on this idea. 

It's original. 
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:iconmondu:
mondu Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2015
All awards that do not have an objective criterion say something about the awarding body.
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:iconmythiril:
Mythiril Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Awards aren't a scale for how good a work is. Some pieces are shitty as hell but somehow got an award. 
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:iconthejawlinereview:
TheJawlineReview Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2015
Out of curiosity, do you have an example of a really bad piece that has won an award? 

If not a scale for the work, do they tell us how good the quality of the work being made by said author could be? 
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:iconmythiril:
Mythiril Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Not necessarily, I don't believe that anyway. Awards can be given for a unique concept or idea, but the writing style could be mediocre. Awards are a fancy title given to people to say 'hey, you've done something different' but doesn't necessarily reflect the quality 

And awarded pieces aren't 100% bad, but also not 100% brilliant. there is always an aspect of quality, whether it's the idea, the style, narration, etc,  just some don't deserve an award to be given to them.

A really bad piece can't win. (Though I wouldn't be surprised if there is one with an award) 
For me, I don't think LOTR is that awesome, (it's not bad , no, just not brilliant as everyone keep praising it)
Eat, pray, love as well. 
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:iconraspil:
raspil Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2015   Writer
i don't think about stuff like this.
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:iconthejawlinereview:
TheJawlineReview Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2015
Neither did our editor until this was noticed. 

It's a rather odd question because awards really take time to achieve and that means that many novice writers are simply relying on their work alone when they submit. 

I'll make it easy, though. Our submissions are not made bias by awards or achievements. Good work is good work in our eyes. 
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:iconraspil:
raspil Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2015   Writer
i'll put it this way as it pertains to me.. none of my DDs and DLDs ultimately matter.  i don't have any more or less readers, even with what i have "accomplished" here.  it's nice to be recognized and i care a lot about those who have taken their time to like/fave/read/comment/etc, but there's been no real measurable real-world benefit to a DD/DLD.  i sure as hell can't list it on a resume or use it as a talking point to get my foot in the door to publication.  i'd be laughed right out the door.

I'll make it easy, though. Our submissions are not made bias by awards or achievements. Good work is good work in our eyes.
perfect strategy is perfect
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:iconsteve-c2:
Steve-C2 Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2015
How do you feel when you see a writer's work who has won an award?
Like I picked the best apple.  Seriously, it brings a smile to my face.  Especially if I buy it before it wins the award.  I bought All the Light We Cannot See, by Anthony Doerr, about a month ago.  At the time it was a National Book Award finalist and the New York Times Book Review listed it as one of the 10 best books for 2014.  Last week, it was awarded a Pulitzer.  The Daily Deviations here have not yet let me down, either; the staff knows how to pick good reading.

Does it really matter if they have or have not won an award before?
Not really.  There are some great books out there that don't have awards.  And awards can't be given to every single great book there is.
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:iconthejawlinereview:
TheJawlineReview Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2015
The overall prestige of the award, the fact it made it through so many editors and was accepted, allows you to take pride in your decision or feel as if it is worth the time to read and see for yourself. 

Good choice, by the way! 

Could we say that awards are simply markers for good works noticed?  What do you think?
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:iconsteve-c2:
Steve-C2 Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2015
Exactly.  "I made a good decision."

And the book is a good one. :)

Could we say that awards are simply markers for noticed works?  Well, yes and no.  While not all great works are given an award, the ones that are, usually have something about them that makes them stand out from the others that were not awarded.  If I collected and read all the books on the NYT top 10 list for 2014, I'd probably find that the one which was awarded a Pulitzer stands out a bit above the others.  The award winners are definitely top of their class - although sometimes the decision of who to award is likely extremely difficult.
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:iconthejawlinereview:
TheJawlineReview Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2015
I believe you have summarized this topic very well. Thank you for the responses, Steve. They are much appreciated!
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