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November 4, 2012
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"If you have nothing to hide, you have nothing to fear"

:iconredmarlin:
redmarlin Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2012
What is your opinion on that statement?

Example: if, say, you didn't let a police officer into your house to conduct a random drug search, and they challenged you by saying you didn't want to let them in because you were, in fact, hiding drugs (even though you aren't), how would you respond?

Remember: if you give in, then they get to invade your privacy, upturn your house, and search through everything you own. If you refuse to let them in, they will most likely get suspicious and will want to investigate further into why you're refusing to cooperate.
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:iconkingstephenarthur:
KingStephenArthur Featured By Owner Nov 5, 2012
like pretty much everything else. there is no solid answer. there can be many different scenarios where this does and does not apply.

However I do know how good of a feeling it is when it DOES apply. lol I was pulled over by a police officer, who stereotyped me and assumed I did drugs or had them on me, he was correct that I did smoke weed at the time, however I did not have any on me, and it felt so good!!!

unrelated to the topic: 5 years sober :dance:
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:iconzcochrane:
ZCochrane Featured By Owner Nov 5, 2012
First of all, this only works if we can trust the government in general and law enforcement in particular to be unbiased, competent, with no hidden agendas, grudges or similar. That is completely unrealistic. In a democracy, everyone has the right (and arguably, to some degree, the duty) to mistrust the government.

Also, the government exists to serve the people, not the other way around. If it wants to infringe on my privacy and my general right to be left alone, then it has to better provide a very good reason for this, and follow a process designed to minimize the risk that I'm being treated unfairly.
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:iconmondu:
mondu Featured By Owner Nov 5, 2012
Only in a perfect world, if the one doing the searching is 100% incorruptible.

Fairly sure everyone who was hung/burned at stake for witchcraft did no such thing. You can toss in the various "communists"/"traitors" during the McCarthy era. And I bet Saddam Hussein was just THRILLED when Iraq was invaded, despite letting in inspectors who never found WMDs.
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:icontdroid:
tdroid Featured By Owner Nov 5, 2012
I think it is stupid. It is an excuse given by people who want to intrude on your privacy. They can investigate me as much as they want, but without a search warrant I won't let them in because I have a right to privacy.

Also, it will be funny when they investigate me and find nothing.
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:iconsiegeonthorstadt:
siegeonthorstadt Featured By Owner Nov 5, 2012
id tell them to do whatever they like except calling my cat fat. cat doesnt like that =_=
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:iconzenarion:
zenarion Featured By Owner Nov 5, 2012  Student Digital Artist
I would be more embarrased by how messy my house is. There's clothes and papers and pens everywhere.
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:iconcarusmm:
carusmm Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2012  Hobbyist Writer
- Have you got a warrant? No, then I am not a boy scout.
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:iconempiredice:
empiredice Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2012
It's poor logic. It doesn't take into account exploitation or guilt complexes. If anything it's a pitch used for exploitation, smooth talking to weasel your way into where you know damn well you have no business getting into. It's a sign that the assumed level of trust its logic relies on has already failed.
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:iconlytrigian:
Lytrigian Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2012  Hobbyist Writer
I would say that just because I have no particular need for a certain right at the moment, that does not mean I should waive it. And I don't care to have my life disrupted by allowing someone in to poke around in all my things.
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:iconredmarlin:
redmarlin Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2012
People! This is a legalities-aside matter. I know the legalities already, I want people's opinions on the scenario and the statement. I had to write the thread out a couple times to explain it the right way, and I forgot to write that part back up. I apologize.
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:iconvelvetfish:
VelvetFish Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2012  Student Filmographer
you do know you can refuse searches, right? (they'll threaten to call the dogs in on you to intimidate you into letting them search, and to see if there are any cracks in your willpower)

but yeah; warrants are only given if there are extreme clues to your house containing contraband. and no amount of police suspicion can overcome the lack of a warrant. (if they search anyways, you can bring that up in court, and they'll dismiss any evidence acquired without permission.)
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:iconredmarlin:
redmarlin Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2012
Read: "legalities aside". I want to know your opinion on the statement in general, not the legalities. I know my rights already.
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:iconvelvetfish:
VelvetFish Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2012  Student Filmographer
i'd say "If i have nothing to fear, then why are you guys here? Besides, you guys have no intention of cleaning up the mess you'll make. warrant or gtfo."

basically, acknowledge other reasons for not condoning searches.
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:iconredmarlin:
redmarlin Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2012
Good point, I never thought of it that way.
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:iconvelvetfish:
VelvetFish Featured By Owner Nov 5, 2012  Student Filmographer
:D
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:icongraywolfshadow:
GrayWolfShadow Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2012  Student General Artist
It's all about trust. If you trust the police to respect your property, to be completely honest about how the search will be conducted, and to in no circumstance take unfair advantage of the situation, then the statement holds true. In reality it's more complex then "im innocent so i'll let them search me" or "im guilty so i won't let them search me" because the officers could use your courtesy to bully, threaten or even frame you.
It's funny how everyone is getting caught up in logistics and ignoring the actual concept.
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:iconredmarlin:
redmarlin Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2012
I know, they seemed to skip the "legalities aside" portion of the introduction.
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:icongraywolfshadow:
GrayWolfShadow Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2012  Student General Artist
so, what do you think on the subject?
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:iconredmarlin:
redmarlin Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2012
Personally, I feel like it shouldn't be used for persuasion. I feel like it's too powerful, and it's too easy to fall into a trap when you're presented with it. It's better not to bring it up.
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:icongraywolfshadow:
GrayWolfShadow Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2012  Student General Artist
agreed :nod:
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:icondj0hybrid:
DJ0Hybrid Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2012  Hobbyist Writer
If they don't have a warrant, which can only be obtained after having reasonable proof, then they don't need to be searching my house. Frankly, everyone has a skeleton in their closet and when the cops actually kind-of know you in person or just in the social world, it is rather hard to stay professional if they accidently find it.

As one investigator in computers put it, never search through your friends' computers because you'll never view them the same way.
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:iconhippo-rim-job:
hippo-rim-job Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2012  Hobbyist Artist
That's not really true. It depends on a number of factors. I doubt a grizzly bear cares if I have anything to hide.
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:iconthesmallqueen:
TheSmallQueen Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2012  Student General Artist
Most people back in the witch trials had nothing to hide, but they still had everything to fear because of paranoia and general ridiculousness.
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:iconstephromancy:
Stephromancy Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2012  Professional Interface Designer
Yeah, they can't search your house without a warrant. Even if they did have one I pretty much agree with the statement, they wouldn't find anything interesting in my apartment. If they searched my computer though, that's a different story. Hundreds of dollars of pirated stuff. :dummy:
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:iconredmarlin:
redmarlin Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2012
Okay, so then let's make it your computer ;) What would you do then?
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:iconreptilliansp2011:
ReptillianSP2011 Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2012  Student General Artist
I'd let them take a look if they have a warrant. In fact, you aren't going to find anything on my computer. There's nothing of interest in here.
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:iconfelissauria:
Felissauria Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2012  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
Without probable cause to obtain a search warrant (which you need to be given the warrant), they can't search your home if you don't allow them. :shrug:
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:iconredmarlin:
redmarlin Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2012
I know, that's why I said legalities aside. My point is that if you say yes, you lose your privacy, if you say no, they get suspicious (I would imagine, at least), so I'm wondering how people would act.
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