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February 12, 2013
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What is your FAVORITE lens, and why? :)

:icontdphotodesigns:
tdphotodesigns Featured By Owner Feb 12, 2013  Professional Photographer
Everyone has their own preferences, which I think is awesome!
I just wonder how different everyone is from eachother:D
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Devious Comments

:iconemblemata:
Emblemata Featured By Owner Mar 2, 2013
I have to lenses I like very much.
The Canon 50 1.4
and
the Canon 85 1.8
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:iconannemayra:
AnneMayra Featured By Owner Mar 1, 2013
EF-S60mm f/2.8 Macro USM,, It takes nice macro photo's, duh.. ;)
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:iconstudio-toffa:
studio-toffa Featured By Owner Feb 27, 2013  Professional Photographer
I would say I hold a button on my Tamron SP 28-75mm f2.8 because of it's all-round nature, but it's not perfect, that's why I also pack more lenses.
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:icongeorgewjohnson:
georgewjohnson Featured By Owner Feb 26, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
My Canon 24-70mm f/2.8L!

If you'll indulge me for a moment...

As you reach a certain level you start to learn all the little foibles that you have to learn to get the best out of your kit. After 18 months with my 24-70 I feel I know that lens inside and out, I know how far to push it, I know what it can and can't do. I know without even looking through it whether it will work for the scene I'm looking at. I know what it feels like, in wind, rain, heat or cold. I know exactly what focal length it's on simply by feeling the barrel turn in my hand. I have a couple of other Canon lenses and I know what they can do but somehow I have to work a little harder with them than the 24-70!

I am perfectly normal and sane most of the time, just ask my pack of pink giraffes, they'll confirm it! :LOL:
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:icontdphotodesigns:
tdphotodesigns Featured By Owner Feb 24, 2013  Professional Photographer
Such great replies, I enjoy reading everyone's responses. :)
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:iconalbinogrimby:
AlbinoGrimby Featured By Owner Feb 18, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I like my f/1.8 35mm prime lens for my Sony dSLR. It's actually pretty great for getting close up shots of toys -- images look tack sharp. I use it in lieu of an actual macro lens. Also the 35mm lens was cheap -- about 120 bucks compared to 600 for a a sony macro. I realize I could probably spend about 100-200 on ebay to get a Minolta macro since it uses the same alpha ring, but I'm crazy lazy.

Don't get me wrong, I still want a macro and some other lenses, but this gets the job done. :)
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:iconshaymincutie:
shaymincutie Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
Macro Zoom lens- because my favorite thing to photograph is macro, showing tiny details of a larger thing, like petals on a flower etc. Plus its just awesome. :D
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:iconrockthesky:
rockTheSky Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
Does anyone here use/own the Nikon 24-70mm f2.8? I am planning on purchasing this lens within the next 3 months.
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:iconrcooper102:
rcooper102 Featured By Owner Feb 18, 2013
I don't own one personally but they are pretty damn good lenses. I would suggest looking into the Tamron varient though as it has stabilisation that the on brand ones do not.

On a side note though I am a big advocate of using primes over zooms unless you need the versatility of not having to switch lenses. (which very few people actually do)

For example you could either get:

Nikon 24-70 F2.8 : ~$1900 US (900 grams)

or you could get:

Nikon 20mm F2.8 : ~$500 (270 grams)
Nikon 35mm F2.0 : ~$330 (205 grams)
Nikon 50mm F1.4G : ~$400 (280 grams)
Nikon 85mm F1.8G : ~$400 (350 grams)

Total: ~$1630 (1105 grams)

With the primes you cover a wider focal range for less money with as sharp or sharper lenses that are almost all faster. Also if you drop one and break it, you have 3 others still to use while one is at the repair shop. If you drop the 24-70 then you are crippled until it comes home. (i learned this lesson the hard way, when when I first got into photography I invested in a single, expensive, zoom) Carrying all 4 at once is only 200 grams heavier and if you opt to only carry 3/4 at any given time (since you can probably tell ahead of time what you need) you actually end up with a lighter bag. Also since you have a lighter lens on your camera it will be easier to take stable photos and your neck won't be as sore carrying the lens around.
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:iconrockthesky:
rockTheSky Featured By Owner Feb 27, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
Sorry for late response. I think you make a very convincing case and I had considered getting at least a 35mm and a 50mm to start off with (instead of OR as well as the 24-70 f2.8).

