Shop Mobile More Submit  Join Login

Details

Closed to new replies
January 10, 2013
Link

Statistics

Replies: 32

No more public domain (in the U.S.)?

:icondelusionalhamster:
delusionalHamster Featured By Owner Jan 10, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Seems kinda perverse. Is this really happening? Can a government really take works that were once in public domain out of it? What if you use a public domain work in your own work, and later it gets made proprietary - are you then retroactively breaking the law, or does grandfather clause apply?

[link]
Reply

You can no longer comment on this thread as it was closed due to no activity for a month.

Devious Comments

:iconsiantjudas:
siantjudas Featured By Owner Jan 16, 2013   Digital Artist
You can't retroactively break the law. It's in the constitution.
However, if you are using it in an ongoing thing (based on your hypothetical situation), then they may ask for you to stop.

Example. If using paint was made illegal, you could not be charged for using paint before the law existed, and any paintings made before the law would be legal. However, continuing to use paint after the law would be illegal, and any paintings made after the law would be illegal. Make sense?
Reply
:icondelusionalhamster:
delusionalHamster Featured By Owner Jan 16, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yeah but it's still stupid. Not to mention immoral. What is public domain once should stay that way, period. No one has the right to appropriate common property. It's like if I suddenly said that I own all the air and everyone has to pay me for breathing. That'd be ridiculous because air is common property and no one can claim ownership of it.
Reply
:iconmlaproduction:
MLAproduction Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2013  Student Digital Artist
pretty much. it is happening and has happened.

and as for public domain grandfathering it's up to the 'new' owner to decide if its worth suing the seconday creator and it also would depend on the court.


I'm all for if the individual or corporation who owns the [object/picture/song/etc] is still alive or functioning than the copyright should continue to exist.

However ONCE something falls into public domain it should stay there.
Reply
:icondelusionalhamster:
delusionalHamster Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Copyright should exist during the lifetime of the creator, HOWEVER the protection granted by copyright should be significantly reduced. It should be considered that whenever a work is published publicly it should be free to be shared and copied for noncommercial uses. Copyright should only apply to commercial use.

Also nobody should be able to claim ownership on public domain works.
Reply
:iconmlaproduction:
MLAproduction Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2013  Student Digital Artist
I agree.
Reply
:iconmlaproduction:
MLAproduction Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2013  Student Digital Artist
pretty much. it is and has happened. and as for public domain grandfathering it's up to the 'new' owner to decide if its worth suing also would depend on the court.

then there's disney with the renewable copyright just so they can hang on to all of their characters.
Reply
:iconnovuso:
Novuso Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2013
This has been going on for a long time. The "Happy Birthday" song written in 1893 was removed from the public domain and copywritten by Time Warner. In the US it is illegal to sing this song in public.

The really sick stuff is the pharmaceutical companies copywritting people's DNA. This is the type of tyranny not even George Orwell could imagine.

The whole system needs to be torn down before it gets any worse.
Reply
:icondoctorv23:
DoctorV23 Featured By Owner Jan 16, 2013
Total abuse of copyright. [link]
I'm trying to wrap my head around this one and it won't...someone writes a popular song. Being popular, people like to sing it. Then those same people who gave the author of the song it's popularity and success can get arrested for doing so :(
Reply
:iconnovuso:
Novuso Featured By Owner Jan 16, 2013
Copyright is game of scoundrels, frauds, and liars.

The Mildred and Patty Hill sisters were pretty much plagiarists themselves. "The good morning to all" song they copyrighted was but a ripoff of older songs with exact same melody. "Happy Greetings to All" and "Good night to you all" published in 1858. [link]

This goes along with what Professor of law Robert Brauneis wrote, “Many question the validity of the current copyright, as the melody of the song was most likely borrowed from other popular songs of the time, and the lyrics were likely improvised by a group of five- and six-year-old children who never received any compensation.” [link]


The American court system is beyond corrupt when it comes to upholding the copyrights of liars. Another example story is the two greatest fortunes of the modern era Bill Gates and Steve Jobs were founded on piracy. The founding principle of point and click computing was invented by the Xerox corporation but they never patented it and then the thieves stole it to pass it off as their own creations which became MicroSoft and Apple. [link]

