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December 8, 2012
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Is there much point in creating things designed to be used which actually never are?

:iconjubalbarca:
JubalBarca Featured By Owner Dec 8, 2012   Writer
This is an issue I've been struggling with.

I'm someone who has an instinctive tendency to take up projects of various sorts, and I help run a web community which hosts a lot of them. Keeping activity going regarding any of them is a constant struggle though, and it gets very disheartening. I do, at a fundamental level, enjoy creating these things, but at the same time part of that is in the idea of creating things communally or at least with some level of communal interest. For example, designing a pen and paper RPG. It could be the most meticulously designed setting with the sleekest ruleset in the world, but if nobody has any interest in it is there really much point? This rather nags at me, and the website's tanking a bit in terms of activity at the moment, and I'm feeling pretty tired after my first term of university, and it's making me feel very bleak about these various hobbies of mine.

I'm aware this doesn't sound a terribly serious issue, but given the amount of myself I put into the site and my projects it is, it's a large enough part of my life that failing at it actually does adversely affect my general outlook on things, ability to work, positivity when talking to friends, and so on.
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:iconebolabearvomit:
EbolaBearVomit Featured By Owner Dec 8, 2012
I think you need to decide on what you need for your life to be healthy and happy before worrying about trying to babysit a community of people that have very few things in common.

Maybe focus on projects that you approve of and let the ones you're not confident in do it on their own or fade away.
Pick and choose how you employ your time. It is YOUR TIME after all.

Honestly, I think your loyalty is misplaced and you're taking the situation too seriously. You're investing too much of yourself in the site and it's projects and you get next to nothing in return.

Re-evaluate what is important to you and how to get there. After that it's just a matter of you making the changes you need made to move forward.

It's not greedy or disingenuous if you pull back and commit less time to projects.
You have to remember, the members of that community probably are not thinking in the same way you are.
They're just going to float through and do what they like or what they want and screw the rest.
They put in the time they want to and move on.
But you're too attached and cannot be as casual in your approach.

For instance, when was the last time someone put as much effort and interest in you and your projects as you have done for so many others?
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:iconwolfos96:
wolfos96 Featured By Owner Dec 8, 2012  Hobbyist Writer
Very few people have played my levels in Little Big Planet, but I still enjoy making them. Few people read my stories, yet I still enjoy writing them. If you simply enjoy creating something, then the creation is its purpose in itself. if you're doing it for recognition, then some advertising may be needed. I'd just say to keep working, because someone down the road will eventually use it and may even love it.
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:iconebolabearvomit:
EbolaBearVomit Featured By Owner Dec 8, 2012
Yes but that's your work. Your time.
This person is involved in other's work and time and cooperation.
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:iconjubalbarca:
JubalBarca Featured By Owner Dec 8, 2012   Writer
I mostly do it for the joy of creating it, but in creating the sorts of things I make... I never, or rarely ever, create things which are really meant for me, and it's disheartening seeing one's work rusting by the wayside or even sitting perfect on a shelf when what it was really meant for was to be used.
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:iconwikidtron:
Wikidtron Featured By Owner Dec 8, 2012  Professional Artist
Why not find a larger community to join, one that has more traffic, where your projects would actually get some more attention?
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:iconjubalbarca:
JubalBarca Featured By Owner Dec 8, 2012   Writer
Partly a sense of loyalty and responsibility to my own community, a lot of it a sense of how long it takes to fit into more online communities... I mean, I join other places and talk about my stuff, but generally internet forum users assume that anyone with a post count below 500 can't possibly have anything interesting to say, and with the number of things I'm trying to work on it's really hard to physically split my time enough to be an active member of... to cater for all my projects, I'd be looking at maybe 20 or so sites? I'm at a particularly notably intensive university, so between that and my degree it'd more or less kill me.

But yeah, it seems to be hard to find places where it's not the case that unless you're "in the in crowd" talking much about your own projects is simply ignored. That and how many sites I'd need to work on if I hosted each project on a different one. And as long as I host my projects on my own site (I say my own just because in internet terms I consider it "home", it's run by a member-democracy) it's obviously even harder to plug them anywhere else because people don't trust what they don't know.
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:iconwikidtron:
Wikidtron Featured By Owner Dec 8, 2012  Professional Artist
It seems pretty pointless to maintain loyalty to an entity that is not even putting an effort into returning the amount of energy you put into it. When things aren't working out despite your honest best efforts, it's time to move on.
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:iconjubalbarca:
JubalBarca Featured By Owner Dec 8, 2012   Writer
As I said though, I genuinely don't know of another site/community where I'd fit in that I could use as a suitable base for developing all the different things I'm working on. That's one of the primary things - the site's also been a largish part of my growing up, and has helped me cope with some difficult patches by providing a secondary mental home, so I guess that's where the loyalty bit comes from.
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:iconwikidtron:
Wikidtron Featured By Owner Dec 8, 2012  Professional Artist
Even though something may have served you in the past, it's obviously not anymore. It's silly to cling to something that's not doing anything for you- that's why you're having these feelings of futility.

It might be time to make some major changes in your life- hobbies that you once loved are apparently no longer bringing you joy- so maybe it's time to find some new hobbies. It seems to me you want something that also fills your need for social interaction. Perhaps finding some real-life activities is in order?
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:iconjubalbarca:
JubalBarca Featured By Owner Dec 8, 2012   Writer
I do have a fair few real-life activities and social interactions - I was trying not to broaden this thread out into the rest of my life and rather focus on this specific issue... as you say, it may be silly to cling to one specific community for the hobbies I do, but there's still the issue of the lack of a better option. I don't think switching hobbies is really the answer either, I have a fairly diverse range of hobbies as it is and I'm the sort of person who, whilst I'll struggle if I feel a project is going badly, will generally take much more of a hit from simply walking away from it and the work and time and effort I've put in.

I mean, you may be right and I should just walk away from all of this, but unless I was really pretty sure I was going to find something much more fulfilling I'm loath to consider all my efforts fundamentally a waste.
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