I think for me though, the worry of dropping lenses is almost a non-factor. I've owned a DSLR and several lenses for 7 years now. 1 is a cheap Nikon 18-55mm kit lens, and the other an equally cheap 55-200mm and the third, a 170-500mm Sigma lens. Also got a 50mm prime this year. I'm proud to say that I've never dropped any one of them. Even though the two Nikon's are quite cheap I always take great care of them. So I'm definitely going to be extra careful with a 1000+ pound (GBP) lens. Incidentally, if I were to go with the 24-70mm, it would be the only lens I'd own for quite some time, so I wouldn't be taking it off the body for a while. Buying 4 separate prime lenses actually increases the chance of dropping one.

I'm getting quite serious about landscape photography now and I always shoot on a tripod in order to use ISO 200 as much as I can, so I'm not so interested in optical stabilization for the 24-70 zoom range.

But I'm not shooting your post down. I definitely did consider more lenses over just the one. I'm not completely decided even now, but currently the zoom is my favorable choice.
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:iconrcooper102:
rcooper102 Featured By Owner Feb 27, 2013
Well to be honest, dropping a lens is not really the chief cause of damage. Usually it is some other equipment failure that you would never be expecting. For example with my zoom I had a strap fail. I also recently was in a car accident that claimed the life of a lens. Any damage that has happened to my gear over the years has always been something really unexpected, never when changing lenses.

Also for a landscape shooter I imagine you would get more use out of a 17-35 or 12-24 or something along those lines that offers a wider field of view. I don't know too many landscapers that shoot with a 24-70.
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:iconrockthesky:
rockTheSky Featured By Owner Feb 28, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
I've also never been in a car accident, but I did look at taking out insurance for my gear, especially since I'm also considering a D600 or a D800 for my FF body.

Also for a landscape shooter I imagine you would get more use out of a 17-35 or 12-24 or something along those lines that offers a wider field of view. I don't know too many landscapers that shoot with a 24-70.

I thought that too, but honestly, when shooting with my 18-55 I don't often feel like I need it wider than 18mm. And when I get the lens I will get an FF camera shortly afterwards so the 24mm will be a wider angle of view than the 18 on a crop anyway. I'm definitely looking forward to it.
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:iconrcooper102:
rcooper102 Featured By Owner Feb 28, 2013
Ha, i don't think anyone ever plans to be in a car accident. I have been in only one and the insurance company had to foot the bill for $6,500 in camera gear. Absolutely have insurance. I never leave home without it. :) Just remember lens repairs go back to Nikon if you want to keep your warranty which means as long as 6 weeks before it comes back. At the very least i'd suggest buying something like a 35mm F2.0 as a backup just in case the 24-70 is out of commission when a great photo opportunity comes up. :)
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:iconkimvanderveeke:
kimvanderveeke Featured By Owner Feb 16, 2013  Student Photographer
Hm. That would be my 17-70mm from Sigma because it's an all round lens. For sport I would say my 70-200 en for portraits and details my 50mm.
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:iconjelle-lightart:
Jelle-LightArt Featured By Owner Feb 14, 2013   Photographer
Tokina 11-16mm f2.8!! best wide you can get for the money.
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:iconstevecaissie-stock:
SteveCaissie-stock Featured By Owner Feb 13, 2013  Professional Photographer
Haven’t we seen this thread a billion times already? Use the lens that best works for the shot you want to achieve. End of story.
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:icondelahkel:
Delahkel Featured By Owner Feb 16, 2013  Professional Photographer
Heh, yeah, this thread does seem to popup once every few weeks :p
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:icontetchist:
Tetchist Featured By Owner Feb 14, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
oh, look. the only sane person on this website.
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:iconrcooper102:
rcooper102 Featured By Owner Feb 14, 2013
The best lens is not always clear. Choice of lens is a creative choice. So, thus, your favourite lens for a specific situation is a reflection of your creative vision. For example say I am taking a studio headshot, I could use any one of the following lenses and each is perfectly sufficient to meet my demands:

85mm F1.4
85mm F1.8
105mm F2.0
135mm F2.0
180mm F2.8
70-200mm F2.8
80-200mm F2.8
70-200mm F4

And these are just a few examples. If you add in vintage lenses that creative choice snowballs into a very complex decision, for example say I were to use an 85mm F1.5 Helios 40-2 with an adapter for my DSLR, it has characteristics that will make the image very different than using a modern 85mm F1.4.

