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January 2, 2013
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How do I talk to my dad about this?

:iconkinoc-kun:
Kinoc-Kun Featured By Owner Jan 2, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
So here's the thing, I really want to go into the Air Force after I finish college. From what my dad has told me, people with college degrees have a wider range of jobs they can get into in the service.

I'm absolutely 100% sure that this is what I want to do with my life, that or the National Guard, and I want to make my dad proud of me and better myself physically and mentally.

The problem is that my dad has always been against me going into the military because I've never been very "tough." (I have a an abnormally low pain tolerance despite how strong I am.) He doesn't think I could handle it, but this is something I really want to do.

How can I talk to my dad about this without him getting upset or trying to talk me out of it?
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:icondetective-inspector:
Detective-Inspector Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
If going into the military is your desire then do it. It's your life to make. My family when I was young were against my decision of going into law enforcement because it was a dangerous job, but I did it anyway because it was my passion and I wanted to serve. Get a reason to join and do your best is all I can say, but I will be proud to have another dedicated being in our air force.

Also ignore the bozzo under me because he/she doesn't know what he is talking about.
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:iconkinoc-kun:
Kinoc-Kun Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
I really want to be like my dad and go into the air force. He flew planes, ran security for bases, worked on weapons and vehicles, the dude was a boss. I just hope I can do half the things he did.
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:icondetective-inspector:
Detective-Inspector Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
It's good to model yourself after your father, but also make it your own too. History doesn't like repeats! I hope that if you do decide to go in that you do so, bravely, and proud.
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:iconvulpimo:
Vulpimo Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2013
Think it over. Military brains aren't actually the smartest fishes in the pond, and you will have to work with people who couldn't finish any good school
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:iconkinoc-kun:
Kinoc-Kun Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
Ha...haha... You really don't know how much physical and mental training goes into the military, do you? Lets see you work on nuclear technology or space programs. How bout flying a plane or working out strategy in the field.

That sounds like a pretty smart fish to me.
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:iconvulpimo:
Vulpimo Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2013
Actually, physical training does apply to military.

As for the mental side- 90% of the training is about killing the thoughts and dragging instincts in the place. Every repetitive action is about that. To stop thinking about it and do it mechanically. Because in the combat situation, most of the people freak out when they have to think about anything. So instead, the military relies on instincts, which are quick and reliable. They can be taught, and that's the difference. You can't make a dumb person into a great strategist, but you can stuff him with some reactions which you consider right in a certain situation.

As for flying a plane or working out strategy- flying a plane applies here too. Hours in simulators and hours of training the same things. Remember- As you perform something over and over and over, you stop thinking about it and do it mechanically.

Working out a strategy- people in the field just follow taught patterns, it's HQ that comes up with everything related to logistics.

And military people are one of the lowest IQ bearers among people, sad but true.
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:iconmetalhartrockandroll:
metalhartrockandroll Featured By Owner Jan 6, 2013
You could always do something to show him he's wrong. If he thinks you're a wuss, maybe hit the gym and bulk up a bit, show him you're serious.

Then bring it up.
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:iconkinoc-kun:
Kinoc-Kun Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
I've been working out non-stop the past 2 weeks. I wanna be ripped when I go. Lol
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:iconmetalhartrockandroll:
Good for you!
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:iconnocturn0wl:
Nocturn0wl Featured By Owner Jan 6, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Have you thought about doing Air Force ROTC? It would allow you to get a college education and start a career in the military at the same time. It would help you pay for college to boot, if money's a concern (and even if it isn't. Scholarships are fantastic, regardless!). Plus, if I'm remembering my facts correctly, your first two years in an ROTC program are sort of like a trial run, where you're not really beholden to anything or anyone if you decide that the military life isn't right for you after all (though if you drop out, I think you do have to pay them back whatever tuition they've paid for you so far).

Don't take my word for it though, because what little I can say about the program off the top of my head may not be entirely accurate. But still, it might be something that could serve as a happy medium between you and your dad, since you want to join the military but he's not so sure you'll do well.
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:iconkinoc-kun:
Kinoc-Kun Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
Well my original plan IS to get a college degree before signing up.
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:iconnocturn0wl:
Nocturn0wl Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Which you can definitely do, if that's how you want to do it. I just thought that you might be interested in ROTC because it combines your two goals--getting a college degree, and starting a career in the military. If you did join an ROTC program, you wouldn't get commissioned and sent somewhere until you're done with your degree, so you wouldn't have to worry about that if that's part of your concern. And you can still choose whatever major you like; they don't tell you what you can and can't study.

Either way, it's just an idea, and food for thought. I just thought you might be interested in hearing about a viable alternative to your original plan so you can make a more informed decision about how you're going to go about achieving your goals. :shrug:
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:iconrockstarvanity:
RockstarVanity Featured By Owner Jan 3, 2013   Photographer
I think just be really open to any questions or concerns he might have - it sounds like if he does try to put you off, it's because he'd worried that it's not the right choice for you. If it's what you want to do though, and you've given it lots of consideration (sounds like you have!) then just let him know the situation and give him time to come to terms with it. Best of luck!
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:iconkinoc-kun:
Kinoc-Kun Featured By Owner Jan 3, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
$17 thousand. Sorry, I'm still asleep
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:iconkinoc-kun:
Kinoc-Kun Featured By Owner Jan 3, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
Yeah, this is something I've been thinking about for a long time. I spent the majority of last night doing research on Basic Training, careers, and benefits. Turns out Basic is a lot shorter than most branches (being only 8 and a half weeks) and you get so many career paths. You actually START at little over $17 a year once you're in the service. That's twice what I make already. :)
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:iconresident-bishounen:
Resident-Bishounen Featured By Owner Jan 3, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I was going to suggest researching first - you can also talk to a recruitment office for more info. That way you can show your Dad that you're serious, and that you'll have career paths in your field. Be prepared, though, if the process in the US is like what it is in Canada, it could take a while from when you apply to when you leave for Basic.
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:iconkinoc-kun:
Kinoc-Kun Featured By Owner Jan 3, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
I have been researching, and I know that I want to go into one of three careers. Logistics, Security, or Medical. I'm really leaning towards Security because that way I'll be guaranteed to go overseas for a little while and it's not as much training after basic.
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:icon290pika:
290Pika Featured By Owner Jan 2, 2013  Student Filmographer
You're allowed to do what you want with your life. :nod:

Maybe say something along the lines of, "Hey, dad, I've made my decision and I want to join the Air Force/National Guard. I understand that you have not been a fan of the idea. However, this is what I want to do with my life." You really can't stop him from getting upset or disagreeing, though. :shrug:

I told my mom I wanted to go into Art/Animation as opposed to Electrical/Computer Engineering, and she freaked out for about a day or two (she didn't want me to be a starving artist living in a box), and then accepted my decision.
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:iconpicturefragments:
picturefragments Featured By Owner Jan 2, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Just do it. Talk about it after basic.
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:iconebolabearvomit:
EbolaBearVomit Featured By Owner Jan 2, 2013
You tell your father you're joining the military (and that's final). It's YOUR life, it's your decision, it's your responsibility. He can object all he wants, it's not his choice. It's your choice, so own it.
If you live your life only by seeking approval of others you'll be an empty sad shell of a person.

Don't listen to that shit about degrees. You can join and still get somewhere without a degree.
Plus you get the GI Bill and some colleges will pay your tuition once/if you leave the service after your initial commitment.

Drexel in Philadelphia was paying veterans tuition AND dorm fees AND gave them cafeteria lunch plans.

Plus, it's only 4 years. It's not like you're going to be old or anything. You'll still have your whole life a head of you regardless of the experience.
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:iconkinoc-kun:
Kinoc-Kun Featured By Owner Jan 3, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
True, I'm only 19. :)
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:iconebolabearvomit:
EbolaBearVomit Featured By Owner Jan 6, 2013
See! You have plenty of time.
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:iconkinoc-kun:
Kinoc-Kun Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
I suppose so
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:icontacosteev:
tacosteev Featured By Owner Jan 2, 2013  Hobbyist
There is more to do in the military than being a grunt. I'd just call him up and tell him your plans. You're an adult and can make your own decisions. Your dad will be proud of you no matter what you do I bet.
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:iconxranberry:
Xranberry Featured By Owner Jan 2, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I feel you ;~;
Sorry I don't think I can help you coz I don't like giving advice to someone though we have the same situation.
But allow me to share you mine. *sips a cup of tea*

My dad is against what I wanted to do, he doesn't trust me, he doesn't believe that I can do things like this and that coz I am weak and small and he raised me like a prince/princess. Talking to him about it is possible but, making him agree without feeling upset or angry is impossible. It was no use convincing him for most of the dads have their own "pride". So I ran away and started living on my own to pursue my dreams.
But before that I questioned myself:

-Do you want to regret something in the future?
-Do you want to feel resentment for the rest of your life towards someone for not allowing you to do something you like?
-Are you sure you can prove yourself someday?
-If I let go of this chance, will there be another one? And how long will I have to wait for the next one?
-Can you stand up on your own?
-Does your life really belongs to you?

So after thinking twice and thrice I've made up my mind. I don't care about what he feels and thinks anymore coz I believe the day will come that he will recognize me. And I will do my best to make that happened.

PS: I'm not telling you to do the same. Well then, good luck on convincing your dad! I hope that he will not feel upset about it.
:iconhappywaveplz:
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:iconjuliabohemian:
Juliabohemian Featured By Owner Jan 2, 2013
Well you don’t need his permission if you are 18. So the best thing would be to make the decision and begin the process and then let him know what you are doing. Don’t approach him as though you are seeking approval. Approach him as though you are letting him know. Whether or not he has a positive attitude about it is his choice and should not affect your decision.
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:iconkinoc-kun:
Kinoc-Kun Featured By Owner Jan 3, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
I know, but my dad's wishes are still important to me. I want him to be supportive of me going into the military like he did.
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:iconjuliabohemian:
Juliabohemian Featured By Owner Jan 3, 2013
But what if he isn’t? It’s your life. Are you going to live it for him? What happens in 20 years when you’re miserable because you made choices based on what he wanted?
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:iconlytrigian:
Lytrigian Featured By Owner Jan 2, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
The Air Force is not the Marines, and a great many jobs in that service are technical, or otherwise involve sitting at a desk. This is not particularly painful.
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:iconkinoc-kun:
Kinoc-Kun Featured By Owner Jan 3, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
The Air Force has a lot of combat in it as well. Security Forces, Pararescue, Aerial Gunner, EOD, and that's just to name a few. Don't believe the all stereotypes of "Air Force is a desk job."
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:iconlytrigian:
Lytrigian Featured By Owner Jan 3, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
It's not just a stereotype. It's MOST people I know in the AF.
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