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December 9, 2012
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Dual boot a Mac OSX on a Linux Machine?

:iconjohnnydwicked:
johnnydwicked Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2012  Professional Filmographer
I've searched for tutorials on how to dual boot Mac OSX 10.8 on a Linux Mint 13 Machine (originally Windows 7) but it's always how to boot linux on a Mac. I wanted it the other way around but could find tutorials. So I was wondering any help? I want Mac on PC powered by Linux.

Also, FYI, I don't have a Mac so I can't use a Mac OSX to create the boot. But I already have the OSX disc, just wondering how do I install that on a Linux Mint PC to dual boot it.
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Devious Comments

:icondelusionalhamster:
delusionalHamster Featured By Owner Dec 15, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
You can just use Darling now

[link]
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:iconworkoutprogress:
workoutprogress Featured By Owner Dec 15, 2012   Photographer
Dunno if this is answered yet but linux has bootloaders other than bootcamp, have you checked out lilo or grub and starting with linux for the install rather than the other way around?
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:iconpyrohmstr:
pyrohmstr Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2012  Professional Artist
Linux usually runs pretty light... perhaps run OSX over it in a VM?
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:iconpakaku:
Pakaku Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2012
What do you need OS X for?

If anything, you'll probably want to look at the hackintosh community...
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:iconpr-imagery:
PR-Imagery Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Would help to know what computer your using, it is quite simple with a SB/IB based computer tho.
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:iconjohnnydwicked:
johnnydwicked Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2012  Professional Filmographer
Core 2 duo 2.4ghz, 8gb Ram, 250 gb hdd, and geforce 9600gt.
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:iconpr-imagery:
PR-Imagery Featured By Owner Dec 10, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Best guides out there.

[link]
or
[link]
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:iconzipper-1:
Zipper-1 Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2012  Professional Filmographer
I tell you what, read this article for yourself and make your decision. I strongly advise against it because of the instability of the system, but it's your choice, this article should help. [link]
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:iconzipper-1:
Zipper-1 Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2012  Professional Filmographer
It's best you avoid that Johnny, it's not supported and illegitimate, not to mention. Hacking a machine can only turn out for the worst if you're unsure of what exactly you're doing. You really don't want to risk your computer on bad software and a hack. It could open you up to viruses galore, not to mention you're accessing vital parts of the system software and that's never a good idea unless you're an expert programmer. Honestly, programming is a little over even my head, and I know computers pretty well, at least hardware wise and most software up to programming, which is about the only gray area for me.
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:iconscnal:
Scnal Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
It's worth pointing out that as well, no hardware could become harmed through installing an OS itself. The computer itself would remain fully functional. If it works, then perfect. If it doesn't work, then all it takes is removing the OS from your hard drive and you're absolutely fine again (nothing's permanently changed is the point). As a programmer who's personally installed plenty of OSes in my free time, and I have a decent understanding of them, I can say that none of your claims apply, there wouldn't be any more viruses than on a regular mac, the accessing low level software really doesn't matter and isn't even on the client's end (that is to say, Johnny wouldn't ever need to deal with any of it), and it's a good idea for anyone interested.
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:iconzipper-1:
Zipper-1 Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2012  Professional Filmographer
In most cases, but this is something that isn't originally designed to run n a Windows or Linux machine. It's different when installing Windows on a Mac, which is legitimately possible, but the other way around just doesn't work for good reason. It wasn't created to work and is punishable by law, in actuality. It's no different than piracy, you're running a system on a machine it wasn't specified to be booted on and that's violating the law. It's a bad idea and can have negative repercussions, especially if it voids the warranty or has legal repercussions.
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:iconscnal:
Scnal Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
That fact is irrelevant if it does run. It's still irrelevant even if it doesn't. It can work, I know that my computer is set up to handle it, and it is not punishable by law. Please don't tell me you're considering the illegal obtaining of computer programs and data with running an OS on a computer that the OS wasn't made to run on as the same thing. As I've said before, nothing negative can come of it, no warranties are voided, and there are no legal repercussions. It's a common practice to run a hackintosh, actually, and I've never seen one problem beyond it not running on the computer.
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:iconzipper-1:
Zipper-1 Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2012  Professional Filmographer
Of course not, but it is in fact a violation of Apple's policies and could place you in legal trouble, though I've scarcely seen an individual user sued by a corporate entity, you never know with a company as sue happy as Apple.
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:iconscnal:
Scnal Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Eh, Apple mainly goes for the bigger targets anyway, not some guy who wants to use OSX on a computer that isn't a mac.
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:icondelusionalhamster:
delusionalHamster Featured By Owner Dec 10, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Goes for the bigger targets, eh...?

[link]

[link]

[link]
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:iconscnal:
Scnal Featured By Owner Dec 10, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
First one; he was selling parts he got manufactured in China. Sure, he's no multinational corporation, but he's not exactly a small target either.

Second one; Read Scott Smith's comment. It's worth reading rick and steve's comments (note, the steve that specifically said he's not the same steve as the one before him).

