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October 7, 2012
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should feminism be considered when creating art?

:icondarklight436:
darklight436 Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2012
just looking at the front page, you will see many pieces that have sexy over sexualized figures of women.

if not, does that include other medias?
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:iconkyteglory:
KyteGlory Featured By Owner Oct 14, 2012
I know very well that the overabundance of hypersexualised women in media is extremely damaging. I think twice about what I draw. I make a point of drawing women with realistic proportions, wearing realistic clothing, and posing in realistic ways. I also don't very much appreciate art that fucks everything in favour of making a woman as sexy as possible. But there's a difference between not appreciating something and saying it shouldn't be allowed. Censorship doesn't really fix anything.

It would be bloody great, though, if artist would take a little responsibility, and show consideration for the impact of the shit they make. But no. Somewhere along the line it was decided that "self-expression" is to do whatever the fuck with no thought to the consequences.
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:iconzurthuryx:
Zurthuryx Featured By Owner Oct 13, 2012  Professional Writer
It all depends on the artist and their work. The women in my dark fantasy series Darkquisition are phyiscally attractive, but they're smart and strong. Why can't you have your cake and eat it too?
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:iconkdaanimefan:
KdaAnimefan Featured By Owner Oct 11, 2012  Student Writer
That would depend on the art, and the artists personal choices, it's not something to be enforced
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:iconnelchee:
nelchee Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2012  Professional General Artist
That is up to each artist to decide for himself, but it would be great if sexism was less prevalent than it is right now.
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:iconkafine:
kafine Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2012   General Artist
Yes... There's no good reason to look backwards on that issue unless you choose specifically to do so to make a point with your artwork. The feminist perspective (that women are people, not objects) really ought to be the default one and not a special thing that you sometimes do.

I also think that neglecting to consider a you know... sensible perspective of women can negatively impact your product. Too often sexualisation comes at the expense of quality and good storytelling.
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:icontrivialtales:
trivialtales Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2012  Professional General Artist
Nothing should be considered when creating art unless it's important to the art being created.
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:iconblack-allison:
Black-Allison Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2012
What actually makes something sexist is portraying one sex as unworthy of the other. Fetishism is not necessarily sexist. However wide sweeping generalization of a certain sex (eg women are naggers), treating writing or drawing of a character different according to sex (compare stances of female martial artists to males in Liefield's works) or demonizing supposed characterizations as constrained to one sex is sexist (good men cannot care about appearances, good women can't be leaders).
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:iconraerae:
raerae Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2012  Student General Artist
It is somewhat problematic, especially when women are portayed in impossible poses(the blog Eschergirls shows this pretty well), and it's also problematic for girls growing up being barraged with media like this all the time.

There is a difference between sexual objectification and being sexy. Superhero comics are a pretty good example of sexual objectification. No matter what occupation a female character is, they'll usually be dressing to display assets and posting like a model. Women are posed to please the viewer, not to clearly tell a story. Women rarely face their attacker with their FULL body, which leads to the painful boob-butt pose.

Though really, I don't have anything against fanservice other than the sheer glut of it right now.
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:iconhastsmak:
hastsmak Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2012   General Artist
No I dont think it should, art is art and putting any kind of restriction on it other than if its hurting other beings(I think its fine if you want to do some method acting and make yourself cry for photos but not to put a child through that, or to hurt animals etc)

I see many over sexualized figures of males also, I think it just tells you alot about the artist, the photographer, the model in general OR/and what their message is
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:icondarklight436:
darklight436 Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2012
do you mean actual hurting of people or animals?

what about fictional, aesthetically implied ones? wouldn't that be censorship?

I just feel that the message more than most are lost when ever you just slap a giant set of tits.
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:iconluxandnox:
luxandnox Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
Attractive people are nice to look at; you're severely misguided if you value the metaphorical resonance or social implications or art above aesthetics.
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:iconkyteglory:
KyteGlory Featured By Owner Oct 14, 2012
Taking responsibility for the social impact of one's work is misguided? And who the hell says that you can't make beautiful art that doesn't objectify the shit out of women?
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:icondarklight436:
darklight436 Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2012
I do not follow feminism, I believe in equality while still having dignified appreciation of the female form. I just feel people just using ridiculous looking figures for cheap views, not delivering a message or having artistic impact. that's all.

people should ought to put more thought into sexy model type women, However I question the extent between not being sexist and censorship, how about other forms of media, like videogames.
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:iconvineris:
Vineris Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Your audience and your message to that audience should be considered when making art. What do you want to say to the world? You can say anything you want, but that will affect who your audience is and what people think of you as an artist.
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:iconthisismyboat:
thisismyboat Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
You're assuming women drawn in a sexy way is inherently misogynist. Feminism is such a tricky and fluid ideal that you'd have to define it perfectly before putting forth the idea that all art should be feminist.

