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November 16, 2012
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Library Donation gone wild

:iconsvenler:
Svenler Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Professional Photographer
After cleaning out my library and converting numerous of my paper books to ebooks, I was ready to donate several thousand dollars worth of books to my local library. I had called a few days in advance and informed that I would stop by to drop them off.

I loaded all the books into sturdy boxes and put them into the car. I was amazed to see that my local library doesn't offer free parking anymore and the drop-off parking zone was removed. In any case, I paid for parking and walked in. When I asked if someone could help me unload, I was told that by order of the state government, they are not allowed to touch the books till they are in official government bins. Can they touch the boxes at least? Nope. By now I was fed up but carrying all the boxes in was easier than to drive back home. Yep, I also had to unload all the boxes myself and was scolded that some of the text books were too new. Apparently the state government doesn't allow donations of textbooks that are too new. I didn't expect great signs of gratitude, but a thank you would have been nice.

Now after the rant, to my questions: Is it the same in your area? Do you think government funding made libraries less dependent on individual donations to a level where libraries don't care anymore? Do you think government should be able to determine what books one can donate and if the volunteers can help you carry books in?
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Devious Comments

:icondoctorv23:
DoctorV23 Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2012
Too new eh? It's funny how people tend to vastly undervalue something if it's offered for free. You paid for parking on top of it plus did the carrying and provided the boxes, so it's almost like you paid them to take the books.
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:iconebolabearvomit:
EbolaBearVomit Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012
I grew up in a real shitty neighborhood.
My library was covered in spray paint and closed most of the year for about 15 years.:rofl:

Where I live now you can drop off anything you want. They recycle the garbage and send stuff they don't need top other branches.
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:icontortellinipen:
TortelliniPen Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012
I think that there should be some criteria for accepting books. I don't believe in censorship, however, I doubt that libraries should take books titled Why We Should Kill All Black People. Mein Kampf would be fine, since its historically important (although I've heard that Hitler wasn't a very good writer).

Also, if the library already has several copies of that book, or if the donated books are very poor quality (i.e. falling apart, missing pages, jelly stains, etc.) then that's a valid reason.

I've never actually parked at a library; I don't even have a license (I should get on that, but my hometown is small and I go to college in Boston where I've never needed a car), and its within walking distance anyway. Your library does seem a little extreme, though.
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:iconajglass:
AJGlass Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
What are these "books" that you speak of? :bucktooth:



          . o O ( Hmm, I wonder where the "on" button is. )
     :reading:
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:iconbullet-magnet:
Bullet-Magnet Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012
And where's the charge adapter?
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:iconchakatblackstar:
ChakatBlackstar Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012
The library where I grew up never had free parking until after 5pm, but that's the way it was with all the city-owned public parking lots.
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:icondivine--apathia:
divine--apathia Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Yes, there should be evaluation of the books donated. The two things that I think have to be extremist and poor quality (physically) books shouldn't be allowed.

I think a fair way to class something as being 'extremist' would be something inciting violence. A book literally falling apart is obvious. (it'd be rather unfair for someone to have to pay for a book if it broke, if it was breaking already.)

Furthermore, on a library by library basis, having more strict criteria could make sense, especially if they are tight on space.

For example:
Refusing books that they already have ample copies.
Refusing books that don't suit clientèle. (lets say a library is in a business district, and the majority of people borrowing are adults. they have small children's section, but it's full. They do not have the demand for them.)
Refusing factual books that are too old (lets say a 1920's book on science.)

However, I think those rules should only be made because of issues with space etc.
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:iconajglass:
AJGlass Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
I don't know of any library that won't accept "extremist" books - whatever those may be.

In fact, censorship is a huge deal at public libraries and I know that the ones around where I live always come down on the side of openness and allowing patrons as much choice as possible.
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:icondivine--apathia:
divine--apathia Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
~TortelliniPen Captured what I mean. 'I doubt that libraries should take books titled Why We Should Kill All Black People. Mein Kampf would be fine. '
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:iconajglass:
AJGlass Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
You might be surprised what books some libraries are willing to take - and what books some libraries aren't willing to take. I know of some libraries in the US south that won't stock books about abortion or homosexuality. Yet they'll stock books which promote going back to an age of slavery and books which advocate suppressing the rights of women.

