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December 28, 2012
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trouble shooting

:icondiosrubra:
diosrubra Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2012
hi everyone, Im quite new really at photography and i know a few people will hate this question as its too generic but i always seem to hit every snag going when taking photos from too much glare off of glass, blurred images when i take flash off and things being backlit and turning out too dark etc. just wandering what problems you have and how you've got around them?
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:icontimberclipse:
TimberClipse Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2012  Professional Filmographer
Glass is more important that the body that it is on.
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:icondiosrubra:
diosrubra Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2012
eh?
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:iconfallisphoto:
FallisPhoto Featured By Owner Dec 29, 2012
Oh, and BTW, that statement has never really been true except in very general terms. When you need a 4x5 view camera, a subminiature 110 camera isn't going to work, no matter what lens you put on it.
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:iconfallisphoto:
FallisPhoto Featured By Owner Dec 29, 2012

"Glass is more important that the body that it is on."

 

Translation and explaination: The lens is the most important item of gear in photography. It is more important than the camera you attach it to. This was fairly true in the film age, when a camera was pretty much just a light-tight box with a hole in it that you attached a shutter to and the image capture device was a piece of film, but these days the image capture device is usually a digital sensor. Back then, the quality of the lens was pretty much the only seriously considered technical factor that limited how well your photos could come out. With digital cameras, the sensor, which is part of the camera body, is also very important. The lens is still very important, but this statement is less true today than it used to be, because the lens is no longer the only quality-limiting factor related to gear. An Ansco 1.2mp camera with a Noctilux lens on it is going to shoot photos that look like crap even with the very expensive lens. The statement is thus only true for digital cameras if it is assumed that the body meets a minimum standard.

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:icondiosrubra:
diosrubra Featured By Owner Dec 31, 2012
ty for the explanation been ill the past few days so comments like that have gone over my head lately
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:iconfallisphoto:
FallisPhoto Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2012
Expertise comes from experience. Experience is making every imaginable mistake and learning from them. As time goes on you make fewer mistakes.
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:icondiosrubra:
diosrubra Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2012
nicely put but how do we learn from our mistakes if we dont ask for help
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:iconfallisphoto:
FallisPhoto Featured By Owner Dec 29, 2012
Well, you CAN learn through a process called trial and error. That's how most of us learn the vast majority of what we know.

Now about asking for help: I haven't checked the thread today, but last time I did check, you had not asked for help with anything specific and had not mentioned a specific problem. The topic of photography covers a whole lot of territory and I don't care to write a dozen textbooks here, so what specific areas do you feel that you need help in? Can you narrow it down any at all? Lighting? Composition? Exposure? Post processing? Making prints? Advanced darkroom techniques? Film/developer selection? Presentation? Marketing?

Seriously, back before there were digital cameras and things got complicated, when a camera had an ASA/ISO setting, a shutter speed setting, a focus control and an f/stop setting, there were textbooks two inches thick on how to use them. Things have gotten a whole lot more complicated now.
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:iconstevecaissie-stock:
SteveCaissie-stock Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2012  Professional Photographer
Window glare: turn off all room lights if you want to shoot from inside looking outside. Use a circular polarizer to limit reflections. Never fire a flash directly at a window, mirror or similarly reflective surface; it’ll bounce directly back into the camera.

Backlight: use the flash on your camera, preferably in manual mode. If that’s too harsh, use a silver reflector to bounce some of that light back into your subject. If that’s still too harsh, switch to a white reflector. Remember that the larger the light source, the softer the shadows it’s going to produce, and that applies to reflectors, too. If you don’t want hard, specular highlights on people’s skin, use a bedsheet as a reflector if you can.

Low light: tripod, or brace the camera on a solid surface. Crank your ISO and learn to either live with the high ISO noise or get some sort of noise reduction program or plug-in.

My problem is that I can’t afford the $28,000 I need to buy the camera I want.
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:icondiosrubra:
diosrubra Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2012
tyvm for the tips il be sure to use them unfortunately money is a problem for me too and i think a problem for many artists :)
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:iconstevecaissie-stock:
SteveCaissie-stock Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2012  Professional Photographer
Money will always be a problem, but there are ways around that. A piece of white foam core makes an excellent reflector and costs next to nothing (I used one on a fashion shoot once). A white sheet or sheer white drapes over a window make a perfectly useable softbox. I don’t have the money for the 40-megapixel camera I want, but I can save my pennies and wait for a used 30-MP to come up on eBay. It’s not the gear that makes the photographer, it’s what you do with it.
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:icondiosrubra:
diosrubra Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2012
very true about what you do with it i know someone who gets amazing shots off their mobile;) think they'll probably complain at my place of work where i do most of my photography if i start draping things around though but the tips you gave me helped, good luck in finding your camera
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:icongeorgewjohnson:
georgewjohnson Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Looks like your taking the right steps, managing to identify that you have some issues and then looking for solutions.

Glare. Shooting contre-jour, ie direct into the sun? Try to avoid shooting at certain angles to the direct light source, use a lens hood or or a baseball cap ( should always have one with you when shooting! ), a hand or something to shield the front of the lens from the direct sunlight. Oh and make sure you clean your lens front element, greasy finger cack on the lens front element is will show up as cack on the image or flare spots if it's bad enough.

Blurred images in low-light and backlit issues, in a word ( or two!) "exposure triangle". The knobs and dials or buttons and touch screen options on your camera work as a team. ISO, shutter-speed and lens aperture. What one giveth with one, one must taketh away with another, amen. :laughing:

Severe dark and light issues in a scene, look up the technique known as "fill flash photography", contrary to what people might think you use your flash on a bright sunny day to attempt to bring the subject up to the same level of brightness as the bright background behind them. If it's a scene with bright sky/dark ground, look up buying and using ND grad filters to balance the the light levels the camera is measuring.

Other stuff I found out the hard way, using the exposure triangle in real world situations to get real results, not just reading the dry guff on it and in one ear and out the other! Cable releases and mirror-lockup, using ND filters correctly, lens focal lengths and perspective-compression, hyperfocal distance calculations, that's just the most obvious stuff off the top of my head that's made a huge difference to me and what I like to shoot. As I said to someone a week or two back, I thought I could lick this photographic lark in 5 minutes flat, well that was 3 or 4 years ago and only now am I starting to see the sort of results I wanted to see back then, so the last thing on the list is lots and lots and lots and lots of practice!
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:icondiosrubra:
diosrubra Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2012
i remember reading that ;)ty for the tips i shall continue to play as i always do
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:icontetchist:
Tetchist Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
the problems you've encountered are called "the laws of physics"

welcome to photography.
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:icondiosrubra:
diosrubra Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2012
lol tyvm
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:iconwiingzz:
wiingzz Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
taking sharp shots in low light..
tip: Always use a tripod in low light!
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:icondiosrubra:
diosrubra Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2012
tyvm for the tip just need to buy a tripod now lol
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