Shop Mobile More Submit  Join Login

Details

Closed to new replies
November 15, 2012
Link

Statistics

Replies: 43

Help please,I want to start learning 2d or 3d animation, may i ask where should i began?

:iconciaroclg:
ciaroclg Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2012  Professional Writer
Hello everyone my name is christian, and im lookin g forward to learning 2d and 3d animation,may i ask where do you all think i should begin.
I have an laptop i mostly use, but i also have an desktop. I also have an wacom tablet, im not the ebst artist but im willing to learn. what books,software,hardware would i need to start off? I want to one day get to where i can create anime, or do 3d designs,over time. But first id like to learn the basics,what software,book,should i start off with?flash?blender?
Any responces would be very helpful.thank you again.
Reply

You can no longer comment on this thread as it was closed due to no activity for a month.

Devious Comments

:icontiffa:
tiffa Featured By Owner Dec 3, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
As already mentioned, the best place to start is your drawing skills. Life drawing. Lots of it.. 2 hours per session doing 30 second gestures LOL (omg how we got slammed with this in animation school). Looking at photographs isn't the same as working from a live model. What these gestures teach you is this: proportion, anatomy, movement, foreshortening, perspective

These are the foundations of 2D animation. Being able to quickly reproduce a drawing with the same proportions. Maintaining mass is probably one of the trickiest parts of 2D animation. It requires a hella lot of flipping and refining and an eye for continuity errors.

Squash and stretch is a good principle to understand also.

These days, the majority of animation is cut-out 2D animation an 3D animation. It's beneficial to understand the foundation of classical animation to be able to apply the most eye-pleasing way to make something move. Animation in general uses a lot of exaggerated movements to communicate what's going on to the audience.

It's been so long since I've studied it myself. I do recall my life drawing instructors highly recommending Hogarth's books for anatomy studies. I'm afraid I can't make additional suggestions to what's already been said.

These pretty much apply to 3D animation as well. Except the drawing part.. it's pretty much manipulating a puppet. Cut-out 2D animation is kidna the same if you're using skeletons.Anyhoo, good luck and don't give up! Animating is some pretty intensive labour....
Reply
:iconciaroclg:
ciaroclg Featured By Owner Dec 12, 2012  Professional Writer
Im sorry for the late response been so busy,thank you so so much for your advice,
Reply
:icontiffa:
tiffa Featured By Owner Dec 13, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
np! Good luck with animation!
Reply
:iconciaroclg:
ciaroclg Featured By Owner Dec 13, 2012  Professional Writer
thankk you. starting with basics.
Reply
:iconmooingmoe:
MooingMoe Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I do many 2D animations and heres a list of tips:

UNO. Take the time to be able to do flip books and stuff, they teach you patience and pacing. You don't need fancy bound paper. I used my english books since we never had to give them back. Of course almost any book will do.

DOS. Take time to learn about color, people are more pink then they are yellow and putting someone in a dark room will make them kinda yellow, or if they are in a dark place looking at a phone, a blue/purple light will shine on them. Theire is many great stuff on deviant art about it.

TRES. Get the animation book by Kit Layborne. This book is very 90's style, but it gives you great ideas and uses actualy animation examples. Plus it shows lots of different types. It is what got me into stop motion animation. But it talks about round-abouts for characters, to the different types of walk styles. It has stuf on storyboarding and cameras..

QUATRO. Buy books about different types of styles of art. Christopher Hart has hands down best books on manga. Plus you can find him here on DA. For more comic types- stan lee has a few books. The better thing about stan Lee is that he is big in the buissness. Who has not heard of spiderman? Plus what I like about his books is he also talks about the back end of things too. Since every animation has characters- character mentor by Tom bancroft is good. Art books will only do good and make it easier to go back to basics.

CINCO. I stress the importance of backgrounds. DOO ITT, Even if it is a bunch of gray smears, its better than nothing!

CES. Every animation is a story, so read up on writting and dialouge. A good how to guide is here: [link]

Now, I wish you luck!
Reply
:iconciaroclg:
ciaroclg Featured By Owner Dec 13, 2012  Professional Writer
thank you so so much
Reply
:iconslippymagnus:
SlippyMagnus Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Get nice and cozy with Sai-Paint tool, Adobe Flash CS4, and Wireframing.

These are gonna be your basic toolkist for doing that. (I'm trying to do what you're trying to do too!)

Here are some Google'd sources.
[link]
[link]
Reply
:iconciaroclg:
ciaroclg Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2012  Professional Writer
will that flash program work with windows 8? Thank you so much for your kindness,it truly means alot.
Reply
:iconslippymagnus:
SlippyMagnus Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I understand the want for an actual answer.
I'm following in similar footsteps.

CS4 should work fine, if not a bit choppily on there.
I dunno where you'd find a wireframing program, but I'd like to see it, if YOU know!
Reply
:iconhmontes:
HMontes Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012  Professional General Artist
By "wireframing" do you mean a 3D modeling program? There a few free ones out there that I know of.
Reply
:iconslippymagnus:
SlippyMagnus Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I did mean that. Sorry if I'm bad with the lingo ^^;

Would you be able to send me some? It would be appreciated!
Reply
:iconhmontes:
HMontes Featured By Owner Nov 29, 2012  Professional General Artist
Here are the freeware 3D modeling programs I know of and have tried:

Hexagon by Daz3D. This is a very powerful modeler thought the interface takes some getting used to. You will have to register with the Daz3D site to get the license for the free program.

[link]

Albatross 3D - A rather good basic modeler with animation capabilities. [link]

Wings3D - Another basic modeler. [link]

Art Of Illusion - This one requires installing Java. [link]

Blender - Everyone knows about this powerful modeler/animation program. [link]

And finally my personal favorite, with an easy to learn interface and a good one to start with:

Metasequoia - Freeware version has some limitations in file formats. The full version in shareware mode can do more and costs around $35 to register. [link]
Reply
:iconhmontes:
HMontes Featured By Owner Nov 29, 2012  Professional General Artist
Excuse some of the bad grammar. The coffee hasn't kicked in yet.
Reply
:iconciaroclg:
ciaroclg Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2012  Professional Writer
sadly i dont know but ill look around-)
Reply
:iconslippymagnus:
SlippyMagnus Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Alert me if anything comes up!

Please and Thank you!
Reply
:iconciaroclg:
ciaroclg Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2012  Professional Writer
Your very welcome,=) and i sure will.
Reply
:iconckdreamer:
CKDreamer Featured By Owner Nov 19, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Animation is the art of timing, so on top of working on your anatomy/drawing skills, then looking up references for the timing of how long something takes is important, like a yawn would averagely stretch out three seconds. 3D animation would seem to be easier but learning 2d and drawing the animations out yourself is probably a better way to start, since later in 3d you'll be thumbing your pose to pose. btw for 3D animation I use maya, it's pretty simple. 3D modeling is a bit rougher, but that's a whole nother page XD
for 2D animation you can use photoshop,flash, & there's one i can't remember right now, that's ever more simple and basic, and really good T_T.
P.s I loath life drawing class, second semester around and it's still so painful 2 and a half hours of DRAW DRAW GOGO FASTER FASTER.
Sigh,

:D your friendly animation student,
Lily
Reply
:iconciaroclg:
ciaroclg Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2012  Professional Writer
Thank youu so much lily, it truly means alot, i will take all that you told me and make you all proud.=)
Reply
:iconhmontes:
HMontes Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Professional General Artist
I looked at your gallery. If what you have there is an example of your skill then you need to practice the basics first before attempting animation. In his Animator's Survival Kit book, Richard Williams does stress a strong grounding in good drawing skills. Start out with books on figure drawing and anatomy. I found going to life drawing classes held at the local art league really helped me. And good drawing ability does not happen overnight. It takes practice and lots of it.
Reply
:iconciaroclg:
ciaroclg Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2012  Professional Writer
True im not the ebst artist, thank you for your critique and wisdom.=) Ill watch you.
Reply
:iconhmontes:
HMontes Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2012  Professional General Artist
Thank you. I started with the traditional route. Animating on paper and shooting it on film. Computers did make the process easier though it introduced their own complications. I'm also learning 3D modeling and animation. Having a knowledge of drawing does help because you have to visualize in 3 dimensions.

There is a some free animation software out there. But I started with Toon Boom Studio because it came close to a traditional workflow. It's vector based. For raster based I'm thinking of adding Digicel Flipbook.

I have several 3D programs I'm learning with but the most easiest and fun one is Metasequoia. There is a freeware version of it. I wish you luck with your endeavors and future success.
Reply
:iconciaroclg:
ciaroclg Featured By Owner Nov 19, 2012  Professional Writer
Thank you so so much=)
Reply
:iconmortualia:
Mortualia Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
yep, the animator survival kit is a really great book, got it too, because i wanted to start animating.

I just can recommend this book!
Reply
:iconciaroclg:
ciaroclg Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2012  Professional Writer
Thank youuu, ill watch you.
Reply
:iconmortualia:
Mortualia Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
:D ou... thank you!
Reply
:iconciaroclg:
ciaroclg Featured By Owner Nov 19, 2012  Professional Writer
=) yw
Reply
:iconblack-chimaera:
Black-Chimaera Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2012  Professional Filmographer
Blender is great, might be confusing at first. Ok, a lot of confusion ahead, but it's great. Sculptris is fun to sculpt with, allows you to create a character without the usual bevel-extrude path.

Book, well, Richard Williams The Animator Survival Kit, really helpful.

Polugon count and general workability are going to depend on your machine. For Sculpting in Sculptris a recent middle class desktop with dedicated graphics is going to get you close to the million poly count, where my four years old laptop only reaches 100k. But to animate, normally in class we kept our models below 30k to make it possible to animate for the machine.
Reply
:iconciaroclg:
ciaroclg Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2012  Professional Writer
Blender is interesting, and thank you so so much
Reply
:iconthewalkingghost:
TheWalkingGhost Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2012  Hobbyist Filmographer
Okayyyyyy.... So... I'm gonna do a memory dump and throw down all I can think of right now...

I just finished studying an Advanced Diploma of screen and Media, specialising in 2D animation.\

Some good books for animation, specialising in 2D, however it is still relevant for all forms of animation.

Preston Blair's work is fantastic: [link]
and Richard Williams is a god to me: [link]

For 2D animation I preferably work in Photoshop/Painter, however Flash is also fantastic.
You can get 30 day trials from the adobe website.

For 3D modelling and animation I use Autodesk Maya and 3DS Max, however you can learn using Blender and Sculptris.

If I were you I'd try and start 2D first, atleast for a few weeks so you can understand animation. Do the old school "bouncing ball" tutorials and practice walk cycles.
Then move to 3D, or atleast practice modelling and then go to animation.

As for hardware, I use Windows computers, I'm not all that keen on Mac due to the one's at my uni crashing a lot when using Maya/After Effects.
Overall, they're computers, they all crash and the likes.
Reply
:iconciaroclg:
ciaroclg Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2012  Professional Writer
Thank you so so much, ill watch you. And ill look into everything you said.
Reply
:iconkaigapen:
Kaigapen Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2012
I hear Blender is rather decent to good for 3D animation, and Pencil is a free 2D animating program. Maya is pretty handy, though a bit moody, for 3D animation as well - if you're student, you might be able to register for the free student version of Maya here: [link]

With 2D animation, and this is just something I personally find rather helpful but I find pixel art rather helpful for understanding frame-animation and helps build the patience.

Here's something that might be helpful, or at least interesting to look at: [link]
Reply
:iconciaroclg:
ciaroclg Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2012  Professional Writer
*hugs* Thank you guardiiiannn so much,how are you?
Reply
:iconkaigapen:
Kaigapen Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2012
//hugs// no problem~ And I'm... doing relatively okay haha. Much better than before, at least. Thinking of finally get my butt off of hiatus and make a full return. How about you? Hopefully things have been going well!
Reply
:iconciaroclg:
ciaroclg Featured By Owner Nov 19, 2012  Professional Writer
GOOD, cant wait to see your full return. Im doing well,planning and creating.hard work i tell ya.
Reply
:iconkaigapen:
Kaigapen Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2012
Haha, creating and planning are always hard work - but in the end I'd like to think it's all worth it.
Reply
:iconciaroclg:
ciaroclg Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2012  Professional Writer
thank you i know, deciding if i should jsut got the traditional rout and scan everything in then go forward..or...
Reply
:iconkaigapen:
Kaigapen Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2012
I would say go traditional first since that would be the quickest and most effective way of figuring out the base of your style before going digital - though it wouldn't hurt at all to get a bit of Digital practice in here and there.
Reply
:iconciaroclg:
ciaroclg Featured By Owner Dec 12, 2012  Professional Writer
thank youuu
Reply
(1 Reply)
:iconpakaku:
Pakaku Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2012
Pencil.app
Reply
:iconciaroclg:
ciaroclg Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2012  Professional Writer
thank youuuu,ill look that up.
Reply
Add a Comment: