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November 27, 2012
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:iconssensory:
ssensory Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2012   Writer
Two things with this post.

1) Is science a religion in your opinion. If so, then why?

2) Do you think the world is going to end? No, not the Mayan bullshit - science. Science states that every 20,000 years the north and south poles switch to help with something (sorry I don't know the entire thing, but I can link you a few articles) and it caused the Ice Age. This can create a solar storm that can knock out every living creature and/or take us back to the Stone Age.

Here are my opinions -

1) Yes and no. Science has been, in fact, proven wrong at times by being revised (Periodic Table...and many other things). Religion can't always be proven wrong though. There are differences, but science can still seem like a religion in a way.
2)I don't want to believe it, so I'm conflicted as of right now.
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:iconlilium-cruentus:
Lilium-Cruentus Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Lawl, the poles switch all the time from frequencies of maybe hundreds or less to millions of years at random and have never been found to be linked to mass extinctions. As far as I'm aware it has never even been found to have a causal relationship with climate change on any scale, let alone full on ice ages.
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:iconlilium-cruentus:
Lilium-Cruentus Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Or at least thousands, I haven't studied geology in a few years now so I don't remember the exact time scales anymore.
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:iconssensory:
ssensory Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012   Writer
Weird, the article and people in my class (they were seniors and my friends who are serious people) must have the information screwed up I suppose. :nod:
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:iconlilium-cruentus:
Lilium-Cruentus Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
That actually wasn't supposed to sound as rude as it did by the way >.< sorry about that.
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:iconssensory:
ssensory Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012   Writer
That's okay!
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:iconlilium-cruentus:
Lilium-Cruentus Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Presumably. I was taught by some of the world's top geologists and palaeontologists in their fields, so I'd go by what they say really.
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:iconssensory:
ssensory Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012   Writer
Oh, we'll I'm only taught my average teachers, the Internet, and my one friend. (Fact like things) So, I wouldn't hold them to be correct if they aren't the best.
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:iconragerancher:
Ragerancher Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012
No it is not a religion

Yes the world will end but everything else you mentioned there is bollocks. People equate the world ending with humanity dying. If we die before the world ends is hard to say or if the world will end but we won't. Either way, in a few billion years the Sun will become a red giant and destroy the planet.
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:iconssensory:
ssensory Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012   Writer
I meant to say killing off mankind, but it would be the end of the world for us in a sense. I didn't mean for it to be world actually ending because of a new ice age.
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:iconragerancher:
Ragerancher Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012
An ice age certainly wouldn't kill us off. It could drastically reduce our numbers and cause serious havoc but we could survive better than practically any creatures of similar size. Humans can live practically anywhere on the planet, from the desert to Siberia.
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:iconssensory:
ssensory Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012   Writer
I can agree with that. The article said a storm like that can have the power to kill off mankind, but will most likely just knock us back to the Stone Age.
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:iconzcochrane:
ZCochrane Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012  Student Photographer
The fact that science can be proven wrong is the great strength and main feature of it. Science is a process for getting closer to the truth. We form an idea of how the world works, then see whether it is true. If we find something new that contradicts our idea, we replace or change that idea. A religion, meanwhile, has one idea and keeps it forever. So science isn't a religion. Another way to put it: In a religion, knowledge is static, while science is all about changing and expanding knowledge.

As for the end of the world: I don't think so. Those pole reversals might be annoying (although they don't exactly happen on a perfectly fixed schedule), but it'll take more than that to destroy the world.
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:icongreatest-i-am:
Greatest-I-am Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012
It is not to us or science to prove religions wrong.
It is to them to prove they are right just as it is for any scientific claim.

Science cannot prove a negative. Only positives can be proven.
Logical fallacy is the issue.

[link]

Regards
DL
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:iconvanhir:
Vanhir Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012  Hobbyist Writer
1. No.
2. Yes, it's bound to sooner or later. Probably in a few million years or so but it'll happen in time.
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:iconalzebetha:
alzebetha Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012
1. No cause lol.

2. Heat death of the universe.
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:iconbullet-magnet:
Bullet-Magnet Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012
Geomagnetic reversals happen at intervals, called chrons, of between 0.1 and 1 million years, averaging 450 thousand years. The reversal itself takes between 1,000 and 10,000 years to complete. The most recent one, Brunhes–Matuyama reversal, occurred 780,000 years ago.

This is how it's been recently, anyway. In the late Mesozoic it gradually slowed down, until the 40 million year period known as the Cretaceous Superchron, during which there were no reversals at all.

There's no correlation between reversals or excursions (fluctuations in the magnetic field that do not result in a reversal) and ice ages or mass extinctions. the effect on human technology, however, may be more severe.
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:iconacjub:
acjub Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
A key difference between science and Religion is that science doesnt mind being proven wrong. Science simply researches the environment and looks for logical explanations for events. Religion claims to know the answer without using logic.
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:iconssensory:
ssensory Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012   Writer
That is very true. :nod:
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:icongreatest-i-am:
Greatest-I-am Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012
Yes. Strange that they claim to know all the answers but refuses to be questioned on it.

I call that hypocrisy.

Follow and shut the hell up with wanting to know the details.

Regards
DL
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:icontdroid:
tdroid Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012
No, I don't see science as a religion. There are no teachings, no prophets and nothing that cannot be questioned, if you have evidence to back up your claims or can poke real holes in a scientific theory. The fact that science updates itself and rules out mistakes as new information comes up and that what we know now may be wrong makes it hard to call it a religion in my opinion.

Of course the world is going to end, at least this world. If nothing else, the sun will burn out(approx 5 billion years into the future IIRC) and then it would be over for anything that relies on the sun, like the earth. Of course, the human species could easily end up going away a long time before that.
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:iconnenril-tf:
Nenril-Tf Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
The rules of science are similiar to the one of religion, are based on assiomas that you can't show, but their purpose is different, it is only the curiosity of the man that make the science so old and so interesting, so i think that no, the science will never end.
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:iconssensory:
ssensory Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012   Writer
That's what I was thinking along the lines of, which is why I said I could hardly see it in a vague way as a religion. I totally agree. :nod:
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:iconsolum-ipsum:
Solum-Ipsum Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Definitions of terms:

science – natural sciences [link]
religion – respect for what is sacred, reverence for the gods [link]

1) No, but they can relate to each other in a mutually supportive fashion.

2) I'm a bit more profound about that matter.
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
1 - I like saying science is my religion; however, there's no ritual to accompany the faith in empirical data, so I say no.
2 - define 'end' of the world? Do you mean end of humans?
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:iconssensory:
ssensory Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012   Writer
I meant end of humans. Sorry for the confusion.
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
No worries :P

Anyway, I'd say yeah, but it's way distant from me so I don't give a fuck. It might even be through evolution into something different.
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:iconssensory:
ssensory Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012   Writer
Awesome. :nod:
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:iconwolfyspice:
WolfySpice Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2012  Hobbyist Artist
1. No. Science adjusts its views based on what's observed. Religion is the denial of evidence so that belief can be preserved.

2. Other people have already stated the obvious given the eventual fate of our own star. Regarding the poles flipping, that's regarding the magnetic poles. The Earth can very, very slowly change its rotational axis, but nothing like a 'flip'. I do not know what happens when the magnetic poles flip. I think the last one was about 78,000 years ago? I wouldn't think it'd be any worse than a severe solar storm.
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:iconzinc-tails:
Zinc-Tails Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2012  Hobbyist Writer
Science is a process, not a religion. There are however fringe religions built around tech worship.

"Science has been, in fact, proven wrong at times by being revised (Periodic Table...and many other things)" that's the beauty of science, its self-correcting. It thrives on scrutiny and debate. Religion tends to collapse under scrutiny. Not the entire construct mind you, merely certain aspects.