Personally I really enjoy threads like this as it gives me into a glimpse of how other people select their lenses and why they make the choices they do.
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:icontetchist:
Tetchist Featured By Owner Feb 14, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
what the hell? I don't care. why are you replying to me with this?
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:icondelahkel:
Delahkel Featured By Owner Feb 15, 2013  Professional Photographer
So gtfo then. No one's forcing you to be here if you don't want to.
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:icontetchist:
Tetchist Featured By Owner Feb 15, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
is this like a contest to post the most unrelated reply possible?

rcooper responded with something that had nothing to do with what I said, and now you're screaming at me to leave.

why don't you guys just talk to each other, instead of dragging me into whatever conversation you desperately want to have here?
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:iconjadedphotographer:
jadedPhotographer Featured By Owner Feb 13, 2013   Photographer
50mm 1.5 sonnar for my contax II
28 1.8 for canon on a 7d
Next week the canon 50 1.4 will be my new favorite. ;)
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:iconkendra-paige:
Kendra-Paige Featured By Owner Feb 12, 2013   Photographer
Canon 85mm 1.2L.  It is the one lens I never leave at home. It just gives such a beautiful quality to everything, from studio headshots to on-location fashion, the lens is dreamy.
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:iconrcooper102:
rcooper102 Featured By Owner Feb 12, 2013
Ya.... hahaha that lens alone makes me consider switching to Canon often hahaha
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:iconkendra-paige:
Kendra-Paige Featured By Owner Feb 28, 2013   Photographer
Any time I get gear-envy over Nikon, I lovingly caress my 85 1.2. I'd have switched a while ago if it weren't for this lens.
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:iconrcooper102:
rcooper102 Featured By Owner Feb 28, 2013
Ya, I don't know why Nikon is holding back on the high end portrait primes. Esp in the 50mm range. That 50mm F1.4G isn't even really on par with the Sigma 50mm F1.4 and is miles behind the Canon 50mm F1.2. Nikon's 85mm F1.4G is an excellent lens but when compared to Canon's F1.2 is just isn't quite the same.

While Nikon is at it they desperately need a new 135mm F2.0. That old DC lens is a mind bogglingly good lens for it's time but it is far out of date now and the crappy autofocus and lack of coating gets tiring. (oh and a new 180mm F2.8, when they replace those two I probably will give up using zooms for good :) )

I guess its just the nature of the beast, it is no secret that Nikon has the edge in sensor quality right now so that is obviously where those RnD dollars are going, but Canon continues to impress me with their glass. I am really eager to see what Sigma does with this new line of theirs though, if they start releasing more lenses on par with that 35mm F1.4 we might find ourselves putting Sigma on our bodies, regardless of make.
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:icondelahkel:
Delahkel Featured By Owner Feb 15, 2013  Professional Photographer
dooooooo it :D your bank account will appreciate the diet :D
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:iconkendra-paige:
Kendra-Paige Featured By Owner Feb 28, 2013   Photographer
I've never had such brief buyer's remorse than with that lens. "I just spent $1,900 - oh man."

Then I got it, took a few photos and went: "wooorttthhh iiiitttt!"
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:icondelahkel:
Delahkel Featured By Owner Mar 1, 2013  Professional Photographer
Haha, totally know what you mean :D
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:iconrcooper102:
rcooper102 Featured By Owner Feb 15, 2013
hahahaha, It may eventually happen but for now I am still smitten with the D800. I have also been eyeing getting one of those amazing Olympus M4/3 bodies and mounting SLR Magic's 50mm F0.95 on it. Such an amazing portrait rig.
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:iconrockthesky:
rockTheSky Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
Do you own a D800 though? I had a quick peak at your gallery hoping to see some D800 shots. It's cheap enough here in the UK to make it temping for me, but I think the D600 will suffice.
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:iconrcooper102:
rcooper102 Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2013
Any shot made in the last 8 months or so in my gallery was made on a D800. The biggest difference that you will find between the D600 and the D800 is the build quality. In terms of sensor quality they are virtually the same and in most cases you won't really benefit from that extra 12mp but the D800 is a pro body with weather sealing that is simply built to take more abuse and thus it is a more reliable camera.