Third one; He leaked information.
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:iconzipper-1:
Zipper-1 Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2012  Professional Filmographer
That's true, but like I said, those bigger companies will kick your warranty out the window for stuff like that, simply because they don't want a lawsuit from apple for ignoring it. Single users Apple isn't going to go after, but Dell, Hp and so on are susceptible to a lawsuit, which is why they do void warranties for unauthorized operating systems. It's all the legal BS that companies propagate and while most of it is seemingly dumb, they're just protecting their bread and butter.
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:iconscnal:
Scnal Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
[link] This'd be your best bet, and a lot of it is hoping your hardware is supported.
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:iconzipper-1:
Zipper-1 Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2012  Professional Filmographer
Unfortunately, that's impossible unless you want to hack the BIOS and altering that can yield some very serious side effects. I'm a little lost on the software side but I do know that Apple doesn't allow for it's software to be bootable on any other computer but a Mac. It's a little strict as a rule, but the only other way I can figure it working is if you build the computer yourself using a motherboard with Apple BIOS on it.
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:icondarue:
darue Featured By Owner Dec 15, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
You wouldn't need to hack BIOS at all, only change a few settings.

If it doesn't pan out, it's all of a few minutes to change those settings back, and doing so poses no risk. Apple doesn't condone installation of their OS on other computers; it's certainly allowed. They just won't help you if you can't get it to work.

What you're thinking of is mostly the PowerPC days of old when Apple used more of a "fenced garden" of hardware and optimized their OS specifically that hardware set, but since their move out of that it's not only easy but almost trivial to pop in an OSX disk and have it working.
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:iconzipper-1:
Zipper-1 Featured By Owner Dec 15, 2012  Professional Filmographer
I think I had it confused with the PowerPC days when you needed to change settings in the BIOS to run Mac on a PC.

Actually, Apple prohibits the installation of OSX on any other machine, it's in the terms and conditions if you actually read them in the software.

Could be, I haven't really kept up much with PC's these days ever since I got my Macs about 3 years ago. The way I hear, they're thinking of going back to making their own processors again for Apple. I know they did it for the ipad and iphone as well, rumor is the computers are next, but it isn't 100% yet.
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:icondarue:
darue Featured By Owner Dec 15, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Ah, I see.

Terms and Conditions have always confused me in that regard, actually. Are there any laws that make it punishable to go against ToC of any product? I always thought it was to prevent liabilities for damage when a product is used in a way not originally intended. i.e. You can't sue Apple if your FrankenMac loses valuable files.
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:iconzipper-1:
Zipper-1 Featured By Owner Dec 15, 2012  Professional Filmographer
Actually, the TOC is a legal, binding contract, so violating it is illegal already, BUT Apple is just going to up and sue some Joe Schmoe, they only take other companies to court because they know they'll get their money. It is for that reason Dell, HP or any other PC company will consider your warranty void if you have a hack version of OSX installed on your Windows machine. They don't want to be sued for the liability, so they refuse to honor any active warranty if you are found to be using OSX on that machine. Other than that, it's like downloading software illegally, you're most likely not going to go to prison or get sued for it, but the people pirating will if found and prosecuted.
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:iconpr-imagery:
PR-Imagery Featured By Owner Dec 16, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
EULA agreements actually hold very little weight in court.

If you can install OSx on a computer without hacking any OS files (which you can) you're not doing anything illegal.
The most Apple can do is deny you support...
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:iconzipper-1:
Zipper-1 Featured By Owner Dec 16, 2012  Professional Filmographer
That's true, but they hold volumes of weight against other companies, especially when copyrights are brought in, which voids the warranty on the windows machine. Overall, not recommended.
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:iconscnal:
Scnal Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
It is very possible. There's even a term for it, "hackintosh".
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:iconzipper-1:
Zipper-1 Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2012  Professional Filmographer
Yes, that's what I meant by accessing the BIOS but it's very unstable and can actually be harmful to the computer. I strongly suggest not using a Hackintosh. They can't even update the software.
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:iconscnal:
Scnal Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Beyond the boot process and changing around a few options, you wouldn't ever need to go into the BIOS. And even then nothing you're doing there is harmful, just disabling a few things that macs can't use.
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:iconzipper-1:
Zipper-1 Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2012  Professional Filmographer
Changing anything in the system is dangerous, not to mention foolish. If a machine isn't meant to run certain software, there's a reason. It's like ripping parts out of an engine when you're not a mechanic, you're not meant to do it. It could also void his warranty, if he still has one.
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:iconscnal:
Scnal Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
As someone who changes things in the system for fun, I can tell you that's not correct. I've fixed computers by working in the BIOS, but I have yet to ever mess anything up. Now, Apple just doesn't want people to run their OS on computers that aren't sold by them because, well, it's not sold by them. Beyond them not trying to make mac OSX specifically work with all hardware, there's nothing actually stopping you from doing it. Installing an operating system on a computer doesn't void any warranty, and in the very unlikely case that it does then he'd have already broken it when he installed linux. And if he can install linux, he should be able to install OSX.
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:iconzipper-1:
Zipper-1 Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2012  Professional Filmographer
I can also site many cases where users of a hackintosh crashed their system. But that's besides the point. It's illegal and yes, it will void the warranty because running a system it isn't meant to run counts as tampering. Dozens of computer techs will tell you that installing a foreign system, such as one that isn't meant to run on that machine by default voids the warranty. It's more of a legal matter and usually only applies with OSX, which cannot be installed on a PC legitimately or safely.
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:iconscnal:
Scnal Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Crashing, in this case, is not harmful. Illegal, sure, but that's just piracy (or as Johnny said he has a mac OSX install disc, so possibly not even), and there is no warrantly loss for running a new OS on a computer, computers aremeant to run OSes, and that counts mac on non-mac computers too. That's just false, coming from a computer hobbyist, installing pirated software, while illegal, voids no warranty, and is easy to remove without a trace anyway (so no one would even have to know, let alone void your warranty for it). It is very safe.
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