Shop Mobile More Submit  Join Login

Details

Closed to new replies
December 22, 2012
Link

Statistics

Replies: 33

Anybody hot on old English??

:iconthepeanutbutterfly:
ThePeanutButterfly Featured By Owner Dec 22, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
OK, I know this isn't really an open question, but yeah, forgive me....
What is the best translation for "Thy visage entertains me"?
Is it a kind remark, like "Your face makes me happy", or a derisive comment "Your face is silly and makes me laugh".
Or does it mean something different?
Reply

You can no longer comment on this thread as it was closed due to no activity for a month.

Devious Comments

:iconanatarakentara:
AnataraKentara Featured By Owner Dec 26, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
It could mean both.

It depends on the voice and tone I guess.

But, more often than not, it means "Your face is silly"

It takes a damn good womanizer/manizer*?* to pull off "Thy visage entertains me" romantically in ANY era.
Reply
:iconthepeanutbutterfly:
ThePeanutButterfly Featured By Owner Dec 26, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
Haha, OK! That's what I thought :P
Reply
:iconshininginthedarkness:
So, everyone, I've been Ŝinking of bringing back ' Ŝ'. To me, it's Ŝe best letter ever invented. Anyone else in on Ŝis?
Reply
:iconthepeanutbutterfly:
ThePeanutButterfly Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
Hell yeah! Bring back the 'Ŝ'! :w00t:
Reply
:iconco-phantom:
Co-Phantom Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
It looks too much like a p though. :noes:
Reply
:iconshininginthedarkness:
Hrm, that is confusing. I swear I have an dictionary from the 60's that talks about thorn, and it looks more like a 'y' than a 'p' (thus the confusion of 'ye olde' for ' Ŝe olde '. But apparently that's not the version that made it into ASCII or Unicode or whatever. Drat.
Reply
:iconsagethethird:
sagethethird Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2012
Thy visage entertains me is not "old" English, it's actually modern english, the kind that Shakespeare used

"Thy" is a form of "you", Visage we still use copiously enough not to change but colloquially or in standard terms it's face, "entertains" we still use so don't change it but if you want it to sound more like english a tool wouldn't use then change "entertains me" to "makes me happy"

so in modern colloquial terms perhaps "your face makes me happy" or "I think your face is hilarious" or "I like your face"

but old english, even middle english would read more like (anglo saxon, or Old English, around the time beowulf would have been written like 400-1100 A.D.) "ye fácian ....something" I can't find the other words XD and (middle english, like chaucer's canterbury tales, 1200's to like mid 1400's to early 1500's) "I can't find a translator for that because google sucks but look at this [link] for reference on the history of "English"

English is closely tied to German, as both stem from the same language at one point, so at one point you could only say the language was "germanic" but it's Anglo-Saxon that eventually evolved into the English we know today that we call "Old-English"

also Old English and German both have Genativ and Dative Cases, and similar sentence structures, something to note when translating also.

hope that helped :)
Reply
:iconthepeanutbutterfly:
ThePeanutButterfly Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
Thanks for the link; it was really interesting, and I guess you're right ~ my sentence is pretty damn modern compared to old English :P I would change the title if I could..."Anybody hot on modern English?", but then I'd sound stupid, like I don't understand my own language xD
I thought it was something along those lines. Even so, "I think your face is hilarious" and "I like your face" have quite different connotations in modern day English, right?
I suppose it all depends on context and stuff...
Anyway, thanks for helping!:D
Reply
:iconvisionoftheworld:
VISIONOFTHEWORLD Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2012
But the era you quoted from, middle english- contains many words and phrases derived from French. When the Normans invaded England in 1066, they did not speak anglo saxon- and that language has germanic as well as scandinavian roots since that was where the previous conquerors (in 449) came from. I'm not pulling this off wikipedia, so my years could be wrong. I don't know what words or phrases came from French, maybe wiki has that.
Reply
:iconsagethethird:
sagethethird Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2012
yeah there's a lot I don't know about the subject but you're right, 1066, Battle of Hastings, is pretty much when the french started playing a major role in influencing the evolution of the language, Chaucer wrote in a language that would be easy for not just the nobility (french speaking people) but the common folk (people who spoke a fusion of both) to speak. Sadly he only finished like 25 of the 100 or so "tales" before he died :(