At the time that I bought my first D800, I didn't REALLY want it. I wanted something more like the D600 but this was 6 months before the D600 was announced. My current primary body was dead and I needed something now. I didn't have the budget to move into the D3 or D4 range so it was either a D7000, a used D700, or a D800. I borrowed a D700 to shoot with until I decided which quickly put me off the D700, which is a great camera, but for what I do 12mp is just frustrating. So it then became a decision between the D7000 and the D800. I figured I could go the D7000 route and invest the rest in some new glass but I really wanted to move into a full frame body and the D7000 was starting to lean towards the "dated technology" realm so I opted to go with the D800.

When the D600 was announced about 6 months later I was somewhat disappointed thinking that THIS is the camera I would have truly wanted. And had it been out at the time I would have likely gone the route of the D600. After shooting with the D800 I quickly fell in love with it though and when mine perished in a car accident a few months ago I had a major choice to make when deciding what to use the insurance money on: A replacement D800 or to down grade to a D600. I opted to go with the D800 again.
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:iconrockthesky:
rockTheSky Featured By Owner Feb 24, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
Wow, interesting! I keep fluttering back and fourth between the two TBH. Do you always shoot at 36mp? The file size just bothers me. I definitely wouldn't need 36, but I'm also not sure I need full weather sealing. I will be buying decent glass tho (first lens I will get is the 24-70 f2.8), and that would be a must anyway for the D800.

I know you can shoot at a lower MP count on the D800 but it sortta seems pointless to get a 36 mp cam and not shoot at 36mp for at least most of the shots you make. The D800 also appeals because the focus points cover a larger area of the viewfinder compared to the D600 where they seem quite tightly bunched together.
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:iconrcooper102:
rcooper102 Featured By Owner Feb 24, 2013
When I first got it I thought I would use the lower resolution settings, but I just find I never do. It is so nice to have the amazing quality even if you are just going to downsize it. Also I never understood the concept of just because you "have 36mp" it is a waste if you aren't always using it. I hear people saying the same thing about super expensive primes, "if you don't always shoot at F1.2, might as well not have it."

When someone buys an F350 pickup truck they don't always drive around with the box full and a trailer on the back. In fact most of the time you don't. You buy the big truck because of it's capabilities for when you need them. The same applies to photography, even if you shot 90% of the time at a lower resolution setting the camera isn't a waste, it still has best color depth of any DSLR and is a fantastic camera, you don't always have to be pushing it to the limit to make it worthwhile.

Also in my opinion the 24-70 isn't a must at all for the D800. I don't think i'd ever buy that lens, a 35 F2, 50 F1.4G, and 85 F1.8G set of primes can make as sharp or sharper images, are faster, are combined lighter, and cheaper than the monstrous 24-70. ;)
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:icondelahkel:
Delahkel Featured By Owner Feb 15, 2013  Professional Photographer
Heh, yeah, if I had a D800, I would be reluctant to give it away as well :p
Not a fan of M4/3, but an f/0.95 is awesome, I got to play with the Leica one on an M8 body, oh, the bokeh :drool: not really good for portraits though, too thin of a DoF.
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:iconfallisphoto:
FallisPhoto Featured By Owner Feb 12, 2013
That's kind of like asking whether you like screwdrivers, saws or hammers more. It depends on what you need to do the job, so no, everyone does not have a favorite lens. That's why pros pack several.
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:icondelahkel:
Delahkel Featured By Owner Feb 16, 2013  Professional Photographer
Having a pro lens doesn't mean you don't pack several though.
Sure, there are different needs for each lens, but that doesn't prevent you from enjoying to use one over the other.
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:iconfallisphoto:
FallisPhoto Featured By Owner Feb 16, 2013
Yeah, that's why I said that pros pack several -- as in professional photographers pack several lenses.
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:icondelahkel:
Delahkel Featured By Owner Feb 16, 2013  Professional Photographer
Yeah, but what I meant to say is that you can still enjoy using one lens over another, even if you won't use that lens in all situations.
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:iconfallisphoto:
FallisPhoto Featured By Owner Feb 16, 2013
Well, the 50mm lens is probably the most massively useful lens, but I wouldn't really call it a favorite because it is not optimum in so many situations. I really try not to have favorites, because it hampers good photography to pick a certain lens over another, when the other might be better in a given situation. All of them have limits.
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:icondelahkel:
Delahkel Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2013  Professional Photographer
Fair enough, but for some of us there are lenses we enjoy using more than others. Don't get me wrong, if the situation calls for it, different lenses for different jobs, but if it works for this situation, I would rather have the 24-105 for example as opposed to any other lens in this range.
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:iconfallisphoto:
FallisPhoto Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2013
I, on the other hand, much prefer prime lenses and will use them whenever possible. That is probably why I don't have favorites (no lenses that will cover a whole range of focal lengths)
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:iconmichaelrowlandson:
MichaelRowlandson Featured By Owner Feb 12, 2013  Professional Photographer
indeed,
24mm L
50mm
70-200mm 2.8L is ii


