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January 27, 2013
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Cameras Near The Sea

:icondylan40:
Dylan40 Jan 27, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
Question had popped up into my head today about having cameras near the Gulf or the Ocean in general. I've been down near the coast several times in my life so I know there is a lot of moisture in the air. By any chance does this affect the camera in any way? Would cause any serious damage? Maybe a stupid question really don't know the answer to. If it does by any chance is there any other equipment I would need to protect it with.

Also the kind of camera I have is a FujiFilm FinePix S4250WM. Not a high dollar camera but still would like to keep it from getting damaged or anything if I was to take a trip this spring.
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:iconpokemontrainerjay:
pokemontrainerjay Feb 8, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
Take lens wipes. You can get them at Costco.
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:icondylan40:
Dylan40 Feb 8, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
Thanks but that is something I make sure I have when I have my camera. So no worries there. :)
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:iconjordan-roberts:
Jordan-Roberts Feb 5, 2013  Professional Photographer
Lived on the coast my entire life and can say that the ocean air is horrible on everything (including your house) save the fact it protects you against extreme temps! Ha

Technically every higher end camera has weather protection built into it so that doesn't matter. What does matter is the misty air when right next to the ocean. It plays havoc on your filters especially. You can take a look at my gallery, it's made up mostly of seascape photography. I've spent hundreds of hours at the ocean and haven't had a camera "ruined" by the ocean. I HAVE had plenty of gear ruined however. Remotes dropped into the water, tripod lubricant worn away and filters destroyed by salt. There's just no way of getting around it if you want ocean photos.

You can get the equipment or you don't have to. The equipment won't protect you over time, the salty air will still get stuck on everything when you take your camera out of the shell. I've never used that stuff, probably never will. If you're careful and not a spaz then you don't need it.
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:iconjordan-roberts:
Jordan-Roberts Feb 5, 2013  Professional Photographer
I forgot to mention, try not to change out your lens when right on the coast. You don't want that air inside your sensor. Again, goes back to being a spaz....... know what kind of shots you want before heading to the beach and you will only need 1 lens. I've had sand get inside... not good.
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:iconmarx-man:
MARX-MAN Feb 2, 2013  Professional Artist
For the love of everything technological, don't go near the sea unless you have weather sealing, and even then just don't do it unless it is a calm day.
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:icondylan40:
Dylan40 Feb 3, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
Keep that in mind
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:iconphotomark:
photomark Jan 29, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
I live on the cost and it can be a problem for anything ,,, salt water really does do a lot of damage to anything mechanical or electronic.

In saying that I dont have any problems with it , dont let any sea spray get on your camera at all and you will be fine .


For shooting on the beach or close to the water I have a few UV or skylight filters that I have glued plastic bags to and I simply screw on the filter and cover the camera with the bag, this way I can still shoot on the beach with all the sea spray but none of it gets to my camera or lens at any time. Any film or lens changing is done in my car or not at all , I would NEVER change over a lens while on the beach .

If you are unlucky enough to drop your camera in the salt water then it a 99% chance of an instant ruin , I have dropped a 6x6 medium format myself and while I manged to repair and clean the body the lens was a total right off.
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:iconolda-g:
Olda-G Feb 3, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
The filter with a plastic bag glued to it is a really clever idea. Thanks for the suggestion.
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:icondylan40:
Dylan40 Feb 3, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
I know it causes a lot of damage to metals and speeds the process of rusting. Usually why vehicles down near the coast have a coating of some sealant on the paint and the metal. I won't be there for a long time. It maybe a possibility of taking it down near the beach but I don't know if I want to risk it.
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:iconfallisphoto:
If it is turned on, it's ruined. If it isn't, there is a good chance you can save it. The temptation to turn it on and see if it is still working will be almost overwhelming and you are going to have to resist that. If you do turn it on, that will kill your camera. IMMEDIATELY take the battery out and dunk it in a bucket of distilled water. Let it soak until bubbles stop coming out. Pull it out, drain it, and dunk it again. Pull it out the second time, open it up, and let it sit there for a month or so until all traces of water have evaporated. When you are absolutely certain it is completely dry, inside and out, put the battery back in. Odds are pretty good that it will start working again. The trick is to get rid of all the salt.
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