The way I see it, libraries should accept ALL books and let their readers/users decide which ones they want to read. Of course, some libraries do have limited space and there's nothing wrong with selling off books that haven't been checked out in years or maybe even decades or for which a newer version now exists in the collection. Those should be the criteria by which books are sold and it should not be based solely on content or because some library board doesn't "approve" of it.
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:icondivine--apathia:
divine--apathia Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
You might be surprised what books some libraries are willing to take - and what books some libraries aren't willing to take. I know of some libraries in the US south that won't stock books about abortion or homosexuality. Yet they'll stock books which promote going back to an age of slavery and books which advocate suppressing the rights of women.

And that's not what I'm promoting. At all.



Of course, some libraries do have limited space and there's nothing wrong with selling off books that haven't been checked out in years or maybe even decades or for which a newer version now exists in the collection. Those should be the criteria by which books are sold and it should not be based solely on content or because some library board doesn't "approve" of it.

Literature is not all equal. A copy of 'The Divine Comedy' or 'War and Peace' Should not be thrown out to make way for '50 shades of grey' or 'How to: kill dem niggers and get away with it'

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:iconajglass:
AJGlass Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
And that's not what I'm promoting. At all.

Then apparently I misunderstood. :O_o: Sorry about that.

Literature is not all equal. A copy of 'The Divine Comedy' or 'War and Peace' Should not be thrown out to make way for '50 shades of grey' or 'How to: kill dem niggers and get away with it'

I personally agree with you. However, other folks probably won't. Hence why libraries need to carry as wide a selection of books as they physically can and be very careful in deciding what gets sold.
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:icondivine--apathia:
divine--apathia Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Books promoting misogyny, white supremacy, religious bigotry would be allowed, under what I'm saying. Books that wouldn't be allowed would be books such as 'To Train Up a Child' Which has been linked to at least 10 deaths.
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:iconajglass:
AJGlass Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
Giving bad advice in a book happens all the time.

One need only look at parenting books going back decades which are packed full of bad advice. And many of those books are still on library shelves all around the world!

Consider this as just one example: Many older parenting books say it's fine to lay a newborn down on it's tummy to sleep. This despite the fact that today we know that doing so has led to thousands of cases of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

It's up to the reader to do their due diligence and research before taking any advice from ANY book, new or old! It's not up to the library to remove the book because someone might read it and follow it and someone might die.
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(1 Reply)
:icondivine--apathia:
divine--apathia Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
I don't think it's an issue of censorship. Not a single library in the world has a complete collection of books in the world. If a book not being in the library is a issue of censorship, than all libraries are forcing censorship upon people.

You're misusing the word 'censorship'. Censorship is not 'not allowing someone to access something for free.' it is 'not allow someone to access something'.

There are many books I can not access at my local library For example, I can not get a copy of '120 days of Sodom' nor anything by Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu. (They do have some of his books, but they are in 'learning collections', which are packs made for educators.) I can not get a copy of 'A girl of limberlost'. I also can not get a copy of 'The importance of being earnest'.

120 days of sodom is very pornographic, however, the rest I listed are just older works, ranging from obscure to famous.

Does this mean the library is censoring me? God no. I've read them all. In fact, barring 120 days of Sodom, I can still access them for free, because as long as you have access to a computer, you can legally download them from Amazon, for free.

If those books were being censored, I wouldn't be able to get them legally.
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:iconajglass:
AJGlass Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
If a library won't accept a book which is being donated for public use, then that is censorship as the library is choosing not to let the public have access to that information. Now of course, if it's a matter of copyright or national security or something then that's different. But to simply not take a book because of its content, when it's content is perfectly legal, then that is censorship.

Also, there are different levels of censorship. Just because something is available online doesn't mean that the library isn't censoring it. It certainly is, just for its own patrons.

Also, let me just say that in my opinion, any library which is willing to stock Fifty Shades of Grey is in no position to censor 120 days of sodom.
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:icondivine--apathia:
divine--apathia Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
If a library won't accept a book which is being donated for public use, then that is censorship as the library is choosing not to let the public have access to that information.

By that, then a library has to take destroyed,dirty books that have book mites or bedbugs.


Also, there are different levels of censorship. Just because something is available online doesn't mean that the library isn't censoring it. It certainly is, just for its own patrons.

No, it's not. The library is not stopping the patrons from getting that book. The library is just stopping the patrons from getting that book for free.

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:iconajglass:
AJGlass Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
By that, then a library has to take destroyed,dirty books that have book mites or bedbugs.

Obviously if the book is in physically poor condition then that should be remedied if possible. That's just common sense.

The library is not stopping the patrons from getting that book. The library is just stopping the patrons from getting that book for free.

You're wrong, they ARE stopping their patrons from getting that book AT their library. Free or not is irrelevant (some libraries charge their patrons) - the library is standing between the patron and the book and making a choice NOT to allow the patron to have access. That IS censorship. And this is especially problematic if it's a public library which accepts public funds and has an elected library board - which many of them do.
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:iconzagstrike:
ZaGstrike Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012
"You're wrong, they ARE stopping their patrons from getting that book AT their library. Free or not is irrelevant"

Then by that logic all bookstores are using censorship as well, unless they sell EVERY SINGLE BOOK IN EXISTENCE.

Seriously, you have this weird definition of censorship. Censorship would be preventing ANYONE from reading the contents of said book, ie either promoting a national ban of the material or editing it to take out the offending features. A library showing discretion on what they put on their shelves is not the same thing since they're only choosing not to display the books on their shelves but are doing nothing to prevent it from being on the shelves of any other store.

I mean, what good would a book on the anatomy of chameleons or fifty shades of gray be in a library for primary school students?
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:iconajglass:
AJGlass Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
Then by that logic all bookstores are using censorship as well...

No, bookstores are usually private businesses (using private funds) and they are allowed to censor anything they want to because they're completely independent entities. They don't owe their customers anything nor do they serve the same function as a library. It really is a completely different situation.

It is you who has a weird definition of censorship. It doesn't have to be a broad or national campaign to ban something for it to be considered censorship. The truth is that censorship can happen/occur at different levels throughout a society and in innumerable different ways.

Just as one example: The major TV networks in the US are required by law to censor their TV stations by removing certain expletives (bad words) while many paid cable TV providers are not required to do so. So if you watch a movie on ABC it will be censored while the same movie on HBO is not. It doesn't matter that you can get around the censor by watching on HBO since that has no bearing on the fact that it's still censored on ABC (it's still an act of censorship).

So again, censorship can happen/occur at different levels throughout a society and it doesn't have to be complete to still be considered censorship.
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(1 Reply)
:icondivine--apathia:
divine--apathia Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Obviously if the book is in physically poor condition then that should be remedied if possible. That's just common sense.

But they are not allowing them to have the book, thus, OMG, CENSORSHIP.

You're wrong, they ARE stopping their patrons from getting that book AT their library.

Once again, it is literally impossible to have every single book in the world. OMG CENSORSHIP.

. Free or not is irrelevant (some libraries charge their patrons) - the library is standing between the patron and the book and making a choice NOT to allow the patron to have access

So, the library is physically stopping them from SHOCK, HORROR, going somewhere else?


And this is especially problematic if it's a public library which accepts public funds and has an elected library board - which many of them do.


Public libraries are a privilege, not a right. Especially now, in the modern world, as basically every book is now just a click away, online.
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:iconajglass:
AJGlass Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
But they are not allowing them to have the book, thus, OMG, CENSORSHIP.

You'll get the damn book after it's clean! :shakefist: :lol:

Once again, it is literally impossible to have every single book in the world.