Would love to own a 600mm f4 for animal portraits but have to make do with the 2x converter.
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:iconlauraperezcerrato:
lauraperezcerrato Featured By Owner Feb 12, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
Canon 24-70mm f/2.8 L. I wish I owned one, but it's so expensive.
From what I own, Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8 (without VR). Luminous, sharp, versatile and light.
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:iconmichaelrowlandson:
MichaelRowlandson Featured By Owner Feb 12, 2013  Professional Photographer
600mm f4 L is ii *Drools*
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:iconsilentmood:
silentmood Featured By Owner Feb 12, 2013  Hobbyist
Pentax DA 15 limited. The only reason I'm still a pentaxian.
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:iconrcooper102:
rcooper102 Featured By Owner Feb 12, 2013
The one on my camera! :)

It kind of varies for me, it is really easy to love the expensive pro glass but here are a few cheaper lenses I have come across that I just adore, and in my opinion, can keep up with lenses many times their price.

Nikon 85mm F/2.8 <- This lens is so freaking amazing for the price, past for F/3.2 or so it seems to outperform (or often be indistinguishable from) the 1.4 and is lighter. It is really a great gem of a lens. One major caveat about this lens is that I find it has some serious CR issues wide open.

Tokina 100mm F2.8 Macro <- This lens is amazing. I bought it to experiment with macro and it ended up becoming one of my favourite portrait lenses. The autofocus isn't the greatest but the image quality is just fantastic and the focus clutch is so convenient. I really wish Tokina would start making more portrait range primes again.

Sigma 70-300 F/3.5-5.6 OS <- This one is a bit strange, not the best lens in my kit by a LONG shot, I mean it is a slow, relatively cheap super zoom. Normally I wouldn't even buy a lens like this. Actually I never would. But I won this little guy in a competition and have been continually floored by the images it produces. The thing sat on a shelf for like 6 months, I thought about selling it but couldn't be bothered for the $200 that it would bring in on Craigslist. Anyway, so the lens sat there gathering dust, until one day I had a need for 300mm in a pinch. I don't own any pro quality 300mm lenses as it isn't a focal length that I normally shoot so I just grabbed the Sigma figuring it probably won't perform great but it is better than nothing.

Boy was I impressed! I couldn't believe how well this cheap little zoom can do on a D800. I don't know if I happened to get the one lucky copy of the lens where everything came together perfectly but the images are all razor sharp and there isn't even a hint of CR to be found. The resolution is also fantastic. The only downside is that the lens does have a fair bit of vignette when wide open but the LR profile solves this in a single click.

I have now started using it all the time, often letting a more expensive lens in the 135-200 range sit on the shelf unused because somehow this cheap little Sigma makes better images when between F/8 and f/11. It really is a pleasant surprise and I have completely fallen in love with the lens. It isn't always useful because of how slow it is but it has quickly become a staple of my kit.
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:iconrcooper102:
rcooper102 Featured By Owner Feb 12, 2013
Typo, the 85mm is an F/1.8 not F/2.8
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