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December 2, 2012
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Fiction/Fantasy Recommendations?

:iconluna-bell07:
Luna-Bell07 Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2012  Student Writer
:bulletblue: Hi there! I'm looking for a great book to read! Can anyone help me?

-Fiction and/or Fantasy, please!
-Preferable: strong, male heroes, NO cliche heroines/female sidekicks/love interests. Stories about friendship/brotherhood preferred. Please NO: clumsy guy falls for flawless girl, woman with really crappy attitude/dark past pretends not to notice guy she's obviously in love with, etc. NO CLICHE STORYLINES.
-Urban fantasy is great too!

-Book must be for adults. No YA.
-No stories that focus solely on gore, and/or sex.
-AND PLEASE NO CLICHES. PREFERABLY NO CLICHE FEMALE CHARACTERS.

Thank you :heart:
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Devious Comments

:iconfredfan11:
fredfan11 Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
The Sword of Truth series is fantastic.
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:iconsniper0092:
Sniper0092 Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Jurassic Park.
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:iconensoul:
ensoul Featured By Owner Jan 14, 2013  Professional General Artist
Jasper Fforde. Most famously did the Thursday Next series, which is pretty good (books have their own universe, crazy conspiracies happen), also started the Nursery Crimes series and the one-off Fifty Shades of Grey (no relation) which is awesome.
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:iconmapledragons:
MapleDragons Featured By Owner Jan 14, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Artemis Fowl series. Fantasy + SciFi = coolios.
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:iconavix215:
Avix215 Featured By Owner Jan 10, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Check out Ranger's apprentice, by John Flanagan. It's pretty fantastic.
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:iconmeganekun:
meganekun Featured By Owner Jan 3, 2013  Hobbyist Artist
Terry Pratchett's Discworld series is a great Fantasy series, with an emphasis on humor and poking at fantasy cliches. It currently has four different... storylines (not sure if that's the word I'd use), but each book is stand alone.

They say a good one-of book in the series that's a good introduction to Discworld as a whole is Small Gods.

Personally, my favorite Discworld series is the City Watch. Start with "Guards! Guards!" The lead character hates the type of hero with the perfect golden armor and with a smile that goes "Ting!"
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:iconmangagirl1603:
mangagirl1603 Featured By Owner Jan 12, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Agreed. I'm very fond of the books too, although my favourite series is the 'Death' series. Hogfather's my favourite.

To the person who made the thread, he also writes rather loose parodies of famous books and plays and turns them into Discworld books. Some examples:

Maskerade- Phantom of the Opera parody
Wyrd Sisters- MacBeth parody
Lords and Ladies- Midsummer Night's Dream parody
Night Watch- Supposedly a Les Miserables parody but I couldn't tell you that cause I haven't read Les Mis.
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:iconmemnalar:
Memnalar Featured By Owner Jan 2, 2013
Somebody already gave you Glen Cook, and I'll co-sign that recommendation. Everything on your list is found in the Black Company series, and the female characters are no one to trifle with.

Otherwise, look at Robert Zelazny (Amber Chronicles), and Steven Brust (Vlad Taltos series).
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:icondr-shadowbell:
dr-shadowbell Featured By Owner Dec 29, 2012  Student General Artist
DeNiro's Game by Rawi Hage. Based on what you described, that one fits the bill.

American Gods and also Anansi Boys by Neil Gaiman are very good. Try The Dark Tower series by Stephen King.
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:iconrevampyre:
revampyre Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2012  Hobbyist Writer
Redeeming Grace by Erin Sinnott (:

Not at all cliche and not exactly YA (it can be for any age range, though adult is probably strongly preferred due to some of the themes). I highly, highly recommend it. It's not a very well known book, but I guarantee that once you start reading, you won't be able to put it down!
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:iconsambev:
Sambev Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Well, I had the same question as you and got some good suggestions, so here's my suggestion: The Diamond Age by Neal Stephenson. The book is very feminist, postmodern, a little steampunky without being too trendy, and it's very well written which is a plus for me.
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:iconsatsumayu:
Satsumayu Featured By Owner Dec 27, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
The tears of Artamon (Sara Ash)
At beginning, the hero is kind of the "clumsy guy falls for flawless girl" type, but it changes very quickly :)

The Time Master Trilogy (Louise Cooper) (and her other trilogies too)
Really a great trilogy dealing with the good/evil fight in an original way.

Mitborn Trilogy (Brandon Sanderson)
The "hero" is a girl, but is really strong and acts like a tomboy.

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:icongrandmasteremporer:
GrandMasterEmporer Featured By Owner Dec 7, 2012
There's one fantasy book that's way out of the ordinary: The 13 1/2 Lives of Captain Bluebear by Walter Moers. It looks like a kid's book because of the drawings in it, but it's actually surprisingly dark, and has a lot of pun-based humor. I would describe it as a mix between The Phantom Tollbooth and The Odyssey.
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:iconmiramelle:
Miramelle Featured By Owner Dec 5, 2012  Hobbyist
I would recommend virtually anything by Sheri S. Tepper or Tim Powers. Tepper (a scifi and fantasy writer) seems to favor female protagonists, Powers (mostly an Urban Fantasy and Historical Fiction writer) male. Both write interesting, believable characters and engaging plots. The Anubis Gates and The True Game Trilogy are some of my favorite books.
Harder to find but very good is P.C. Hodgell's God Stalk and Dark of the Moon.

Over on the science end of the fiction spectrum, I also like David Brin, Larry Niven, John Varley and Harry Harrison.
Ray Bradbury and Terry Prattchett are a given in any rec list, of course.
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:iconkenny1315:
Kenny1315 Featured By Owner Dec 5, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
Fire Proof!
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:icongrymryder:
GrymRyder Featured By Owner Dec 3, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Actually had a rather nice read recently.. a book called Power Exchange by AJ Rose. --Though its not exactly centered on friendship, it was still something very refreshing for me :lmao:
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:iconragnaice:
ragnaice Featured By Owner Dec 3, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I'm not sure what you consider cliché storylines. One could argue that stories about friendship/brotherhood/freedom/self-discovery yadda yadda are all cliched... but I'm going to suggest Naomi Novik's Temeraire series. It's about the Napoleonic wars, only in an alternate universe, with dragons. [link]
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:iconautumn-hills:
Autumn-Hills Featured By Owner Dec 3, 2012  Professional Writer
I would wholeheartedly suggest GRAVEDIGGER.

It's definitely non-cliche, with many strong male characters. Sounds like this was practically written for you, as it has strong themes of brotherhood and friendship running throughout - absolutely no romantic subplot.

It has subverted undead and monster slaying, with much gore, as well as a sort of political (evil magical government) thing going on.

[link]

The link will take you to both the Kindle and Paperback versions of Gravedigger on Amazon.com
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:iconnenril-tf:
Nenril-Tf Featured By Owner Dec 3, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
Tolkien...Everything! but depends on how difficult you choose your lecture...(so ask...)
The Watches saga by S.Lukyanenko
and the Dark Tower saga by S.King.
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:iconnicocc98:
Nicocc98 Featured By Owner Dec 3, 2012
The Aleph.
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:icondrachenmagier:
drachenmagier Featured By Owner Dec 3, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
For urban Fantasy I can really recommend the Saga of Matthew Swift, written by Kate Griffin. :D Urban Magic in the London of today. Though it's rather dark urban fantasy.

Short summary: Matthew Swift, Sorcerer, got killed two years ago and is now revived by the Electric Blue Angels, the bits and bites of conversation flowing through the wires around the world.

The first book (A Madness of Angels) is about how he finds out why and by whom he was killed mostly. (more books of the series: The Midnight Mayor, The Neon Court, The Minority Council. Spin off 1: Stray Souls)

I was told that Dresten Files is pretty similar (dark urban fantasy too) and quite a few of my friends love that series. I got it here, but haven't started reading it yet.

Both series start with a massivly overpowered character, but their enemies will make them suffer non the less. :D
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:iconmidnightmagnificent:
MidNightMagnificent Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
  • Terry Goodkind's Sword Of Truth series. Please do NOT judge based on whatever you might have seen of the TV series. Books much better.


  • Stephen King's The Dark Tower novels.