However, I don't think every piece of art needs to have a social/political ideal behind it.
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:iconpaleosonic:
Paleosonic Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Drawing sexy/over sexualized women isn't sexism. Thinking all women are that way is.
Feminism wants women to be able to choose how they want to live or what they want to wear.
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:iconsegundus:
Segundus Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2012
I'd like to downvote this comment.

No, drawings of over sexualized women IS sexism. Yes it's true that as you say feminism wants women to be able to choose how they want to live or what they want to wear, BUT that can not happen without said women suffering social consequences until we stop seeing women as nothing more than sex objects, and part of getting that done is to stop portraying women as such in popular media and art. It's not necessarily the sexy part that's bad, but the objectification hurts a great deal.
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:iconpaleosonic:
Paleosonic Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Drawings of over sexualized women don't make me personally view women differently in real life, at least I think so - but yes, I also think that some might do. Good point. Still I think that telling people what they can or can't draw is simply wrong - 'cause thats the whole point in creating art, isn't it? Creating something you like.
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:iconsegundus:
Segundus Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2012
To make it short, the human brain works in strange ways and just because you don't believe you think a certain way doesn't mean you're not. I'm not saying you specifically view women differently, I'm just pointing out you might not be aware of your own bias.

If you see a comic cover portraying a woman, try picturing her as a dude in the same pose wearing the same clothes. If what you're picturing seam ridiculous to you then chances are it was just as ridiculous before you switched the gender of the character and you just didn't notice it. Female characters being portrayed in unhealthy ways has become so normal to most people that they notice it.

I never tried to tell anyone what they should be allowed to draw thought, but I really recommend being aware of what kind of messages you wish the audience to receive from your work both consciously and subconsciously. A constant stream of art that portrays women as sex object usually does mess with peoples view of women.
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:iconpaleosonic:
Paleosonic Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Okay, I approve, though I don't think that you can change much about how people often portray women - at least not in a short time span.
Still I dont think it's "unhealthy", as you said, to portray women (or men) in over sexualized ways, only if really many people do it it affects the common view on women negatively.
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:iconsegundus:
Segundus Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2012
I agree, change does not happen over night, only if we continue to speak up about what's wrong with society then slowly but surely it will happen.

When I say it's "unhealthy" I mean it's damaging to girls' and women's view of their own sexuality and body if the media around them constantly portray it as a positive thing that the female body is primarily there for the visual pleasure of men. The thing is, I do think the over sexuallization and objectification of women do happen far to often,especially in some industries like comic books, and as you said that affects the common view on women negatively.

We need to differentiate between a character that happens to be sexy, (like Faith from Mirror's Edge [link]) and a characters who's body is being portrayed by the artist in a way that is sexually objectifying. [link] (and happens to be anatomically impossible most of the time)
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:iconpaleosonic:
Paleosonic Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks for enlightening me :)
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:iconsegundus:
Segundus Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2012
You're welcome. Thanks for listening:)
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:iconhexterian:
Hexterian Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2012  Student
It would be nice, but there's always that "sex sells" mindset, and while people are realizing media's focusing too much on bouncing titties they just can't seem to get enough of said bags of fat.

They'll probably keep it up until a huge part of the public decides they're bored of it, which realistically speaking just doesn't look like it'd happen. Ever.
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:iconstarlit-sorceress:
Starlit-Sorceress Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
I heard somewhere that 80% of the subjects in paintings in a major art museum were female. Less than 20% of the artists were, though.

It sounds like your answer to "should feminism be considered?" is yes, and I agree with you.

I really enjoy the tumblr blog, "Escher Girls" [link]

It's dedicated to making fun of anatomy fails that media artists make (comics/games/etc) while trying to over-sexualize the women they draw.

Fun fact: Did you know that a real woman cannot swivel her waist far enough to show off her whole chest and backside at the same time?
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