As for the world ending, while I can't comment on the theory you mentioned the world is indeed doomed. One day it will be consumed in the fires of the very star that birthed it.
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:iconultimateridley:
UltimateRidley Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
1) Is science a religion in your opinion. If so, then why?


Science is merely the logical thinker's answer to the way the universe and its various components specifically work, as opposed to the emotional thinker's answer: sentimentalism and Romanticism.

Religion and theism ask a different question: how did we get here, and what created us, if anything? Science is more about details; religion is more about the big picture.

2) Do you think the world is going to end? No, not the Mayan bullshit - science. Science states that every 20,000 years the north and south poles switch to help with something (sorry I don't know the entire thing, but I can link you a few articles) and it caused the Ice Age. This can create a solar storm that can knock out every living creature and/or take us back to the Stone Age.


If the world "ended" every 20,000 years, we would not exist today. Our species, as in Homo sapiens specifically, has been around for a good 200,000 years. That doesn't even consider our hominid ancestors, the earliest notable of which (genus Australopithecus) existed nearly 4 million years ago.

Here's an even better example: based on current evidence, genus Velociraptor lived on Earth for a solid 4 million years. Going by the "reset every 20,000 years" theory, the genus of our favorite inaccurately-depicted Jurassic Park dinosaurs should have been killed off roughly 200 times before actually biting the dust.

Granted, evidence shows that, indeed, the poles may switch every 20,000 or 200,000 years, but based on the above evidence, clearly such an event is not all that devastating. Nor does such an event directly correlate with ice ages; the last ice age has been going on since roughly 2 million years ago, gracefully cut up between periods known as "glacials" and "interglacials" (the latter which we are in right now). Earth has had other ice ages since before the Pleistocene glacial, for example part of the Carboniferous period (that period the public associates with big bugs) probably experienced an ice age given its wildly increased oxygen levels and CO2 levels lower than any other part of Earth history sans the pre-industrial level. However, most geologic periods between the Ediacaran and the Holocene (present) were devoid of any sort of ice age. Therefore, if the 20,000 reset theory causing ice ages holds true across Earth's history, reptiles could never evolve without being warm-blooded, and we would be bowing to our lizard overlords today.

Another thing to note, this being about solar storms: humanity has irrefutably experienced one... in 1859. Apparently it didn't kill anyone, because World History class never spends an entire chapter discussing its ramifications (hell, I'm pretty sure most textbooks don't even mention it). Richard Carrington observed the solar flare that caused the storm, and that solar flare is still the biggest one recorded by science yet, even including flares fired in a direction away from Earth.

Now... our planet will eventually suffer an apocalypse of sorts. But I think it'll be astronomy to turn to for answers there, and I am terrible with astronomy.
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:iconssensory:
ssensory Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2012   Writer
Thank you for the corrections. :nod:
My paraphrasing skills aren't too good. Haha.
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:iconultimateridley:
UltimateRidley Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
No problem, just thought I'd toss a dash of a prehistory lesson into the discussion as I do with everything. :XD:

(I hope I didn't offend you--I tend to get a bit jumpy around fallacies concerning prehistory)
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:iconssensory:
ssensory Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012   Writer
Haha, okay. I obviously don't know everything and I was only trying to say what was said in class and on the Internet. Which doesn't always mean it's true, but the idea did frighten me.

(Nope, you didn't offend at all!)
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:iconsmkiller:
Smkiller Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2012  Hobbyist
"Religion can't always be proven wrong though."

But it's never been proven right either, so, it doesn't necessary need to be proven wrong. =p
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:iconssensory:
ssensory Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2012   Writer
That's true. :la:
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:iconcarusmm:
carusmm Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2012  Hobbyist Writer
Science is the antithesis of religion.

In several billion years time, the world will end.
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:icon2aliens1astronaut:
2Aliens1Astronaut Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2012
1- I don't think science is a religion. To me religion is ignorance or failure to explain certain things. That is not to imply that science hasn't failed us, because it has, but in science there are methods of doing things and in doing so we uncover the nature of "How?" I like to think that religion deals with the "Why?" Humans are highly inquisitive animals and it is only natural to feel special and to feel entitled, or something that pertains to having a purpose. We have always been and will always be bags of flesh. The only thing that separates us from them (animals of the Earth) is our highly evolved brain.

2- The world will end when I die. You will die and as far as you're concerned, the world will go on without you. That is when the world will be at its end, because for you, it has ended.

Humans are but a grain of sand in the great scheme of things (the universe). The only comfort I can offer you is that if something catastrophic were to occur outside of the Earth, it would kill us all before we realize it. Did you know that once in a while the solar system "dips" outside of our galaxy, beyond its protective field, and that the Earth is at the mercy of whatever radiation may come blasting through? Coincidentally, every mass extinction that has ever occurred can be mapped neatly and explained. I noted how an extinction always occurred whenever there was a species at its peak. I suppose that is how long it takes for a life-form on Earth to full develop. The switching of the poles will be a gradual thing and there are steps to prevent the destabilization of our way of life. And besides, there are more terrible ways to go out as opposed to being excommunicated from the world and dying of loneliness. And that's only if you haven't been beaten to a pulp when scavenging for food or ravished by famine.

Now, in regards to the Mayan calendar, you humans are a creative bunch (and easily frightened according to my experiences). The calendar was used to record seasons or time periods. Its ending is not to signify the end of the world, rather it is the end of a season and the beginning of a new one. I'm thinking that it also tells the end in which certain measurements have become obsolete, or at least, the way of doing certain things. It will be a time of rebirth and ingenuity. Humanity will once again be put to the test.

So for now, enjoy your life and pay no mind to the herd.
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:iconincandescentinsanity:
IncandescentInsanity Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2012  Student General Artist
No

If the world "ends" I doubt I'll be around to see it
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:iconfalloutnyw:
FalloutNyw Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2012  Hobbyist Writer
I worship the great CornHolio I sacrifice tp to him everyday for his bunghole
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:iconssensory:
ssensory Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2012   Writer
You are so weird. XDD
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:iconfalloutnyw:
FalloutNyw Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2012  Hobbyist Writer
Long Hair dont care
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:iconssensory:
ssensory Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2012   Writer
XDDD kaykay
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:iconfalloutnyw:
FalloutNyw Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2012  Hobbyist Writer
Love u babe :*
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:iconssensory:
ssensory Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2012   Writer
I love you too. :)
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:iconsaintartaud:
saintartaud Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2012  Professional General Artist
1) Not in itself, no.

2) Well, according to science everything will end eventually.
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:iconssensory:
ssensory Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2012   Writer
I agree with that. :nod:
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:iconkalinka-shadows:
Kalinka-Shadows Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2012
No, science is not religion. There exists conflicts with science an religion that are civilization-ally destructive. Anyone says that science is just another form of religion is being dishonest.

There does exist a conflict between Christianity and Science in the Western world. The result of which is that to preserve it's existence and the way of life for it's followers and future generations, Christian marketers, and dishonest apologists are producing propaganda to say that Science is a false religion.

This is because our detective and archeological work in the real world and our application of technology has proven Christianity (not the existence of gods) false. This is being done because, we now know the claims of the Bible to be false. The claims of the Torah are also false but for different reasons, and the Claims of the Qu'ran are false for different reasons then the above too.

Religion surrounds beliefs in something. Science deals with hard physical evidence.
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:iconssensory:
ssensory Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2012   Writer
I know science isn't a religion and I know science deals with hard physical evidence and everything you told me. I just tried to put it in a way where it kind of appeared religion-like...because I can kind of see it, but hardly...
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:iconkalinka-shadows:
Kalinka-Shadows Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2012
How can you see it? Do you mean false and unproven science? Like Homeopathy?
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:iconssensory:
ssensory Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2012   Writer
Like I said, I mean hardly. People talking about it, having us learn it at school, calling it truth...religions do that but also with that a lot of things can be under the religion category. Like I said, hardly, and I mean hardly.
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