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December 7, 2012
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Worst of the worst:

:iconfallisphoto:
FallisPhoto Featured By Owner Dec 7, 2012
What is the most god-awful P.O.S. camera you ever owned?

Probably the worst I ever owned was a Holga. After the back came off for the third consecutive time, on one outing, I stomped it to death out of sheer frustration. After that, I started using vintage box cameras when I wanted to take those kinds of photos.
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:iconhassanalkhajul:
HassanAlKhajul Featured By Owner Dec 30, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
I don't remember the name or manufacturer but back when a 6-megapixel DSLR would have cost you a few months rent, my dad bought me some super cheapo digital point-and-shoot that was in plastic clamshell packaging. To further paint the picture for you, the packaging had stock images of a guy skateboarding, some girl jumping in the air, stuff like that. Real promising.

It could hold a whopping 5 pictures at its regular resolution, which was something like 320x240, or 30 pictures at its smaller resolution, which might as well be the size of our dA icons. It had a button to take the picture, two other buttons for erasing pictures and toggling the pathetic resolution, and a little 7-segment display to show how many more pictures you can take. And the pictures were mostly awful.

Boy, some of you young whipper-snappers think you had it bad with your 5MP point-and-shoot cameras from the major names like Nikon, Minolta, Olympus, etc...
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:iconfallisphoto:
FallisPhoto Featured By Owner Dec 30, 2012
Personally speaking, my "young whipper snapper" days are more than 30 years behind me. I hadn't even heard of a digital camera until I had been shooting film for nearly 10 years, and the ones that were available then were jokes. When I looked at the first digital photo I ever saw, it was so bad I couldn't tell what it was. It just looked like a random pattern of squares. The one you had sounds like it might have been an Argus. They used to sell them in department stores out of bins. As I recall, they were 1mp cameras and they cost about $15 or $20. Even Fisher Price makes better cameras than that now.
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:iconxcetera:
Xcetera Featured By Owner Dec 26, 2012  Professional Photographer
I've been fairly lucky. My worst camera was my second and last POS, a Sony Cybershot. It didn't matter if the ISO was at the lowest possible value, the photos came out with terribly noisy and had colour distortion. Hated that thing. My first point and shoot was an Olympus, and I loved it. It was a wonderful camera and miles better than the Sony.

'Course, I can never go back now that I have my Mark, Rebel, and Konika :)
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:iconfallisphoto:
FallisPhoto Featured By Owner Dec 26, 2012
Oh, you can never tell when you are going to get a POS foisted upon you. You won't know until you take it out of the box and shoot with it for a while.

The only Olympus cameras I have tried were the early OM series SLRs and their 35-series rangefinders. Those are very good, but I was warned off from the rest by camera repairmen.
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:iconjackmolotov3:
JackMolotov3 Featured By Owner Dec 25, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
my first 35mm camera, when I was 7.(this is LONG before consumer digital cameras).

It was a crappy fixed focal length/fixed aperture kodak 35mm @f5.6, manual wind.

Something like this, it could be it, but I can't remember.
[link]

My parents bought one for me for a birthday, and I took a zillion photos. I can't say it was "gawd awful", it never came apart on me.

At the tender age of 7, I thought the pictures where good, well as good as you get shooting without aperture, exposure, or focus controls.
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:iconfallisphoto:
FallisPhoto Featured By Owner Dec 26, 2012
That looks like one of those cameras that CVS pharmacy used to sell from time to time, with the selling point of "free film for life." It was only one step up from a disposable camera and they would only reload that particular camera, but if you could make it last more than a couple of weeks, they'd keep reloading it. Oh, and doing things like changing the battery or loading/unloading it yourself voided the contract.
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:iconjackmolotov3:
JackMolotov3 Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
except there was no free film for life. but other than that, yeah.

At the tender age of 7, it was awesome to have a camera period.
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:iconrustyironmonger:
rustyironmonger Featured By Owner Dec 24, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
A POS Olympus 5mp point & shoot digital that I have two photos from 2006 taken on it up on dA, and am trying to locate the memory cards with sets taken at an architectural salvage yard and two run-down towing yards full of mostly 1940s-70s American cars between 2004 and 2007, a Konica 35mm point & shoot film camera inherited from my grandfather that some pics were taken on between 2002 and 2007, and my first modern digital that was some kind of Kodak EasyShare first released in 2008. All were pieces of junk that didn't work well, images required extensive editing and correction and even then quality & resolution sucked. No comment on the Albertsons store-brand disposable that I took photos at the Oregon Coast Aquarium with and that the photos from were lost (but will probably turn up in my in-progress move across town and end up digitized/edited/posted to dA if anywhere near decent)

I have an early 70s cheapie Japanese brand cartridge film camera here that was never used, if film was still available and there was more than one lab in the area that still handled cartridge film, I would say that my 1935 Kodak Brownie Junior and 1948 Ansco auto-flash cameras, again never-used vintage items, would have better quality but would be developed by the same (very reputable) lab.
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:iconfallisphoto:
FallisPhoto Featured By Owner Dec 24, 2012
I never tried an Olympus digital p&s camera. My digital point and shoots have all been Nikon and Canon. The Nikons were not very good, but they were not the best. I did at least a little research though, before buying my first one, and never did consider buying an Olympus. Konica made some pretty good 35mm cameras (mostly rangefinders, back in the early 70s, like the Auto S series), but none of them were p&s cameras. Kodak made the Medallists and the Retina series and they have not made a good camera since then (the fifties).

Cartridge film is available in 110 once again: [link] 126 flm is the same size as 35mm film and, if you can buy a couple of old expired film cardridges, you can reload them: [link] Your old film cartridge caemras are still usable.

The Ansco cameras usually have pretty good German lenses (it's the rest of the camera that sucks), so you'd probably get pretty decent photos out of it for as long as it worked (probably not long). the Kodak Brownie Junior uses 620 film, which is available online, or you can roll your own (620 is the same size as 120, but the spindle is different). Both of those cameras can be used.
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:iconrustyironmonger:
rustyironmonger Featured By Owner Dec 24, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks! I love my Nikon L22 (which survived being dropped numerous times) and L120 even tho they aren't great, I may be receiving either a Nikon P510 bridge camera or Nikon D60 DSLR for Christmas, and I will eventually start using a less pristine but workable Brownie Junior, which I have the manual for in PDF form... that Brownie and the Ansco are to become decorations in my new place...
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