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December 30, 2012
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Anyone read/reading Escape from Furnace?

:iconsweettalker101:
SweetTalker101 Featured By Owner Dec 29, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
IF so then I just want to rant a little bit about the book. I haven't finished reading it yet, I'm about halfway through it. I'm a girl and I didn't realize while purchasing it, it would be such a BOY BOOK! Ok that doesn't bother me too much, I mean I've read the Maze Runner series and that had mostly all male main characters. So yeah besides the lack of females, I love the setting of the book. Furnace seems pretty awesomely terrifying. The one thing, as a reader and a writer, that I CANNOT stand though, is the fact that I have no idea what these main characters look like. I get bare scraps of physical descriptions about the characters. For example Monty is fat and Donovan is tall and built. But what about their hair color??!!! Seriously, I think I learned the warden's hair color and I still don't know Alex's. Like the author couldn't have just slipped that into one of the shower scenes at some point. COME ON!! I have no way of picturing Alex in my mind as I read the book if I have no idea what he looks like. The author goes through all the trouble of giving these great scene descriptions and detailed descriptions of the dogs and the weezers and yet he can't spare a paragraph on his main character? I'm sorry but this is pissing me off a little. Maybe it's because this is a boy's book mostly and he figures the guys won't care about the small things like this and all they want is ACTION ACTION ACTION, but as a reader of the other sex, please add a little physical description. Ok...my rant is over. Tell me if you agree/disagree or whatever.
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:iconbrennanba:
BrennanBA Featured By Owner Dec 30, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I remember reading Jeeves and Wooster once, there's a whole series of novels about them, and the character Jeeves is described only once in a few words in only one of the novels. Yet it's still a widely popular book. I think you're supposed to fill in the gaps yourself. Sherlock Holmes and Watson are rarely described as well. Lots of description is something that's only started to happen in modern books, I feel.
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:iconensoul:
ensoul Featured By Owner Dec 30, 2012  Professional General Artist
Fuck yeah Wodehouse.
The best authors don't have to rely on detailed character descriptions to hold your interest. It's not a modern invention but it is damn cheesy.
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:iconbrennanba:
BrennanBA Featured By Owner Dec 31, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
One of my favourate series, when I was a child, was the Edge Chronicles which, while it had a lot of pictures, it also never bothered to tell you the race of the main character, who was an elf like creature, until the sixth book; and even then it never bothered to explain what a fourthling was. I had to search the internet to figure that out.
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:iconsweettalker101:
SweetTalker101 Featured By Owner Dec 30, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I understand but I think it shouldn't be that hard of a thing to do.
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:iconbrennanba:
BrennanBA Featured By Owner Dec 31, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I don't think it's so much about difficulty but keeping it vague so that you can have a basic picture of what the person looks like without the need of hundreds of pages of description which could take away from pace or dialogue.

If you look back at the book's descriptions you'll usually find that each character has a main point drawn up about him. It'll be either the size of his nose, the colour of his eye, the fact that he's very fat or very thin.

In 'The Lord of the Flies' that's how it happens. Piggy is fat and has glasses. The bad guy is ginger and lanky. Simon has black hair. The main character has barely developed past infancy. (AKA: he looks about 8-10)
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