  • David Gemmell's Chronicles of the Jerusalem Man

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:icondrachenmagier:
drachenmagier Featured By Owner Dec 3, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I loved the Jerusalem Man by Gemmell. :D Postappocalypse in a wonderful form.
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:iconmidnightmagnificent:
MidNightMagnificent Featured By Owner Dec 3, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Funny how past predictions of the apocalypse(Hell unleashed on Earth) always seem more attractive than current predictions of the apocalypse(Idiots strapped to chairs living fantasy lives out in a virtual reality/greenscreen environment.). Just sayin'. :shrug:
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:icondrachenmagier:
drachenmagier Featured By Owner Dec 3, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
The current one always follow the same patterns. :) I liked it when I read a fantasy book and later found out: Fuck, that will be our future! O_o

The newer books all show you very fast how the world will end, which... takes the fun out of it, if you ask me.
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:iconmidnightmagnificent:
MidNightMagnificent Featured By Owner Dec 3, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Hm, yeah, you've pretty much summed it up. The end just doesn't seem fun anymore. Not even horrific. I'll just call it mind-numbingly boring. Period.
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:icondrachenmagier:
drachenmagier Featured By Owner Dec 3, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
That, and I really had it with Manhatten turning into a jungle.
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:iconmidnightmagnificent:
MidNightMagnificent Featured By Owner Dec 3, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Haha. Yeah. I have no idea why that idea is so attractive to new apocalypse writers. Weird as Hell. Sigh.
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:icondrachenmagier:
drachenmagier Featured By Owner Dec 3, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Though there is that one book... a theoretic thought-construct about what would happen if humans would vanish in this second, leaving the world as it is, just without humans. It's quite interesting to read, which parts of the electricity would give up first, what happens to the Subways, what plants grow first, what buildings take how long to collaps...
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(1 Reply)
:icondorkface4:
dorkface4 Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2012
Magician - Raymond E. Feist.
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:iconbrotherdiaz:
BrotherDiaz Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2012  Hobbyist Writer
The Black Company Series by Glen Cook

amazing books to read i think there is 10 books in the main story line and 1 offshoot that gives closure to a couple characters.
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:iconhappyduckcreator:
HappyDuckCreator Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
American Gods and Anansi Boys by Neil Gaimen sound right up your alley. You might like the latter a bit more, but the former is more detailed and a longer story overall. Definitely give either book a shot!
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:iconmessersandman:
MesserSandman Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2012  Student Writer
Hmm. Have you tried any of the newer Halo books? I know that Halo probably isn't your thing, but most if not all have what you are looking for. Only one cliche to speak of, and it has a woman character (not a lead character specifically) with a rather stoic attitude with a pretty messed up past. Even that is pushing it, because of her status and what she had been through, it isn't really even apparent that she even has a love interest...Other than that, things are pretty much golden.

It has strong male heroes, and there are even great pairing opportunities for you to take advantage of :D I know that you are into Yaoi, so just putting that whole pairing thing out there.

It obviously has some violence/gore, but it doesn't make up a bunch of the storyline like you think it would. When it comes to sexual themes...well there really isn't any. I guess its much like every other popular videogame/movie/book universe in that respect.

When it comes to specific books in the series, I would suggest:

Halo: The Thursday War or Halo: Glasslands. They both follow the same people, so you won't be lost when it comes to specific characters and their development over a period of time.
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:icondefaultking:
defaultking Featured By Owner Dec 5, 2012  Hobbyist Writer
I haven't read those ones yet, but the first book by Deitz and everything by Nylund were great, even though they had completely different tones. I know there was one - either the Harvest one or the one after that - that I didn't care for at all. I'm glad the series seems to be picking back up again when it comes to quality.
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:iconmessersandman:
MesserSandman Featured By Owner Dec 5, 2012  Student Writer
Oh yeah the quality is back. Hopefully for good this time. Karen Travis is definitely a worthy successor the the authors of the original trilogy.
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:icondefaultking:
defaultking Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2012  Hobbyist Writer
YEEESSSS. After Nylund, that one sequel written by a staff writer who'd never written a novel in his life was quite a let-down...
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:iconnephenee:
Nephenee Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2012
"Something from the Nightside" by Simon Green
"The Man with the Golden Torc" by Simon Green
"Another Fine Myth" by Robert Aspirin
Any of the Dresden books by Jim Butcher.

All have strong male protagonists, though the Myth books by Robert Aspirin are really more of buddy books.
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