True, but no one is going to suddenly donate every single book in the world to their local library. :lol: So that's not really going to be an issue.

So, the library is physically stopping them from SHOCK, HORROR, going somewhere else?

No, the library is physically stopping them from GETTING THE BOOK THERE! Also, some libraries do not participate in the inter-library loan service and many libraries are far apart from each other. So getting to another one can be difficult - especially if you can't drive and there's no public transportation (like in most of the US).

Public libraries are a privilege, not a right.

Incorrect. If the library is funded by tax dollars (or their board is elected), then the tax payers have a RIGHT to use them. Because the taxpayer is the one who is PAYING to do so. Now obviously the library can charge an additional fee (like for a library card) but the majority of them don't.
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:iconferricplushy:
FerricPlushy Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Hobbyist Artist
In my experience, if you donate media to the library (books, movies, music, graphic novels) even if they're missing a book opr it's the next book in a series, they'll just sell it at their next book sale.
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:iconlytrigian:
Lytrigian Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Hobbyist Writer
Public libraries have always been government-funded. That's what makes them public.
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:iconsnuffles11:
snuffles11 Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
When I donated books, I donated them to a branch library that only had a single attendant, so asking her for help was out of the question. However, I also didn't donate several thousand dollars of books, maybe a couple hundred when they were new. I think it was something like 20-30 books? IDK. Just kid stuff and a few older books I no longer needed. Anyway, it wasn't hard, I just dropped them off, she said thanks, and started scanning them in.
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:iconskulkey:
skulkey Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
i'm sure not being allowed to help you carry has something to do with a regulation that came about from people getting injured carrying boxes or something ridiculous like that. it is awfully strict for a library of all places...

as for the rest of your inquiry, i have no idea. haven't set foot in a library in decades.

should the government have a say as to what books are donated? to a reasonable degree, yes. obviously they shouldn't be taking porn, e.g. but textbooks being "too new" is pretty silly.
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:icontehbigd:
tehbigd Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012
There's probably a reason for it. Bedbugs might be a big one (it's quite possible the government bins are designed to kill them, all it takes is around a 105 degree temperature), as it seems like they've become a big library problem.
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:iconscnal:
Scnal Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Celsius or Fahrenheit?
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:icontehbigd:
tehbigd Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012
Fahrenheit. I'm not sure, exactly, if it's 105, but I do know that it's quite easy to kill them with heat and hard to kill them with cold.
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:iconscnal:
Scnal Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thought they'd be able to survive more than that. Seeing as they live off of warm, fresh blood and everything.
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:icontehbigd:
tehbigd Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2012
The problem is that taking care of the eggs takes more heat, along the lines of 130-140%. It's actually quite easy to kill bedbugs with a steamer or hairdryer.
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:iconjackmolotov3:
JackMolotov3 Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
"There's probably a reason for it."

There is definately a reason, and its probably not a good one.
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:iconsvenler:
Svenler Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Professional Photographer
Interesting point, but these were very standard bins with linen linings.
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:icontehbigd:
tehbigd Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012
Hmm. See, I've learned that there's always a reason for rules that seem stupid like this.
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:iconsvenler:
Svenler Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Professional Photographer
There may be a reasonable rule for it, but if there was, none of the volunteers knew what the reason is.
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:icontehbigd:
tehbigd Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012
Which is a problem. One should never just say "a rule's a rule", a short explanation of the reasons for said rule can help immensely.
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:iconslutty-artemis-fowl:
Slutty-Artemis-Fowl Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Student General Artist
...did I type schools? Gah, I meant *and the government should help fund them.
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:iconslutty-artemis-fowl:
Slutty-Artemis-Fowl Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Student General Artist
(not that I don't think the gov. should fund schools more, because they really should)
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:iconslutty-artemis-fowl:
Slutty-Artemis-Fowl Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Student General Artist
That's pretty fucking stupid.
Library's should be able to have whatever books are donated to them, AND the government should help fun schools.
It's like they WANT their citizens to be really fucking dumb.
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