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January 31, 2013
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"blobbiness" in dark areas

:icontriarii117:
TRIARII117 Featured By Owner Jan 31, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
not really sure how else to explain it, but often times, especially in more landscape shots and not so much in macro/close ups, i get these weird areas of red and green blobs of sorts in darker areas (usually things in the foreground for a silhouette). pretty sure they are not chromatic aberrations, which the lens i use does have some problems with, but that's a different story. they usually go away by adjusting the contrast in photoshop, but i would like to know if there is any way to avoid them before having to touch them up on the computer.

i use an olympus E-PM1 with just the kit lens (at least until i get the OM adapter)

thanks in advance
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:iconmylifeinfocus:
MyLifeInFocus Featured By Owner Feb 1, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
Do you have an example to show? That'd be helpful.
I'd agree with ~Shurakai-Stock but the only other thing I could think of would be fringing from too high an ISO. Hope this helps :D
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:iconxladycinnamonx:
xLadyCinnamonx Featured By Owner Jan 31, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
Hey hey hey if you guys love photography come check out my group!!! You can join and submit your art and suggest favorites and all that great stuff :) The link is in my signature, I would really appreciate it if you checked it out :D
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:iconstevecaissie-stock:
SteveCaissie-stock Featured By Owner Jan 31, 2013  Professional Photographer
That’s a type of chromatic noise, produced by your sensor. There’s really nothing you can do about that except to learn to reduce it in post.
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:icontriarii117:
TRIARII117 Featured By Owner Jan 31, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
thanks. thats what i figured. i also noticed it appears more in the windows photo viewer than in gimp or photoshop (before editing) so im assuming it renders colours differently than those.
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:iconstevecaissie-stock:
SteveCaissie-stock Featured By Owner Feb 1, 2013  Professional Photographer
If you’re viewing RAW files, then yes, each program will render it differently, including noise reduction. Photoshop and Lightroom (which share a common RAW processing engine) have fairly aggressive noise reduction algorithms. I suspect Windows Viewer does not. My personal favourite for processing RAW files is Capture One, which has an excellent noise reduction feature as well.
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:icontriarii117:
TRIARII117 Featured By Owner Feb 1, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
well these are just in jpegs. i did a little reading too, windows photo viewer renders colors really badly, whereas GIMP and photoshop do so a lot better.

i'll look into those and see what comes out. thanks
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:iconstevecaissie-stock:
SteveCaissie-stock Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2013  Professional Photographer
Maybe try switching over to RAW, or at least RAW+JPG, and have a go at doing your own developing. You may ultimately find you like the results more.
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:iconkingstephenarthur:
KingStephenArthur Featured By Owner Jan 31, 2013  Student Photographer
I think an example would be needed to see what's goin on. at least for me, lol.
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