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February 9, 2013
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GEDs and the stigma around them?

:iconmegstiel:
megstiel Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2013  Student General Artist
Ok, so as soon as I turn 16 (in about 2 months) I'd like to get my GED and then start taking classes at the college here, and as soon as I'm 18, transfer to another college far far away from here.

I'm kind of unsure about everything, I'm currently being home schooled so dropping out wouldn't really be an issue, I guess I'm more concerned about whether or not colleges would take my GED as opposed to a high school diploma as me being lazy, because I'd still really like to go to a better college.

I also haven't figured out what college this is, but if anyone has any suggestions as to colleges that accepted you with your GED that would be great.

Also, has anyone else done something similar? I'm kind of going into this blind, and I'm going to go talk to the people at the admissions office soon, but if anyone has any valuable input I would greatly appreciate it.

Sorry if this doesn't make any sense, it's late here.
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:iconjonas-lightfoot:
Jonas-Lightfoot Featured By Owner Feb 26, 2013
Don't worry about it, especially if you take a college entrance exam like the ACT/SAT or placement exams. I remember that my highschool refused to give me my diploma, but I scored well on the ACT and the college I go to now let me in. I got my Bachelor's this past year but still don't have a GRE or diploma. :)
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:iconravynnenevyrmore:
RavynneNevyrmore Featured By Owner Feb 26, 2013  Student Digital Artist
I would think that the initiative displayed in getting your GED at 16 would be a plus, not a minus. It's not like you dropped out because you were lazy/wanted to sell drugs, had a kid, and then got your GED at 22 because you want to become a dental receptionist.
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:iconshellbelle92:
ShellBelle92 Featured By Owner Feb 26, 2013
People do generally jump to conclusions about GED's because most of the time, dropouts are the ones who earn them. BUT, homeschooling is a different deal, so you should be fine. Just mention that you were homeschooled in your college essays (I did them 3 years ago, I forget exactly what they're called lol)
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:iconkrylanna:
Krylanna Featured By Owner Feb 11, 2013
Not sure how it works for homeschooled students, but look into taking IB or AP courses. They are for college credit equivalency, even cheaper than community college courses if you pass the first time, and you can start taking them this year. I started off university with about 3 quarters of my core complete and was able to finish up the rest at night school during the summers after I graduated high school. I got my degree in 5 regular semesters, but could have finished in 4 if I were more focused. It ended up about the same as if I'd gone straight to college at 16.

There was also a program my brother did called "Success" (Texas) that allowed him to graduate early. You might look into having your parents work with the local school district to see what options are available to you that do not involve the GED testing, since you're probably not doing traditional courses and credits anyway.
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:iconmegstiel:
megstiel Featured By Owner Feb 11, 2013  Student General Artist
I would probably have to be enrolled in a public high school to do that though, right?

I'll see if there is anything like that in my state, do you know if it was offered through his school or if he found it somewhere else?...
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:iconkrylanna:
Krylanna Featured By Owner Feb 12, 2013
He was enrolled in public school for that program.

I was curious, so I looked up a bit of information on home schooling. Apparently there is no set standard for when you can get your diploma. In most states, your parents issue it when they feel like it, period, end of story. If you're not trying to bypass them to get away from home before they're ready to let you go (which you'd need their permission anyway to take the GED as a minor), you would probably benefit from working with them on this. They can help you dual enroll in community college, or take some college placement tests to attach to your diploma when applying to university as proof you have legitimately finished school early.
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:iconmegstiel:
megstiel Featured By Owner Feb 12, 2013  Student General Artist
Yeah, my dad fully supports me with this so we're going to go to the admissions office next Monday and see what I would need to do because of my age to get accepted.
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:iconkrylanna:
Krylanna Featured By Owner Feb 12, 2013
Glad to hear it! :) Good luck with everything.
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:iconbohobella:
bohobella Featured By Owner Feb 11, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
GEDS just look and sound bad. I never really understood the rush of dropping out, especially so close to graduating anyways. Why give yourself more obstacles later in life? What's the hurry? I wish I could go back in time and enjoy how lax high school was.
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:iconmegstiel:
megstiel Featured By Owner Feb 11, 2013  Student General Artist
I just want to get ahead of things a little bit. :shrug:

What kind of obstacles do you think it would cause later on in life?
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:iconjonas-lightfoot:
Jonas-Lightfoot Featured By Owner Feb 26, 2013
My bad. I don't have a GED or highschool diploma. GRE is a college exit exam (completely different)
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:iconjonas-lightfoot:
Jonas-Lightfoot Featured By Owner Feb 26, 2013
It won't, unless you wind up as a college dropout and a GED is your best accomplishment
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:iconbohobella:
bohobella Featured By Owner Feb 11, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
Well I just feel like the foundation for any getting ahead starts with like, completing things you started. I don't know - I'm not American and have two drop outs for parents who never accomplished things. People in this thread seem very optimistic of the accomplishments of those with GEDs, but I never saw the sense in rushing high school when it's just high school. College isn't going anywhere. But perhaps I just don't fully understand the GED concept. I certainly know it best from the stereotypes as portrayed in American media most of all.
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:iconmegstiel:
megstiel Featured By Owner Feb 11, 2013  Student General Artist
I don't know, I'd probably consider staying if I was attending an actual school, but right now if I stay home schooled until my senior year I don't think I'll gain a lot.
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:iconbohobella:
bohobella Featured By Owner Feb 11, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
I should probably note I'm not American, though. 
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:iconrobotrabbit:
RobotRabbit Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
I could be wrong, but I thought you couldn't "get" you GED until you're 18, even if you passed the test? Or maybe that is just my state.
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:iconmegstiel:
megstiel Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2013  Student General Artist
Nah, where I am it's 16. What state do you live in?
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:iconrobotrabbit:
RobotRabbit Featured By Owner Feb 11, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
California.
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:iconmegstiel:
megstiel Featured By Owner Feb 11, 2013  Student General Artist
Ah.
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:iconmelly4260:
melly4260 Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
Some states have an equivalency test as well as a GED, and it's my understanding you can do either in those states. I was homeschooled & got a GED, took the CLEP tests (college level entry placement) as "No Doves" suggested...first check on GED rules, get to the library or online (not sure) to get the study book for the GED (helpful to know kinda what they expect from you)...I would suggest a Junior College first since you are "unlike other youngsters" and secondly, you are younger than most college freshmen...transitioning is difficult at best...
Personally and from experience, the "high school memories"~prom, football, clubs, and socialization is worthless...If you are determined to make something of yourself, then get educated by whatever means, and get a job...the working world sucks, someone will always be telling you what to do, getting on your nerves, and if you have customer contact...well, they are 90% assholes...but it IS reality, and most likely how you will spend the next 40yrs...
Just sayin'....
:icongrin--plz:
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:iconmegstiel:
megstiel Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2013  Student General Artist
Isn't a GED essentially an equivalency test to a high school diploma, so there's an equivalency test to an equivalency test? :o

I don't think there's a junior college near me, but I know that at the UNM branch in my town there's everywhere from 16 year olds to 85 year olds, so I think I'll do fine. And I'm not going to get any *~high school memories~* being homeschooled so might as well get a little bit ahead. :lol:
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:iconmelly4260:
melly4260 Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
High school equivalency gives you an actual diploma I think...it is different..
A branch is an excellent choice :)
Yah~the only "high school memories" i have is getting my a$$ kicked regularly by some evil chick with long a$$ nails...:iconscaredplz:
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:iconmercury-crowe:
Mercury-Crowe Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2013  Professional Artisan Crafter
My brother dropped out of high school and got his GED, he got a ton of money for college and stuff. I was so mad, if I'd known that was an option I would have done the same thing.

Go for it.
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:icongroundhog22:
groundhog22 Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2013  Professional Filmographer
Put it this way: If they know you're homeschooled, then a GED shouldn't be a stigma. And if they ask you why you have a GED instead of a highschool diploma, just explain the situation to them, and that should work.
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:iconmegstiel:
megstiel Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2013  Student General Artist
Yeah, I hope that they'll look at the reason as to why I'm getting a GED as to just assuming that I dropped out. I just always go to the worst case scenario.
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:iconenuocale:
EnuoCale Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
Take an act test. If you do good in that you can place more emphasis on that than on a college diploma, for entrance letter writing. Any score higher than a 25 and your high school is near irrelevant in relation to how high your score is, unless you literally want like one of the top colleges in existence. And then you'd need a far higher act too.
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:iconmegstiel:
megstiel Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2013  Student General Artist
:nod: I was just talking to a girl I know and she said they don't even care about a GED or high school diploma if your ACT/SAT scores are high, and she's going to Bard. So I should probably start studying.
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:iconcailst:
Cailst Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2013
What's Bard like? I applied there recently and am interested as to what other people think of it.
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:iconmegstiel:
megstiel Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2013  Student General Artist
I haven't done a whole lot of research, but I've heard pretty good things? Nothing very specific about it though.
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:iconenuocale:
EnuoCale Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
I was eager to take it since I was homeschooled highschool too, and got a ged instead of a diploma. Unfortunately I got ~32 in reading and math, but like...

...18 in grammar, because I didn't know what a semicolon was, and just intuitively assumed I'd fit commas wherever I would break when talking out loud, lol.

...and by the time I got to science I literally couldn't stay awake anymore, since I had to wake up at 6:30 to go to it, which was roughly ~4 1/2 hours earlier than I had ever woken up in the four years prior. So a mid level in that, ending with a 27. But I didn't have time to take it again before starting college, and just kind of assumed it was too late to bother worrying about taking it a second time afterwards.
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:iconmegstiel:
megstiel Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2013  Student General Artist
:lol: Yeah, I'm not entirely sure testing is the best way to judge intelligence, but it is a good skill to have.

If it makes you feel any better, Kurt Vonnegut said that there is no reason to use a semicolon other than to show your professor that you know how to use one.
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:iconchunky-salsa:
Chunky-Salsa Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2013
well, one teacher i knew got a GED and he ended up getting a master's degree and is gonna teach at a university. so.. a GED doesn't limit you imo. you can get that, and go to community college 2 years and transfer to a large university? a lot of people i know do that and it saves them a LOT of money if you have financial strains and they still end up with a good degree! so yeah!! good luck!! there's nothing wrong with a GED as long as you get a university degree!
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:iconmegstiel:
megstiel Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2013  Student General Artist
Ok, well I hope that is not an exception because if not then that is good news for me.

I don't know if I would go to a community college because the closest one is in Santa Fe and that would require pretty much moving there... but the college here is super cheap for residents.
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:iconcorvalian:
Corvalian Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2013
Stigma shmigma. If a college accepts you, you're in. There are way too many people going to that college for them to care after that, so I'm not sure what kind of stigma you're really worried about. If a college you really want to go to won't accept you with the GED, I'd ask them if they would accept you as a transfer student if you could produce transcripts from another college, and what credits would carry over. In many cases this is the best option financially since some colleges (community colleges for instance) are easier/cheaper/more convenient and are better for getting all of your general credits done and then transferring to a more specialized program at a different school that accepts the credits you've earned.

The only thing that would really be 'weird' about it at all is just going to college at 16. If any dudes hit on you just make sure to tell them that. :P
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:iconmegstiel:
megstiel Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2013  Student General Artist
Well I'm more worried about not getting accepted because of the GED. I know that they say that they'll accept it since it's the equivalent of a high school diploma, but I've been told that some colleges think of it as the easy way out and being lazy.

I have a really good feeling that the college in my current state will accept me, but I'm just worried about after that when I turn 18. So I guess that would mean that I would be transferring, in that case would they still look at your high school scores and stuff?

:lol: I'm so bad at telling when guys are hitting on me, but I'm pretty reserved so it's usually not much of a problem.
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:iconcorvalian:
Corvalian Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2013
I doubt most colleges are going to deny you for having a GED unless you're applying to some world renowned, prestigious institution like Harvard or something. The truth is that most colleges just want your money, and they'll let people in with mediocre high school grades or GED's, respectively, as long as they have reason to believe they're committed to it and know what they're getting into. I think most state universities are actually receiving some funds from tax payers as well, and are required to be a little more lenient.

I was a transfer student to the University I'm attending now. When I transferred all they asked for was my transcripts from my previous college. If you're worried about it though you can contact the college you're planning to transfer to and see if they need that or not. I'd be really surprised if a place denied you for having a GED if you've got excellent grades in the institution you're transferring from. That just wouldn't make much sense.
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:iconmegstiel:
megstiel Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2013  Student General Artist
While I'd like to think I could go Ivy league, I'm just going to try to keep things realistic for now. :/

I should also probably mention that because my family is poor as fuck, I would have to have some financial aid and win some scholarships somehow.

Ok, that makes sense and I feel a lot better about it now.
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:iconcorvalian:
Corvalian Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2013
I didn't mean to say that you definitely wouldn't make it into ivy league, but just that they typically require more than a GED to my knowledge. There might be some kind of scholarship out there that would get you into one, but you'd either have to 'win' it (like you said) or earn it by doing something non-highs school related. If you do some research on it you might find something.
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Hahaha, my mom was like YOU GON' BE RAPED and I was like 'mother, it's statutory for TWO MORE YEARS' :lol:
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:iconcorvalian:
Corvalian Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2013
Rape? Ain't nobody got time for dat!
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Considering where I went, this is pretty much true of the students :laughing: but we did have a 'rape statue'!
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:iconcorvalian:
Corvalian Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2013
You had a sculpted monument dedicated to rape at your school?
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
No, just a shady unsafe statue. One of my friends got mugged near there. :P
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:iconcorvalian:
Corvalian Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2013
Ohhh okay. So someone got raped over by it?
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
I think just a common place for rapes and shit. :I
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(1 Reply)
:iconno-doves-fly-here:
no-doves-fly-here Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2013
I went this route when I was 16. The college I attended was highly supportive of the path I chose, as were my classmates.
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:iconmegstiel:
megstiel Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2013  Student General Artist
Did you end up graduating early by skipping a couple grades or did you get your GED?
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:iconno-doves-fly-here:
no-doves-fly-here Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2013
I got my GED. Afterwards I took a college placement test, which is what you really need to focus on preparing for. Personally I scored 100's on most subjects, and I scored in the high 90's on the test that covered algebra, geometry, calculus and the likes. As a result I was able to skip about 70% of my college prerequisites. On top of that I was able to sign wavers which allowed me to skip even more courses.

Do not misinterpret this as an easy route, however. Being given a full load of intermediate or advanced college courses with no transitional stage is absolute hell, especially if you are working part-time. I nearly failed a few courses my first semester because I underestimated the workload.
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:iconmegstiel:
megstiel Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2013  Student General Artist
Ok, cool. That makes sense. And is helpful.

I'm not really doing it to take an easy route, more like wanting to get a little bit ahead in life. I think I could probably handle the workload, since my workplace right now is very very understanding and flexible, and I'm very part-time. But thanks for the heads up!
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:iconopiumrooster:
opiumrooster Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2013
can't you call the colleges and ask if they accept people with geds. i imagine it won't be a problem since you're homeschooled because they want as much diversity as possible but i wouldn't really know.
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