I didn't know about the Scandinavian influences in 449, that's fascinating, I'll have to look that up, especially Scandinavian language at the time :la:
Reply
:iconlittlefishey:
littlefishey Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2012
A little bit of context might help a person interpret that phrase. 
Reply
:iconthepeanutbutterfly:
ThePeanutButterfly Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
Umm...It didn't really come with any context. That's why it confused me a little ^^;
Reply
:icontwimper:
Twimper Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2012   General Artist
i would say that is 'you look fumy/interesting' depending on the context it could be sarcastic or just a interesting meaning just different.
Reply
:iconthepeanutbutterfly:
ThePeanutButterfly Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
Ah, OK. Guess I'm just gonna have to use my initiative...:)
Reply
:iconoperia:
Operia Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Old English would be pretty much impossible to read to a modern day English speaking person.
Anyway, that's a technicality.
I'd say its most likely translation is "I welcome your presence" or something like that. I guess it would be dependant on context :shrug:
Reply
:iconthepeanutbutterfly:
ThePeanutButterfly Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
Thank you :)
Reply
:icongigapipen1407:
GigaPipen1407 Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I'm pretty sure that it means "You are in my presence" or "You entertain me with your presence"

So they're basically saying that you're there.
Reply
:iconthepeanutbutterfly:
ThePeanutButterfly Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
Oh, OK. Thanks :)
Reply
:icongigapipen1407:
GigaPipen1407 Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
You're welcome.
Reply
:iconhamburgerhelperplz:
HamburgerHelperPlz Featured By Owner Dec 22, 2012
Or you could just say, "Your face entertains me."
Reply
:iconhamburgerhelperplz:
HamburgerHelperPlz Featured By Owner Dec 22, 2012
Old English? No, that's Early Modern English. You would barely be able to read Old English.

English works the same just as it did during the 17th or whatever century text you pulled that line out of as it does today. It depends on the context, who's saying it, and to whom.
Reply
:iconplasticusforkus:
PlasticusForkus Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2012
I'm pleased that you clarified that. They should've known better :no:
Reply
:iconhamburgerhelperplz:
HamburgerHelperPlz Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2012
She's from the UK for God's sake. You'd think they'd know a thing or two about their own language that they created.
Reply
:iconplasticusforkus:
PlasticusForkus Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2012
In fairness, she's also fifteen and they teach us more of your history than our own nowadays.
Reply
:iconhamburgerhelperplz:
HamburgerHelperPlz Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2012
Well shit, really? Like what?
Reply
:iconplasticusforkus:
PlasticusForkus Featured By Owner Dec 24, 2012
It gets worse after 16.

For example I can name every US president between Hoover and Obama. But I can't do that for British PMs.
Reply
:iconhamburgerhelperplz:
HamburgerHelperPlz Featured By Owner Dec 25, 2012
That's depressing.
Reply
:iconplasticusforkus:
PlasticusForkus Featured By Owner Dec 26, 2012
Creeping Americanisation. You're an empire whether you like it or not :lol:
Reply
:iconthepeanutbutterfly:
ThePeanutButterfly Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
Believe me: most of the time, the English language is a mystery to us all...
Reply
:iconthepeanutbutterfly:
ThePeanutButterfly Featured By Owner Dec 22, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
Oh, I see.
Reply
:iconhamburgerhelperplz:
HamburgerHelperPlz Featured By Owner Dec 22, 2012
There actually isn't any need for a translation at all. It's all valid Modern English. All you need to do is swap out the archaic pronoun 'thy' with 'your' and you're good to go.
Reply
:iconthepeanutbutterfly:
ThePeanutButterfly Featured By Owner Dec 22, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
OK! I was trying to explain its meaning to my Korean penfriend, and couldn't quite work out the implication of the phrase....
Reply
:iconthe-build:
The-Build Featured By Owner Dec 22, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Did you get changed in the dark?
Reply
Add a Comment: