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January 5, 2013
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Poets! Who do you read?

:iconlucy-merriman:
Lucy-Merriman Featured By Owner Jan 5, 2013  Student General Artist
You want to be a writer, you've got to read a lot. Which seems kinda obvious, and pretty much all writers would agree. And yet! I know far, far too many novice poets who don't read poetry, except for what's assigned in class if they're in school, or maybe their friends' work.

Hopefully, this is not because they are being willfully ignorant or arrogant; rather, they don't know about all the great poetry out there waiting to be had! I honestly think this might be the case, because I didn't read a lot of poetry outside of class when I was just starting out, and some passionate recommendations were just the thing to kick me into gear.

So: questions!

1. Who are your favorite poets? What do you like about their work?

2. Is there any poem that has just stuck with you?

3. Have you ever memorized a poem?

4. Is there any poetry genre that interests you and you'd like to learn more about? (eg, Eastern, Spoken Word, Traditional Western, Free Verse)

4. If you could only recommend ONE chapbook or anthology, what would it be?

THE RULES:

*Don't promote yourself! I'm going to say this right now: If you are your own favorite poet...hot damn, I can't even finish that sentence, I'm literally headdesk-ing. Just, get over yourself. That is all.

*You can use a dA poet or a dA poem to answer ONLY ONE question. All the other answers should be from somewhere else. If you don't know any poets off this site, now might be a great time to start exploring!
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Devious Comments

:iconthetaoofchaos:
thetaoofchaos Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2013   Writer
1. Plath, Kerouac, Ginsburg, Snyder, Stevens . . . eh, maybe a little Whitman, Keats and Emerson thrown in.  i don't read enough.

2. sure.  i think the one that sticks with me the most is Mexico City Blues by Kerouac, because there's no way you can ever become completely familiar with it.

3. i've memorized a few lines - never a whole poem.  if i could remember a whole poem, i'd remember two:  Kubla Khan by Coleridge and Long Island Chinese Poem Rain by Kerouac

4. i'd like to explore more visual and found poetry methods, perhaps.

5. New Oxford Book of American Verse

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:iconjamberry-song:
jamberry-song Featured By Owner Jan 14, 2013  Professional General Artist
1. Ezra Pound, T.S. Eliot, Walt Whitman, Maya Angelou, Robert Frost, Wallace Stevens, Alfred Lord Tennyson, Robert Browning, Lucille Clifton, Anne Carson, Denise Levertov, Edna St. Vincent Millay (when she's not translating others' poems), Elizabeth Browning, Emily Dickinson, Gregory Corso, Billy Collins, Margaret Atwood and I know there are some I'm forgetting. I really like things with powerful imagery and/or powerful rhythms (I like Maya Angelou almost exclusively for her rhythm).

2. There are quite a few. T.S. Eliot's "Lovesong of J. Alfred Prufrock", Edna St. Vincent Millay's "Renascense" and "Recuerdo", Wallace Stevens's "Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird", Denise Levertov's "O, Taste and See", Robert Frost's "Nothing Gold Can Stay", Alfred Lord Tennyson's "Ulysses", Gregory Corso's "Marriage", Allen Ginsberg's "Supermarket in California", Maya Angelou's "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings", Ezra Pound's "In a Station of the Metro", Emily Dickinson's "Because I Could Not Stop for Death", Robert Browning's "A Toccata of Galuppi's" and "My Last Duchess", Margaret Atwood's "Siren Song" and "You Fit Into Me", Anne Carson's "VI. To Clean Your Hooves Here is a Dance in Honor of the Grape which throughout History Has Been a Symbol of Revelry and Joy Not to Say Analogy for the Bride as Uncut Blossom"...

3. I've memorized more bits of poems than whole poems themselves, but I have managed to memorize the entirety of three: "Nothing Gold Can Stay," Robert Frost; "I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud," William Wordsworth; "In a Station of the Metro," Ezra Pound.

4. There's always more to learn about poetry.

5. I have four: "Leaves of Grass" by Walt Whitman, "The Beauty of the Husband" by Anne Carson, the collected works of T.S. Eliot, and Charles Baudelaire's "Les Fleurs du Mal" (but NOT Edna St. Vincent Millay's translation).
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:iconlucy-merriman:
Lucy-Merriman Featured By Owner Jan 14, 2013  Student General Artist
We had to read a few different translations of Le Fleurs du Mal in my college Freshman English class, and I think it's really interesting how differently the translators approach the works. Makes me wish I learned French so I could read it myself.
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:iconjamberry-song:
jamberry-song Featured By Owner Jan 14, 2013  Professional General Artist
Writing is usually best in the native language, it's true, but you're right. Each translator brings their own interpretations to the piece they're translating.
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:iconwordeea:
Wordeea Featured By Owner Jan 13, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
well my list will be useless to you because it is all about french poets and references ... english is my second language and even though i "write" in both languages (and translate poems), i have read mainly french poets. furthermore, i only started writing again about a year ago after many many years of not reading much. so i am diving back in. with all that said, here's what i have been reading/liking lately

1. Who are your favorite poets? What do you like about their work?
miron, grandbois, nelligan, mallarmé, cros, hugo, beaudelaire, neruda, t.s. elliot . i like the imagery. simple words to say things.

2. Is there any poem that has just stuck with you?
jeune fille by gaston miron

3. Have you ever memorized a poem?
yes. several

4. Is there any poetry genre that interests you and you'd like to learn more about? (eg, Eastern, Spoken Word, Traditional Western, Free Verse)
fixed forms, traditional western. i like having to count and think and think and find the perfect word to fit my ideas

4. If you could only recommend ONE chapbook or anthology, what would it be?
"L'homme rapaillé" by Gaston Miron - I believe it is translated into english.
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:icongpbaratheon:
GPBaratheon Featured By Owner Jan 10, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
you know...i don't have a favorite poet and to be perfectly honest i hardly ever read real poetry.

but i do have one poem that i absolutely love it is an old Japanese poem:

Though I go to you
ceaselessly along dream paths,
the sum of those trysts
is less than a single glimpse
granted in the waking world.

-Ono no Komachi
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:iconlucy-merriman:
Lucy-Merriman Featured By Owner Jan 10, 2013  Student General Artist
Wow, that's lovely.
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:icondrippingwords:
DrippingWords Featured By Owner Jan 10, 2013  Student Writer
I read everyone. What now XD Just kidding.
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:iconlucy-merriman:
Lucy-Merriman Featured By Owner Jan 10, 2013  Student General Artist
:D
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:icondrippingwords:
DrippingWords Featured By Owner Jan 12, 2013  Student Writer
The only poetry I read for pleasure is on dA. The only other poetry I read is for school assignments XD
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