Deviant Login Shop  Join deviantART for FREE Take the Tour

Details

Closed to new replies
December 10, 2012
Link

Statistics

Replies: 61

Politics and Fiction

:icontehbigd:
Which authors' fictional work, in your mind, best embodies a political/religious idea? This can be anything from a single book, to an entire body of work.

For instance: I've always thought Arthur C Clarke was a great example of a socialist. Between the 2001 series and any number of other books, he pretty much stated that the end-result of any society is going to be a socialist state. His "machine society" in 2001 was completely Communist, but only worked because it wasn't people. It was a funny idea, when I read it, that a political idea could be perfect, but because of human nature be terrible in practice. The fun thing about his work is that, whenever possible, he coached it with the best approximation of science he could do, even making some fantastic predictions about our solar system.

Other books that held interesting political ideas IMO: Snowcrash, by Neal Stephenson; the Sprawl Trilogy by William Gibson: Starship Troopers, by Heinlein; C.S. Lewis's retelling of Christian Mythology in the Narnia series; Alan Moore's V For Vendetta on anarchy; Neal Gaiman's wonderful world in American Gods, and any number of classic answers.
Don't be afraid to share, I'm looking for recommendations just as much as ideas. I'd love to hear some opinions on how all of you think life imitates art, or vice versa.
Reply

You can no longer comment on this thread as it was closed due to no activity for a month.

Devious Comments

:iconheaven-spawn:
heaven-spawn Dec 23, 2012
e e cummings
Reply
:iconsaintartaud:
saintartaud Dec 20, 2012  Professional General Artist
One author people don't talk about a lot is Doris Lessing.  I only got into her earlier this year, but much of her work is political, or at least deals with politics as an issue.  The novels from the Children of Violence series and The Golden Notebook contain some pretty painful indictments of communist groups from the 1930s-1950s.  Not from a reactionary angle, but from someone deeply involved with the party in Rhodesia for at least a decade and for some of her time in England.  She also touches on some feminist issues, though she dislikes being called a feminist writer.  The novels I read also touched on issues of racial discrimination in colonial Africa, though my understanding is that's more the main subject of The Grass is Singing.

I also read some E.M. Forster a while back and was for some reason surprised by how much he dealt with the politics and class in Edwardian England.  I mean, the love interest in Room With a View is the son of *gasp* a working class socialist, which the Merchant/Ivory adaptation kinda glosses over.  Howard's End is pretty interesting from a political angle as well.
Reply
:icondragonflae:
Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West surprisingly does a great job embodying government, class warfare, equal rights and religion in its entirety.
Reply
:iconheaven-spawn:
heaven-spawn Dec 24, 2012
is that a joke movie?
Reply
:icondragonflae:
No, it's a book and a Broadway musical. The only joke here is you.
Reply
:iconheaven-spawn:
heaven-spawn Dec 24, 2012
i thought it was a joke movie
Reply
:iconmaddmatt:
Goodnight Moon.

Of course, with the fiscal cliff talks, I think this book is insightful, "If You Give a Moose a Muffin."
Reply
:iconheaven-spawn:
heaven-spawn Dec 24, 2012
i love that book
Reply
:iconragerancher:
- I think Charles Dickens works best showed the importance of basic welfare and employment laws.
- George Orwell, the dangers of state and propaganda
- Shogun highlights the dodgy dealings and dirty politics in the world very well
- His dark materials trilogy represents the dangers of religious institutions
- Lastly I'd have to say Terry Pratchet discworld books. They may be very humourous and absurd but some of the observations are pretty accurate and astute.
Reply
:icontehbigd:
I haven't read Shogun, I'll have to get around to that.
Reply
Add a Comment: