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January 28, 2013
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How far we've come!

:iconhavetales-willtell:
HaveTales-WillTell Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2013  Professional Writer
In response to *glossolalias's recent thread, "What can't you write?" it occurred to me pose the flip side of his question. Since joining :dalogo:, what perceived weaknesses or gaps in your writing have you managed to overcome?

:bulletgreen: Is it formatting? Or even just finishing something? Are sonnets less intimidating now? Have you written a villanelle, sestina, or even a ghazal?

:bulletgreen: Is writing prose no longer such a bugaboo? Have you tackled characterization? Nonfiction? Did you finally compose something longer than 2,000 words? 5,000? 50,000?

:bulletgreen: Can you edit your own work with more confidence? How about critiquing others? Has your vocabulary expanded? How far along the writer's learning curve do you feel you've climbed?

For myself, seven years ago I lacked confidence in my free verse (too unstructured) and microfiction (too constricting). Now I consider those areas to be among my strengths.

:ahoy: Your turn. Boast away.
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:iconneopaladinoflight:
NeoPaladinOfLight Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
I don't know where I stand from a literature standpoint. I write mainly just so I can remember some ideas I came up with. Something of a "do it for me" kinda thing. Then when I go back and read over these ideas, I the problems with it technically speaking and strive to make it better.

One thing I've noticed with myself as I've grown is that before I used to really like focusing on the technical plot point. I liked more of what was happening as opposed to who it was happening to, but now those things are reversed. This is sort of in line with the TV shows and comic books I read now, too. I need to see why and how the characters react in the way they do instead of what they're reacting to. I guess that's a good thing.
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:iconhavetales-willtell:
HaveTales-WillTell Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2013  Professional Writer
:thumbsup: Your change of focus means that you're growing as a writer. It's something to be proud of; and even more so, something to be encouraged.
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:icondamaimikaz:
DamaiMikaz Featured By Owner Jan 31, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I never posted so much of my work on DA (language barrier... not good with translating... etc).
I did, however, learn quite a lot from just hanging around at DA's forums. Not about writing itself, but about how many more writers struggle with the same problems as I do. And that I'm not that bad at thinking up story's as I thought I was. I guess I grew some confidence over the years :)
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:iconhavetales-willtell:
HaveTales-WillTell Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2013  Professional Writer
With age comes experience, and with experience comes confidence. This is true whether you're eighteen or eighty. :XD:
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:icondamaimikaz:
DamaiMikaz Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Well... let's hope it'll be even better in 10 years :)
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:iconhavetales-willtell:
HaveTales-WillTell Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2013  Professional Writer
If you continue to work at it, it will. Have you heard of Malcolm Gladwell, and his book Outliers? His premise is that putting 10,000 hours of practice into any skill is enough to be able to call yourself a master, in part because nobody would stick with anything for that long without seeing some sort of incremental progress along the way.
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:icondamaimikaz:
DamaiMikaz Featured By Owner Feb 3, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yeah. I've heard about that theory.
I've been writing ever since I was 6 years old (Yeah... weird childhood obsessions) almost every single day. And the days that I didn't have time to write, I thought up new storylines in my head. It has become sort of an idle process for my mind. Something that it does automatically when I don't have to focus on something else. I guess with that, I've made it already way over that 10.000 hours limit, a few years ago. I kinda noticed my writing style stabilizing back then.
It's not that I haven't improved after that. I'm still thinking up story's and writing on a daily basis, but I don't hate my old work as much as I did years ago :)
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:iconhavetales-willtell:
HaveTales-WillTell Featured By Owner Feb 3, 2013  Professional Writer
So would it be fair to say that at this point, you're a master at creating and plotting out stories, and rapidly closing in on the mastery of putting actual pen to paper (or finger to keyboard, as it were)?

Or do you consider yourself to have already mastered the process, and what's left is refining your style?
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:icondamaimikaz:
DamaiMikaz Featured By Owner Feb 3, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Well... it's quite hard to determine for yourself whether you mastered something or not. I don't think one can judge himself so objectively. But I do know that, in the sense of storytelling and world creating, I'm at least very close. I've been talking with many people on the subject over the years, and I noticed how I can easily match up to people that are way older than I am and have created way more professional works, in that sense.
As for writing itself. I feel like I'm getting close. My style still changes, but it's a matter of years, not a matter of months, like it always used to be. There are still many things I feel like I need to, and need to try, in order to see what I'm actually capable of. But I've at least found a writing style that I'm comfortable with, and that has some emotional impact on readers.

I guess I'm on the right track :)
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:iconhavetales-willtell:
HaveTales-WillTell Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2013  Professional Writer
Since writing, like learning, is a lifelong journey, I'd say that "on the right track" is the best place for you (or me, or anyone) to be. 8-)
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