Shop Mobile More Submit  Join Login

Details

Closed to new replies
December 2, 2012
Link

Statistics

Replies: 233

do you have trouble with negativity?

:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
As one aspiring writer criticizing another aspiring writer, do you find it hard to be honestly negative (with or without constructiveness)?

I feel like I'm being too soft, but I'm also not going to give some poor kid a hard time if it looks like they've barely gotten their feet wet.

Bonus question, do you think this shift in attitude (if it really is one) will ever be reflected in how editors, agents, and publishers communicate with authors? Points for the best analogy.
Reply

You can no longer comment on this thread as it was closed due to no activity for a month.

Devious Comments

:iconworldhero:
WorldHero Featured By Owner Dec 8, 2012  Student Filmographer
I actually have the same issue as you do; I have a hard time giving out negativity in my critiques. Dunno if it's because I don't like hurting people's feelings, or because the person hates any type of negative comment on their work. :shrug:
Reply
:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner Dec 8, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I mostly have a hard time being negative because I can't tell if they can take it. D:
Reply
:iconworldhero:
WorldHero Featured By Owner Dec 8, 2012  Student Filmographer
Yep..That's my reason too. :iconsadtruthplz: It's why I hardly give out critiques at all...Most people just can't take them. :shrug:
Reply
:iconthetaoofchaos:
thetaoofchaos Featured By Owner Dec 5, 2012   Writer
I don't like being negative with feedback, but I have a magic trick. If I'm specifically asked to critique something (as opposed to prowling around the critique enabled pieces, randomly choosing something to disassemble) then somehow I feel absolved of all guilt or apprehension when I have anything critical to say. Maybe it helps me to convince myself that my insight is actually wanted. Also, I try to apply the venerable golden rule when commenting, avoiding indiscriminately trashing something and steering away from criticizing the artist instead of the art - which is a finer line than some might think.

Speaking of the shift in attitudes, do you mean that being more critical of an artist's work will help acclimate said artist to what it will be like in the cold, cruel publishing world? Are you suggesting some should serve as a drill sergeant to aspiring artists, a la full metal jacket? Because, I can tell you that in that scenario, I'm going to be private Pyle.
Reply
:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner Dec 8, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Yes, I do that too! Ad hominem has never been my style. It's a waste of time.

Excellent, but worrisome, metaphor. :salute:
Reply
:iconthetaoofchaos:
thetaoofchaos Featured By Owner Dec 8, 2012   Writer
Apparently, I can be worrisome on occasion.

Cheers!
Reply
:iconevildoctorhobbit:
EvilDoctorHobbit Featured By Owner Dec 4, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
I'm an actor, but I think I can still answer this question (since I've basically played around with everything else :P). For me personally, I prefer feedback (positive or negative) over no reactions whatsoever. When somebody tells me that I'm not doing something right, whether it's nice, rude, or non-constructive, it still helps me because it gives me another opportunity to improve what I'm doing or grow in some way (even if it's just people skills!)

Of course, initially the criticism stings. It is hard to hear something bad about yourself or your art- especially when it's something you've worked on for a long time (whether it's a monologue, or a story, or a picture). However, I think as an artist, it's important to be able to handle and take all forms of critique - and if there's nothing constructive about it whatsoever, you need to to just let it go and not hang on to it.

To be a critic, however, is another art on its own. You don't want to be the person who only says 'this is bad', but gives nothing constructive. It actually shows a lack in your knowledge. If you know how to fix the problem, tell them. If you don't, admit it but just point out that the problem should be looked at. In my opinion, you can never be too hard on growing artists.

On the other hand, don't tackle obviously new writers (artist, actors) with material and knowledge only the pros have. Everything is learned in steps- as a critic, you have to understand where the person is at (beginner, moderate, etc) and meet them where they are at.

I don't understand the last question, so I won't answer. :lol: ;)
Reply
:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner Dec 4, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Close enough!

"let it go and not hang on to it" - so much this.

And yes, good critics work hard at it! I've received some pretty confusing ones myself from people trying to be over nice.

Awwwww.
Reply
:iconevildoctorhobbit:
EvilDoctorHobbit Featured By Owner Dec 4, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
:bow:

:shrug:
Reply
:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner Dec 4, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
:clap:
Reply
Add a Comment: