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December 9, 2012
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Ho much time do you spend on Photoshop?

:icons2photos:
S2Photos Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
As the title says. I'm wondering how much time the pro photographers, of any or all styles, spend in the editing phase. I have always fine tuned and corrected, but with a new camera coming soon and a new city, I'm wondering if I can revamp my style with planning more shits with editing in mind. I always like to compare with people that are better than I, so DO TELL!
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Devious Comments

:icon1sidedownand2up:
1sidedownand2up Featured By Owner Dec 20, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I've used photoshop a lot for when I can be bothered to get the images off my P&S, seeing as it gets nowhere near enough use. Having used one of my collage's somewhat old (I think it counts as old now )nikon D-40 made me see how so-so my curent camera is.

Overal I've just not had time to photograph anything recently.
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:iconcailenc:
cailenc Featured By Owner Dec 19, 2012
When I began years ago I used PS a little bit too much. Think about 60 Minutes per Picture, filter over filter and everything that had to be done to make it at least a little bit beautiful. These days I try to use it as less as possible, and it works really good. since my equipment grew and my skills got better, I don't have to change so much. Think for my latest pictures I used Photoshop only about a Minute to add my pre-made frame and a little bit selective colorcorrection. That's all I use it for since a few months...well, if it's a portrait for sure a little bit more, my models expect clean skin, but even then I try to keep it as close to reality as I can :)
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:iconmkr:
mkr Featured By Owner Dec 19, 2012  Professional General Artist
None. I rarely spend more than 30 minutes touching a photo up in GIMP.
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:icons2photos:
S2Photos Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Why has nobody corrected me about my typo in the title?!?! This is almost 2 weeks old and I just noticed :ashamed:
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:iconhemphat:
HempHat Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
There are better things to worry about. ;)

But to answer the question, I do not personally edit at all. For me it is a matter of patience, practice and taking the time to try to produce a great photograph.
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:icons2photos:
S2Photos Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Yeah I have patience issues. So I'll just snap 20 shots of the same subject and then figure out which I like later haha.
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:iconhemphat:
HempHat Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Good luck if you decide to take up animal photography, you'll need a lot of patience. :giggle:
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:icons2photos:
S2Photos Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
lol i'll get right on that
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:icondragonfly-oli:
dragonfly-oli Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
First of all, I use Gimp, but when I use it, I spend about.. half an hour to 2 hours for one picture.
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:icons2photos:
S2Photos Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Another one I'm not familiar with. I've been out of the game for a while, so one more thing to google. And you have beautiful work, so it looks like it gets the editing job done. :D
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:icondragonfly-oli:
dragonfly-oli Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you. :aww:
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:iconkippa2001:
kippa2001 Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2012
Most of my time I am just doing subtle alterations like saturation and contrast changes. Every once in a while I fart about with layers but not that often. I'd say I'd spend about 5 mins a photograph, and about 20 mins for doing 1 hdr photograph (I keep tweaking the settings till I am happy).
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:iconchristophmaier:
ChristophMaier Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Really depends, for larger shoots (events, weddings, parties etc) I sort through most photos with Lightroom, which takes not longer than maybe 2-3 minutes. After that I take a closer look at the 'special shots' Those get the Photoshop treatment and will take something less than 30 minutes. But that's usually only a small percentage of the images taken.
Then there are those really special shots. Those can easily take up several hours of work, sometimes over multiple sessions.
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:icons2photos:
S2Photos Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
I'm not familiar with Lightroom, but I'm going to go google it now. I'm about to start moving into event photography, so it's good notes for me to prioritize my shots in post. Thanks :D
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:iconchristophmaier:
ChristophMaier Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Lightroom is really great to quickly develop a lot of images, plus it has a lot of very powerfull tools for editing RAW images. You should really give it a close look.
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:iconimoink:
IMOInk Featured By Owner Dec 16, 2012  Professional Photographer
In general, I spend about 2-5 minutes on an image. It depends on what needs to be fixed and how artistic I'm getting with the edits. Generally, though...no longer than 5 minutes.
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:icondeliquesce-flux:
Deliquesce-Flux Featured By Owner Dec 16, 2012  Professional Photographer
Depends on what I'm doing.

Covering an event in beautiful sunny California conditions- I don't edit whatsoever, except run the photo through Photoshop's image processor to watermark them for sale.

Shooting portraiture or fashion photography- Anywhere from an hour to a week depending on what I want. Sometimes I enjoy the photographs to look natural, and I will only make minor aesthetic adjustments such as removing a blemish here and there. Other times, I want something different, fantastical, and with that, I will take out my tablet and literally paint unto the photograph, and that can take many hours.

:)
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:iconk13r:
k13r Featured By Owner Dec 16, 2012
I've put myself on a photoshop semi-ban. I now only use it for seconds at a time to convert RAW to JPG (etc) and sometimes a little cropping. I've found myself thinking a lot more about what I am actually doing at the time I take the shot - whilst I understand photoshop has it's place I find it leads to getting lazy.
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:iconsarah-bk:
Sarah-BK Featured By Owner Dec 14, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
I started off just tweaking contrast and saturation on much simple (and crappier) photo editing software (and also when my cameras weren't that great) which barely takes a minute, but as you discover more features to improve your photos, and depending on what you finally want to achieve - then you will know how much time one is to spend. Spending a lot of time editing a photo does not always directly correlate with how good the end product will be. Some awesome photos are barely touched with photo editing software, while others require hours upon hours. You always need a good photo to start with.

I'd say from start to finish a normal and rather basic photo processing usually takes me between 15-30 minutes, but I often start and stop editing, just to unsettle my eyes and see what needs to be arranged again when I look at it again.
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:iconraining-insanity:
Raining-Insanity Featured By Owner Dec 14, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Well usually I just tweak contrast, remove noise or add sharpness, so that's about.... 2 minutes or less.
If I go into colour-manipulating and/or experimenting, then 15 minutes.
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:iconhouseofflies:
HouseOfFlies Featured By Owner Dec 14, 2012  Student Filmographer
I'm not terribly good with photoshop so hardly any. If I can avoid it, I do. Though I do plan on learning it quite well because I know that will help me with things in the long run and not only with photography.
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:iconjade-iris:
jade-iris Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012  Professional Photographer
It really depends on what images I'm working on. Most of the time I'll spend maybe 2-5mins per image, which is just colour corrections or little touch-ups. Sometimes I have to spend more time depending on what the client wants (ie. composites, certain effects etc..) and those can take anywhere from 15 mins to an hour. I've never really "timed" myself, so it could be longer or shorter... I have a habit of ignoring the time when I get very involved in a project, lol
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:icons2photos:
S2Photos Featured By Owner Dec 12, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
lol yup. I try not to focus on it, just do it till the job is done. Especially when music is going on in the background.
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:icongeorgewjohnson:
georgewjohnson Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Depends what's needed. Shortest is usually about 5 minutes, longest can be several weeks or months just dipping in with 20 minutes every so often. The average on any given image will usually be about 90 minutes to 2 hours, all depends what's needed and what I am looking for. I find BW images take the longest as you have to really study the tones and get the contrast right in order to make the impact you're looking for.

I like to get the edits done in one sitting but I have work-in-progress images that have been w-i-p for maybe 2 years. I go back as my skills improve and see if I can make them better.
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:icons2photos:
S2Photos Featured By Owner Dec 12, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Thats a good idea! Usually when I'm done with something, it goes into the file and I never look at it again. I think that it's mostly from lack of skills and when I'm done I'm physically exhausted from all the experimenting and Control+Z
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:iconblack-allison:
Black-Allison Featured By Owner Dec 10, 2012
Once a week? I don't really use it a lot in my works at all. Not much of a photographer or an experimental one at that.

Think the longest I've spent on it was probably this piece [link] which took like 3-5 hours to piece together from like, 10 photographs or something, and make a cohesive unified image. But most of the brute work was done irl.
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:icons2photos:
S2Photos Featured By Owner Dec 12, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Nice concept on that one :D Yeah I've only done a few pieces of multiple photos layered, and it is a brute no matter how you do most of the work.
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:iconfallisphoto:
FallisPhoto Featured By Owner Dec 10, 2012
The longest amount of time I have ever spent post editing a photo was four months (2 to 4 hours per day). This was with a severely screwed up old photo that was in need of repair and I had to do it in MS Paint though, one pixel at a time, not in Photoshop. It was a photo I had found of my great grandmother and it had been folded twice, cracking the emulsion severely.
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:icons2photos:
S2Photos Featured By Owner Dec 10, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Wow. I can't imagine the attention to detail involved.
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:iconfallisphoto:
FallisPhoto Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012
I've talked to one other guy who did that and we both agree that the biggest problem with doing something like that is that you never want to look at the photo again. My father likes it though.
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:icons2photos:
S2Photos Featured By Owner Dec 12, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Yeah that makes sense. It's good to have a project with such sentimental reasoning behind it.
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:iconfallisphoto:
FallisPhoto Featured By Owner Dec 12, 2012
... and maybe in a year or two I can stand to look at that photo again.
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:iconnicofroehberg:
NicoFroehberg Featured By Owner Dec 10, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
hm itīs not new, like the most it reaches from some minutes to some hours, but so much time i only spend on it, if i have an attack of creativity, because photography is my biggest hobby but still a hobby and i donīt have soo much time... ;)
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:icondelahkel:
Delahkel Featured By Owner Dec 10, 2012  Professional Photographer
Shortest I've finished editing a photo was 5 minutes, longest was 4-5 hours, not exactly sure, but a lot of it was trial and error, if I'd have to do it again, I'd probably be able to do it in less than 3.
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:iconstevecaissie-stock:
SteveCaissie-stock Featured By Owner Dec 10, 2012  Professional Photographer
Three weeks was my record, but that was a highly involved composite shot. I even detailed the process here on my old account.

But in general, I’ll spend a few minutes cleaning lint and dust off of pics for personal or business portraits, maybe fix a stray hair or two. For editorial or advertising beauty work, I might spend up to 8 hours on skin smoothing (I do it by hand, rather than relying on plug-ins, because I find there isn’t a single skin-smoothing plug-in that doesn’t make faces look plastic). Cars can get pretty involved as well, what with all the paths to isolate different parts, and all the airbrushing out reflections. I did one recently that took about ten hours. My rule of thumb is “it takes as long as it takes”.
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:icondelahkel:
Delahkel Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2012  Professional Photographer
Hmm, do you mind sharing your skin smoothing technique?
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:iconstevecaissie-stock:
SteveCaissie-stock Featured By Owner Dec 20, 2012  Professional Photographer
I didn’t invent the technique (in fact, if you search for it on deviantart, you’ll likely find a few tutorials), but I tweaked it a bit. The basic idea is to modulate relative highlights and shadows in adjacent areas of tone. You can do this a few different ways, but I personally find the best way to do it is to process out your RAW files with three different exposures, one stop apart (hence, a -1EV version, a 0EV and a +1EV). Layer the -1 and +1 exposures over the base exposure in Photoshop, with layer masks filled with black. Then use the airbrush tool with a moderately small radius (anywhere from 1 pixel up to about 9 or so, depending on the size of the feature you need to blend in) and paint with white on the layer masks: paint on the +1EV layer mask to lighten any areas that are too dark relative to their surrounding pixels, and on the -1EV layer mask to darken any areas that are too bright. Keep the opacity relatively low (anywhere from 1% to 10% at most) and slowly build up the adjustments until they’re blended cleanly.

That’s the basic principle. In action, I tend to use a few additional tricks and techniques. For instance, I use a Wacom with the opacity keyed to pressure sensitivity for extra-fine control. I also use a number of “check layers“ – usually adjustment layers to do things like desaturate the image (it makes it easier to see subtle differences in relative luminosity when you’re not distracted by the colour information), curves or brightness/contrast to darken the image down or push the overall contrast temporarily (again, makes it easier to see minor contrast differences), and often some combination of colour and saturation layers to fix issues that might creep in while you’re doing your ersatz dodging and burning (when you lighten a very dark spot on someone’s skin, for instance, you may find that the hue no longer matches, so you’ve got to fix that as well).

My final trick (and this is one that I’ve never seen anyone else talk about, but it’s the reason my work looks better than any plug-in or program) is to create three separate windows for the image that you’re working on and arrange them so that you are viewing the image at three different magnifications. I realized pretty early on that when you’re zoomed in to 600% doing single-pixel-level adjustments to some areas, you tend to miss the larger blotchy patches. Sort of missing the forest for the trees. Working simultaneously at three magnifications allows you to adjust the size and opacity of your brush so that you smooth out not just the pore-level imperfections but larger areas of skin blotchiness, badly-placed shadows (no matter how carefully you light someone, some part of their anatomy will invariably cast an awkward shadow somewhere) and even use it to re-shape features.

If it would help, I can toss a couple of screen-grabs of one of my projects in my scraps so you can see what I’m talking about.
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:icondelahkel:
Delahkel Featured By Owner Dec 20, 2012  Professional Photographer
Ok, I think I got it, thanks.
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:icons2photos:
S2Photos Featured By Owner Dec 10, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
That's right up the alley I was thinking of editing. Adjusting colors is one thing, but going at it proactively with a list of things to do seems like it would take forever, obviously depending on the photo.
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:iconmchectr:
mchectr Featured By Owner Dec 10, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
5 hours is my longest, but what am I compared to all the other exprotogaphers?.... haha, mixed word. Expert, Professional, Photographer.... You get the idea.... :B
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:icons2photos:
S2Photos Featured By Owner Dec 10, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Im stealing that term
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:iconmchectr:
mchectr Featured By Owner Dec 10, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Oh good, it's nice to have another word.
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:iconmchectr:
mchectr Featured By Owner Dec 10, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Ohhh crap, now my slow internet connection has recreated a second reply, terribly sorry for that.
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:iconmchectr:
mchectr Featured By Owner Dec 10, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
5 hours is my longest, but what am I compared to all the other exprotogaphers?.... haha, mixed word. Expert, Professional, Photographer.... You get the idea.... :B
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:iconforevercty:
foreverCTY Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Hmm... my shortest edit which was just basic adjustment layers took about five minutes. Then again, shoots where I'm pushing themes and colours, or cosplay (I refer specifically to one that involved a firebending subject) have taken me up to 10 hours. (without saving until just about 5 minutes before the power went out. They're honest about that save often or die thing.)
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:icons2photos:
S2Photos Featured By Owner Dec 10, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
lol yeah ive been burned by the lack of saving too.
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:iconforevercty:
foreverCTY Featured By Owner Dec 10, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Indeed. And then thankfully Adobe introduced auto-saving.
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:iconrcooper102:
rcooper102 Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2012
Anywhere from 15min to 30 hours depending on what I am doing
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:icons2photos:
S2Photos Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
30 hours just blows my mind, but I'm sure with all the layers that are possible, tagged with that drive for perfectionism, it can become somewhat regular.
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:iconself-epidemic:
Self-Epidemic Featured By Owner Dec 10, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
Its possible, neccessary I could argue. 30 hours on a photograph does issue the warning of wherever they're actually using their time sensibly, or just wasting it.
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