Shop Forum More Submit  Join Login

Details

Closed to new replies
January 13, 2008
Link

Statistics

Replies: 30

Any Advice On How To Digitally Color Art With Photoshop?

:iconmizumiblu:
Mizumiblu Featured By Owner Jan 13, 2008
I know people have already asked this question so many times in the past but, sadly, I haven't seen any recent post in the forum. I hate asking, but I've seen such beautiful artwork done digitally, and I really want to learn. I have Photoshop CS2 but I've only used it to play around with photos. So is there anyone out there that can offer help?
Reply

You can no longer comment on this thread as it was closed due to no activity for a month.

Devious Comments

:iconhesir:
hesir Featured By Owner Feb 26, 2008  Professional General Artist
Hi,

The simplest advise I can give is scan your line work in (pencil or ink - light pencils can always be boosted/darkened a little using the Image/Adjustment/Curve tool).

Copy your line-work layer and set it as the upper layer, changing the "normal" property tab at the top of your layers box to "multiply" - this will allow you to see the layer(s) directly below it through your line-work.

Then simply create several new layers below this on which to colour the image. I tend to use one layer for skin, one for fabrics, and another for hard surfaces like armour etc. But use as many as you feel comfortable with (and don't forget to name them - anything over ten layers starts to get confusing and frustrating otherwise).

Good luck.

h.
Reply
:iconmizumiblu:
Mizumiblu Featured By Owner Feb 26, 2008
thanks so much for taking the time out to give me your advice. It was really easy to understand and will be very helpful! :D
Reply
:iconhesir:
hesir Featured By Owner Feb 27, 2008  Professional General Artist
No problem.

There are a number of different approaches but that method has worked for me with both inks (eg. [link] ) and sketched pencils (eg. [link] ). Its always worth flipping through the magazine rack at the newsagent to see if there are any valuable tutorials on other methods too, and maybe signing up to a site like CGTalk, which has some great tutorials on there.

h.
Reply
:iconmizumiblu:
Mizumiblu Featured By Owner Feb 27, 2008
Wow, your work is awesome! :D I think that method is the easiest to understand and a good start. I can always explore and learn beyond that later. Again, thank you so much for your time and the additional advice that you've given.
Reply
:iconhesir:
hesir Featured By Owner Feb 28, 2008  Professional General Artist
Glad I could help.

h.
Reply
:iconjhubert:
jhubert Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2008  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Some of these tutorials might help.
Reply
:iconmizumiblu:
Mizumiblu Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2008
^^ thanks a bunch!
Reply
:iconelitha:
Elitha Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2008
Well.. there really isn't a way to explain how to paint digitally. It's kind of like explaining how to draw. If you want to learn, all you need is to study and practice. Look at other people's work, and try to gather information from them. Also, a few pointers:
-don't use black or white (especially if you're aiming for realism) because it will deaden your image
-don't overuse the smudge and blur tools, and try to stay away from filters
-get a tablet if you don't own one. It will become your best friend
-remember that color is reflective so be sure to incorporate that into your artwork

And have fun with it:)
Reply
:iconmizumiblu:
Mizumiblu Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2008
Thank you so much for the advice! I appreciate it.
Reply
:iconelitha:
Elitha Featured By Owner Feb 18, 2008
:hug:
Reply
:icontelophase:
telophase Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2008  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Resist the idea of using the Smudge tool to blend. Instead, think in a more painterly fashion: use a soft brush with the opacity turned down low, and layer strokes over each other to build up the color.

Blending two colors next to each other can be done by using the same low-opacity brush and stroking one color over the other. Use the eyedropper tool to pick up the new color formed by doing so, and stroke it back into the original color. Keep doing that, and you'll eventually blend the two.
Reply
:iconmizumiblu:
Mizumiblu Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2008
Oh wow, I'm so glad you've told me that, because I have this thing for the smudge tool. lol So thanks for the heads up. :D
Reply
:icontelophase:
telophase Featured By Owner Jan 16, 2008  Hobbyist Digital Artist
It's good in small areas, but in larger areas it ends up with a distinct "Photoshop Smudge Tool!" look. :D I'm sure there's people out there who've figured out how to use it without getting that look, but they're few and far between. :)
Reply
:iconuchiha-tracker:
Uchiha-Tracker Featured By Owner Feb 20, 2008
That's actualy easy to avoid. You just wiggle the brush back and forth along the seams with a soft brush, and do it again if you get more lines. It dosen't look all that bad when you know how to use it. Just don't use those big swirling motions, that's when it loks bad.

I was doing that here on his face. :thumb69576254: That didn't turn out well ^^;
Reply
:icontelophase:
telophase Featured By Owner Feb 25, 2008  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Or you could just learn to paint, which is just as easy, and save the smudge for small touch-ups. :)
Reply
:iconuchiha-tracker:
Uchiha-Tracker Featured By Owner Feb 26, 2008
Yes, but painting suplies cost money. I'd reather be cheep and use photoshop. :D
Reply
:icontelophase:
telophase Featured By Owner Feb 28, 2008  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Perhaps I'll make myself a bit more clear: learn to paint digitally Use painting techniques, instead of digital-only techniques like smudging. They're more versatile, and they extend farther: you can use them in all manner of CG programs, instead of being stuck with one that's proprietary like Photoshop's Smudge is, and one day, when you pick up real media, you'll already know some of the technique and won't be starting from scratch.

Or you could just use Smudge and limit yourself. Up to you.
Reply
:iconuchiha-tracker:
Uchiha-Tracker Featured By Owner Feb 28, 2008
I wouldn't call it limiting :|
Reply
(1 Reply)
:iconmizumiblu:
Mizumiblu Featured By Owner Jan 16, 2008
After seeing your artwork, I'll take your word for it. You're awesome! :D
Reply
:icontelophase:
telophase Featured By Owner Jan 16, 2008  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thank you! :XD:

After I work out the kinks on this latest realism-type style that I seem to have figured out, I'll probably attempt to make a tutorial. No telling if I'll be able to explain what I do. XD
Reply
:iconmizumiblu:
Mizumiblu Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2008
You're welcome!

Oh and I totally understand about explaining. I hate it when I have to explain stuff. I do my own problem-solving in my head as I work so often times, I'm going to be the only one who'll truly understand what I'm doing. Try voicing that out and it sounds silly and confusing---even to me. lol I'm sure that's a similar problem.

I'm sure a lot of people would appreciate it if you did try. I know I would :D
Reply
:iconxiuhtecuhtli:
Xiuhtecuhtli Featured By Owner Jan 13, 2008
Brush tool, and layers are your friends. Layers, and lot's of them, tablet.
Reply
:iconmizumiblu:
Mizumiblu Featured By Owner Jan 14, 2008
Thank you. Layers might give me trouble but its all about hands on and learning.
Reply
:iconxiuhtecuhtli:
Xiuhtecuhtli Featured By Owner Jan 14, 2008
Yeah trust me when you images start getting detailed you'll fall in love with layers, if you worry about forgetting which is which just label them. :)
Reply
:iconmizumiblu:
Mizumiblu Featured By Owner Jan 14, 2008
Understood. :D Mind if I poke you for more tips when necessary?
Reply
:iconxiuhtecuhtli:
Xiuhtecuhtli Featured By Owner Jan 14, 2008
No problem feel free to ask me. :)
Reply
:iconmizumiblu:
Mizumiblu Featured By Owner Jan 14, 2008
thanks so much!
Reply
:iconxiuhtecuhtli:
Xiuhtecuhtli Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2008
You're welcome!
Reply
Add a Comment: