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December 31, 2012
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Where to begin with improving.

:icongrimmkyu:
Grimmkyu Featured By Owner Dec 31, 2012  Student Digital Artist
Hi guys. Been a Deviant for a year now, and I to be honest, I've slowed down a LOT these last few months in terms of drawing and improving. I want to spend 2013 fully focusing on art and improvement, and well, to be honest. I have no idea where to begin. I usually sit here with my tablet out, blank, doodling a few lines every so often and I end up just getting depressed, laying down, and not touching it for 4-5 days because of being scared it will happen again.

But well, I don't plan on doing that today. But nothing has come for hours upon hours, and I think I need to take legitimate steps, like studying sort of stuff. But hell, I know it's probably weak of me to come here, but screw it - I need help with where I should start.

Also, I'm heavily inspired and I thoroughly enjoy anime/manga style art, and as such that's what I want to be able to do myself.
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:icontsuruginomai:
TsurugiNoMai Featured By Owner Dec 31, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
first you need to change your mindset of all the negativity. i know its easier said than done, but thats part of the problem. second, inspiration. i turned to walt disney. [link] <--- buncha quotes

also, do not. i repeat: DO NOT force it. ive had this problem for years. staring blankly and blank spaces hoping something will come up. dont. it wont happen. do it when it feels right. carry a small sketchbook, notepad and pencil, pen, crayon everywhere and i mean EVERYWHERE. you may even meet people who will show you a trick or two! i was at a bar once and decided i wanted to draw. the people next to me would not leave me alone!

write ideas down, keep in notes on your cell, take pictures ect. my iphone is now my art tool. filled with notes and pictures and such. when the time is right i pull them all out and slowly create something.

take your favourite artist and study them. dont be them, study. learn how and what they did and how they got there.

do a once a day sketch thing. they have one a day sketch diaries (kinda expensive) or keep a separate sketch a day journal. draw on everything. start small and work your way up (ie; draw a whole page of eyes, a whole page of mouths). dont get rid of any drawing even if it sucks.

youtube has lots of free tutorials as well.

most of all, NEVER GIVE UP.
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:icongrimmkyu:
Grimmkyu Featured By Owner Jan 1, 2013  Student Digital Artist
As I'm sure you've read at some point, I've been in the art-world for about a year now. Thank you very much for taking the time to respond, and I feel that this is very very helpful. I sort of do most of the things you have suggested to a lesser extent. I don't have a cell phone, but I do find and fill up my computer with lots of pictures and the like. And I would say one of my favorite artists would have to be *ClearEchoes , so I suppose I'll study him.

But really, thanks. It does really help. I agree with you with that final bit to no end, though I wish I'd follow it more often (though I will say, no matter what happens. I will /never/ give up.)
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:icontsuruginomai:
TsurugiNoMai Featured By Owner Jan 1, 2013  Student Traditional Artist
youre very welcome :)

good luck in your endevours
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:iconnataliebee:
NatalieBee Featured By Owner Dec 31, 2012
Take baby steps, and work in "sections." What would you like to work on, specifically? Hand & feet, animals? Focus on the basic shapes. Master those first. Then gradually push yourself just a little more until you're confident that you've got it. Do the same with other mediums, and condition yourself to knowing how it "feels" to control your tools. Remember--we're our own worst critic sometimes! You may notice flaws that other people don't.
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:iconthe-uglytruth:
The-UglyTruth Featured By Owner Dec 31, 2012
If you want to become a better artist, niching yourself right off the hop is detrimental. Do still life, do art nouveau, do cubism and fauvism. Just because you want to do manga doesn't mean that you can't learn from different practices.

Become concrete in your knowledge of anatomy, design and colour theory. You have to know the rules to break them, especially with something like anime. By breaking down the components of really astounding art you are better able to replicate it and mold it to your needs. Break out of your shell and Recreate the Mona Lisa, the Girl with the Mandolin, and so forth.


The problem with a lot of young, enthusiastic artists is that they want instant gratification. It takes time and blood to be great at something.
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:icongrimmkyu:
Grimmkyu Featured By Owner Dec 31, 2012  Student Digital Artist
Responding to what you've said here,

I'm sorry; I've been immersed in art and whatnot for a year and 2 months now, so I'm still 'new' sort of. And I don't try to sentence myself to only doing one form of art - Like say, I don't want to do just manga, but because out of all the forms/styles moreover of art, I like it the most, and as such want to improve in that more than the others.

I've heard many say that, also. The rules bit. You need to know how to draw a human realistically before you can draw them in the style of manga; Which of course differs from reality.

I'm only 18 years old myself, and I don't necessarily want to be able to just knock out picture after picture after picture with minimal effort cause "i'm just that awesome lololooll!!" but I sometimes get into these slumps of uninspiration due to minor to major problems/flaws that I notice about things. I do agree with you, though. It definitely takes time. The major 'God-tier' artists have been in it for many many years.

One of which I admire, named Sayori started out pretty poorly (subjectively) in the early 2000's, improved slightly in 2001, 2002 was better, but still lacking, but then 2003 onward, just amazing amounts of improvement. So I believe that I can do it, I just was trying to learn what the ladder was exactly before I start climbing it, if that makes sense.
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:iconshininginthedarkness:
I second the drawing book thing. Most libraries have a decent selection. Go for something general, not for something specifically on drawing people or whatever. It'll take out the temptation to get online browse for the 'right' tutorial. Just get a book, and sit and work on it from cover to cover (not in one day of course).

Also, your stuff is going to look really bad at first. That's OKAY. Everyone goes through that.
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:icongrimmkyu:
Grimmkyu Featured By Owner Dec 31, 2012  Student Digital Artist
I've been immersed in art for a year. I don't believe that everything you make will /HAVE/ to be bad, also. I mean, it's a fact that artists see their own work worse than others do.

Oh, and also - My library seriously doesn't have any books like it. Everything is horridly disorganized, and I'd asked a librarian to help me locate art books, and she said they didn't keep them there for whatever reason and that she was sorry.
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:iconshininginthedarkness:
Ok, it doesn't HAVE to be bad, but there's an excellent chance a lot of it will be, and people use that as an excuse to just not do it, or the fear manifests itself as procrastination.

Well, that's the worst library ever! Let me see what I have in free e-book form. Well, these are all from 1900.

[link]
[link]
[link]
[link]

So I don't know how much they'll help.
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:icongrimmkyu:
Grimmkyu Featured By Owner Dec 31, 2012  Student Digital Artist
It really is a terrible library. Hell, there's even a comic book store that sells books for drawing..
.
..
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At a staggering $50-$100 USD, and it's mainly for comic book style superheroes, which I'm just missing the part of the brain that cares about them. But there is manga style, but it's all about drawing buildings and whatnot. I dunno about you, but I don't think skyscrapers = what I had in mind.

Either way though, I appreciate the support. Whether or not you truly helped me out, I'm very thankful for your time.
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