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November 14, 2012
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Ansel - Why do you love or loath him?

:icongeorgewjohnson:
georgewjohnson Featured By Owner Nov 14, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
There is a major exhibition of Ansel Adams work at the Maritime Museum in London until April 2013.

[link]

Now I have to be up front and say I don't find Ansel Adams images that interesting ( I can hear the cries of heresy as I write! ), maybe I've only seen small prints in books and magazines and that's not enough. I suppose I also have an instant dislike to anything where people appear to simply fawn over something just because everyone seems to be doing the same. I have nothing but respect for the man and his technical achievements, you can't fault him and he was one of the earliest eco-warriors, fighting to get the wonderful wild spaces he loved so much, put under government protection.

So over to you, what is it about Adams' wok that you love or loath? Should I put my possibly misguided misconceptions to one side and attend the exhibition?
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:icontetchist:
Tetchist Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
I can't really say that I have a favorite photo of his or anything, but his work is technically excellent and he's an important figure in the history of photography and darkroom techniques, so saying I "loathe" him would be pretty silly.

I do really like the work of Clyde Butcher, who is sort of like a younger ansel adams - by 40 years.
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:iconjonniedee:
jonniedee Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
You have to keep in mind that he started working in the early 20th century. This is not digital photography where you can just snap away, look at your photos instantly, and delete the ones you do not want. This guy had a lot of skill and it took a long time and practice to gain that. Today, we don't really see the type of patience and professional technique. We have it so much easier, that there is no way to compare. Can you imagine traveling during the 1920's, 30's, 40's etc? Life was a lot slower and harder back then. I think the generation gap between us and his early life is too far apart to really understand.
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:icondelahkel:
Delahkel Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012  Student Photographer
I don't think anyone is disputing the fact that almost everything was harder back then, and that he was a pioneer in photography, but you can't expect people to like his work just because it was harder for him to produce them than it is for the typical landscape photographer today. If I had a choice, I'd hang on my wall the work that is more pleasing to my eyes, not the one that was harder to make.
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:iconfallisphoto:
FallisPhoto Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012
I wish I could hand some of these guys a 1920s camera and a roll of film and say, "okay, show me how easy it is." Almost all of them would be utterly lost and I bet I wouldn't see more than one or two properly exposed photos on the roll.
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:iconjonniedee:
jonniedee Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
:thumbsup:
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:icondelahkel:
Delahkel Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012  Student Photographer
Sure, and hand a photographer from 100 years ago a Phase One, and he wouldn't be able to get great results right away, that is, if they don't step away from it, calling it black magic.
It's all about getting used to the technology at hand. We measure exposure differently than how they did 100 years ago.
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:iconfallisphoto:
FallisPhoto Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012
Actually, he probably could, given about an hour to figure it out. He'd be amazed at the assists though.
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:icondelahkel:
Delahkel Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012  Student Photographer
Depends on the person I guess. Still, film isn't that much harder to get used to, just slower, and probably heavier, considering the need for tripod when used with medium and large format.
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:iconfallisphoto:
FallisPhoto Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012
Medium format cameras don't have to be used with tripods any more than 35mm cameras do. It's just smarter to use one than not to if you can (that applies to 35mm and digital cameras too) and the guys who shoot in medium format usually have more invested in getting good photos. Large format cameras usually require a tripod, but even then there are what are called press cameras that can be used without one. It is nearly always advisable to use a tripod if the situation allows for it, buit is even more so when it costs $10 per photo.
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:iconkingstephenarthur:
KingStephenArthur Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Student Photographer
people obsess over historical figures as if they have magical powers or something. it's like that with everything, I'm not describing it the way I would like, but maybe you get the point.

I also do not find his all that interesting to be honest. he has some nice shots here and there.

really what he should be known for is being a pioneer of sorts, for that I admire him. Bringing popularity and respect to photography.
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