Bill Gates and Steve Jobs, kings of technology? Hell no, more like king of thieves and lord of liars. The world as we know it is not what it seems. The whole thing is just a big racket.
Reply
:icondelusionalhamster:
delusionalHamster Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yep. The copyright mafia is worse than the actual mafia in many ways.
Reply
:icondefense2:
defense2 Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2013
Sadly my congressmen would support taking copyrights from dead beats and losers who don't have the money to defend themselves.... (basically stealing the lollipop from the baby.)
Reply
:iconartman40:
Artman40 Featured By Owner Jan 12, 2013
Where are petitions to extend public domain?
Reply
:icondelusionalhamster:
delusionalHamster Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I don't know. Why don't you make one?
Reply
:iconthegman0:
theGman0 Featured By Owner Jan 12, 2013  Hobbyist
That's fucked up.
Reply
:icondelusionalhamster:
delusionalHamster Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yes, it is.
Reply
:iconartman40:
Artman40 Featured By Owner Jan 12, 2013
You know, why won't you post it on a journal and spread the word?
Reply
:iconkalinka-shadows:
Kalinka-Shadows Featured By Owner Jan 12, 2013
Unfortunately, yes, it's true already in the US. This is an effect of multiple copyright extensions that basically make Copyright eternity minus one day. The issue is, that with so much of the US manufacturing and production base moved to cheap labor countries, without the intellectual property industry, the government believes it will be insolvent. So the idea is to create a system where the US 'knows' everything and to use any technology, read any book, listen to any music, you must pay an American entity to do so. Even if said entity doesn't own the rights to do so.

It's absolutely true, that because of the DMCA, American corporations and individuals can issue take down notices, (see Youtube)for things they don't own, including user generated content, and commentary, the only solution is to repeal the DMCA.
Reply
:icondelusionalhamster:
delusionalHamster Featured By Owner Jan 12, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
That's right. When old businesses get complacent and fat, they become gatekeepers where their business model shifts from producing and innovating into preventing others from producing and innovating, so that everything has to go through them. That's really why the entertainment industry is so scared of the internet and torrents and all that - not because of piracy, that's just an excuse. They are scared because the internet makes them obsolete, as anyone can self-publish, and they are afraid of becoming irrelevant.

The copyright mafia is a really disgusting business, maybe even more so than the actual mafia - after all, why bother breaking the law when you can just buy the law.
Reply
:iconartman40:
Artman40 Featured By Owner Jan 12, 2013
It gets worse. TV channel studios today are only good for producing TV shows. When it comes to distributing the shows, they actually hinder that. It's like paying a car repairman for completely breaking down your car.
Reply
:iconkalinka-shadows:
Kalinka-Shadows Featured By Owner Jan 12, 2013
This is believe it or not, not the first time this has happened. There used to be used to be in the early 1900s, a Motion Picture Patents Association that could control virtually any movie could be produced, (on film) for consumption anywhere in the US. If you made a movie in the US, about anything, there was a mandatory fee to this organization.

Television in the 1950s and 1960s was one of the most tightly controlled and censored media there was.
Reply
:iconjackmolotov3:
JackMolotov3 Featured By Owner Jan 12, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
when pro-copyright business intrests dominate congress, they can do anything they want.
Reply
:icondelusionalhamster:
delusionalHamster Featured By Owner Jan 12, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
You guys should get the Pirate Party elected, like we did here in Europe.
Reply
:iconjackmolotov3:
JackMolotov3 Featured By Owner Jan 12, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
There is a national pirate party USA.

Less than successful. I envy Europe in this regard.

I've got a lot going on in my life, and I am not in the position to make a move.

otherwise I'd out handing out fliers.
Reply
:iconqwertywithak:
qwertywithak Featured By Owner Jan 13, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
I'll help them out, any resources would be nice. Even though I'm an anarchist I'd love to help out anyone who stands for freedom.
Reply
:icondoctorv23:
DoctorV23 Featured By Owner Jan 10, 2013
This is disturbing and a perversion of copyright law, its purpose and intent.
Reply
:icondelusionalhamster:
delusionalHamster Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yes it is.
Reply
:iconjeysie:
Jeysie Featured By Owner Jan 12, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
This.

Unfortunately people use this sort of thing as a call to abolish copyright completely, as opposed to fixing it. :/
Reply
:iconenuocale:
EnuoCale Featured By Owner Jan 10, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
What? They better fucking not.
Reply
:icondelusionalhamster:
delusionalHamster Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
It appears they already did.
Reply
:icontacosteev:
tacosteev Featured By Owner Jan 10, 2013  Hobbyist
I believe Winnie the Pooh was taken out of the public domain and recopyrighted. Very bogus IMO.
Reply
:icondelusionalhamster:
delusionalHamster Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Pretty much everything disney does is bogus.
Reply
:icontacosteev:
tacosteev Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2013  Hobbyist
Sad but true.
Reply
Add a Comment: