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January 23, 2013
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New Perspective in your shots? How do you do?

:iconharryca:
HarryCa Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2013
That's what I saw from that Wee Han, professional photographer of perspective

"When shooting travels and landscapes, using different perspectives can still work in your photography. Getting away from eye level photography is one of the ways to capture new looks."

And you? How do you do that? :)
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:iconsecondclaw:
secondclaw Featured By Owner Jan 24, 2013
- Drop to the ground and shoot in prone position, parallel to the ground. A grass or flower-level POV is interesting at times. Beware of ants or bugs.
- Look up and shoot the sky through the trees - ultra-wide helps here, but exposure can be difficult.
- Use natural objects such as trees to frame your image.
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:iconmichaelrowlandson:
MichaelRowlandson Featured By Owner Jan 24, 2013  Professional Photographer
build a quad copter :P attach a go pro to the quadcopter or slr to a oct copter and many different views you can capture.
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:iconkingstephenarthur:
KingStephenArthur Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2013  Student Photographer
When I see something I want to photograph I'll photograph right away. After that, I make sure to shoot from many different angles, perspectives, distances, different settings, etc... aside from the very first thing I saw.
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:iconpalmbook:
palmbook Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
By giving it a lot of time and thought. I usually do my homework. I know where and when I want to be. I know what kind of photos I can hope for, even before I drive out.

When I arrive at the destination, I don't rush through taking photos and leave. I generally spend several hours to survey and plan my shots. I consult compass (to learn where the sun will appear on my photos), and sky map.

The rest is experience, I think :)

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:iconhedwards:
hedwards Featured By Owner Jan 24, 2013
I do that some times. I once waited, I think it was 2 months in order to get a shot that I wanted. Until then the weather wasn't cooperating, I needed a real torrential downpour to get the shot.

But, sometimes, you just see something, like the other day, when I saw the sun getting near to a building, and moved around a bit to get the best perspective I could. I'll probably post that later this morning.
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:iconkingstephenarthur:
KingStephenArthur Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2013  Student Photographer
That's an awesome shot, :thumbsup:
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:iconolda-g:
Olda-G Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
When shooting landscapes you are often using wide or ultra wide angle lenses where things in the foreground tend to be dominant subjects with the background receding rapidly into the distance. The wider the lens, the bigger difference in between a couple of feet closer to your foreground subject. Shooting at waist height or knee height will make a big difference compared to eye level. Unfortunately, I'm not as young as I once was and those shots are getting more difficult.
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:iconhedwards:
hedwards Featured By Owner Jan 24, 2013
I've taken to holding my P&S like an oldschool view camera. At about waist level looking down at the articulated LCD screen. It's actually not just a good way to stabilize the camera, but it helps a lot with getting a slightly different angle on things.
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:iconolda-g:
Olda-G Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
That's actually a pretty good approach. I'm thinking about adding a P&S to my arsenal a simple carry along and an articulated screen would certainly help with getting low angle shots.
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:iconhedwards:
hedwards Featured By Owner Jan 26, 2013
I wasn't able bring my tripod with me to China, so I had to learn to stabilize as best I could.

It's also nice for times when I want to get a quick snapshot of myself.

The one thing the 60D has that the 7D doesn't, which I would have liked, is the articulated screen. I know I can get an angle-finder, but it's really not the same and it's pretty much only useful for when the camera is really low.
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:icongeorgewjohnson:
georgewjohnson Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
One of the great things I have learned through photography is to stop looking and actually see things. I'll suddenly notice something out of the corner of my eye and tell someone with me and they wonder how I see these things. It's only taken a few years to develop an eye and mind that is always actively looking or something interesting. I am no an expert by any means but it's such a thrill to be able to spot things you never could before and you know it's down to your hard work and practice.

You spot a scene and you immediately start to move around it and "work the shot", looking from something that's interesting. I always remember are the words of photographer Scott Kelby from one of his books, "You go to a tourist site for example, do you really want to come home with a photo that you could just buy on a $1 postcard? Move around the site, take stupid angle shots, try odd compositions, anything but just look for something different that no one else has tried. It's not going to be easy but that's not why you decided to this right? Surely the challenge is in coming home with a one-in-a-million shot that no else has. So work hard for it and get the reward."
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