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April 26, 2013
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how much should i charge for my art???

:icontakama:
Takama Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2013  Professional Artist
this is not a price for my da art but for big beautiful posters 22" by 28" i deal in mostly anime but the posters take at least 16 hours or more to make. so how much should i charge for them? What would be fair? if it differs a price of comition art and for cuz i felt like drawing it art would be nice... ^.^
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:iconhannalemoine:
hannalemoine Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2013  Student Traditional Artist
What I do is search for related items online and price around that. I went on etsy to sell a large blue marlin painting I did and I found similar paintings that were the same size. I kind of priced around them.

It's a very good idea to see how others price their art online. I ended up pricing my painting at 400 dollars which is a lot but a good deal comparatively to other paintings.
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:iconstarlit-sorceress:
Starlit-Sorceress Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2013  Professional Artisan Crafter
Either charge by the hour or by the square inch. From what you described, though, your posters are pretty impressive in both aspects.

Anything less than $100 is definitely underselling yourself.

Don't get discouraged if they don't sell. It just means you have to improve your skill, your marketing, or both.
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:iconvineris:
Vineris Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
I'd charge between $400 and $600 for a traditional work that's about 2' per side. But I'd probably get better at art before I tried selling to people. That's a starter price for a really big work, but people who pay that price for art are rather unlikely to pay for fantasy art that is so simplistic.
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:icon290pika:
290Pika Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2013  Student Filmographer
Do you print the posters from a computer, or are they done manually? Are they one of a kind or printed in multiples?
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:icontakama:
Takama Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2013  Professional Artist
one of a kind by hand. id like to charge a lil more fore black and white (pencils) cuz i think they look nicer and take twice as long compared to color...
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:icon290pika:
290Pika Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2013  Student Filmographer
Oh! So they're large pencil drawings, not necessarily "posters". I gotchya. :nod: I was thinking you were printing posters.

As with any commission or sold artwork, definitely factor in the time taken as well as how much you think your skill is worth. You can always adjust your prices if it doesn't work out; just don't undersell yourself.
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:icontakama:
Takama Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2013  Professional Artist
i just don't no a good starting price.... what would you charge for somthing like this as a big poster

[link]
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:iconmythicsonofgod:
MYTHICSONOFGOD Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I don't think the time you use to make it is very important for the client. The client won't care at all about how you did it but what you achived.

If you buy a tv, would you pay extra just becuase the manufacturer took longer to assemble it?
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:iconstarlit-sorceress:
Starlit-Sorceress Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2013  Professional Artisan Crafter
I'm pretty sure manufacturers take into account how many hours/minutes of factory operation and employee wages go into each TV.
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:iconmythicsonofgod:
MYTHICSONOFGOD Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Of course they do. But they don't expect to survive the competition by being unefficient.
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:iconstarlit-sorceress:
Starlit-Sorceress Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2013  Professional Artisan Crafter
Of course. Ultimately it's up to the amateur artist to decide whether to undercharge in hope of sales, or charge a fairer price, and possibly not sell.

I would personally prefer to potentially get fewer sales, but charge what I feel my work is worth.
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:iconkafine:
kafine Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2013   General Artist
I understand the point you are trying to make; that you won't fetch a fair price for a crappy drawing just because it took you a long time. But I think that analoge is misleading, because the implication is that they should charge less regardless of labour hours and not recoup the expenses it took to create the item.

The solution is not to go into buisness untill you have developed a product that you CAN sell for what it cost you to make.
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:iconmythicsonofgod:
MYTHICSONOFGOD Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I didn't mean to imply that. But nussiness do exactly that when their product is not selling as fast as they want (hence the reason we have sales offer and discounts).

However I agre in your solution
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:icontakama:
Takama Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2013  Professional Artist
thats true but some people pay by hours like if you were putting together a website
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:iconmythicsonofgod:
MYTHICSONOFGOD Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
yeah but they also tend to have deadlines.
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:icontakama:
Takama Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2013  Professional Artist
)=( yeah so what would you charge should it depend on the deadline then the less time i have the more it coasts
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:iconmythicsonofgod:
MYTHICSONOFGOD Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
good luck :)
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:icon290pika:
290Pika Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2013  Student Filmographer
Your argument doesn't make much sense. A manufacturer has to spend a certain amount of money on equipment and workers to make a certain amount of televisions. If a television is more complex and takes longer to make, they're going to have to pay more to keep the equipment and workers working longer so they'll sell the television to the retailer for a little bit more money, and this cost trickles down to the consumer when they purchase it.
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:iconmythicsonofgod:
MYTHICSONOFGOD Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I disagree. First I am using a n analogyto express an idea, it doesn't make sense if you think it is the same thing.Second you misunderstood what my analogy was about

If two manufacturers create an equal quality tv but one of those took longer an is charging you more. You aren't getting bonus point from your client.

If a costumer sees a low quality drawing, they won't pay a high price just becuase it took a long time. If anything a client could get upset if you take much time for something that shouldn't.
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:icon290pika:
290Pika Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2013  Student Filmographer
Equal quality or not, the time spent will trickle down to the consumer. The great thing about art, though, is that "quality" varies with the view of the consumer (whereas with a working product, like a television, it either has good picture quality or it doesn't; there's very little haziness as far as what is working and what's not).

Personally, I think both the time AND skill of an artist need to be taken into account. If you invest 16 hours of time into something, no matter how shitty it turns out, are you going to charge a couple bucks for it if you intended to sell it in the first place? You'd be better off getting a minimum wage job. Skill, of course, should be a factor as well (as well as the primary factor).
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:iconmythicsonofgod:
MYTHICSONOFGOD Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
personally I think costumers don't care.
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:icon290pika:
290Pika Featured By Owner May 2, 2013  Student Filmographer
If someone's going to commission a work from an artist, it's probably not an arbitrary decision and the customer probably does care about time, effort, and skill put into their work and are paying for it. :shrug:
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:iconmythicsonofgod:
MYTHICSONOFGOD Featured By Owner May 2, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
absolutely. But they have to like the artwork first.

I am criticizing artist expecting the costumer to care about such things before having them care for their artwork.
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:icon290pika:
290Pika Featured By Owner May 2, 2013  Student Filmographer
Some customers do. Some don't. The ones that don't are usually people that don't respect the work and time being put into the finished product. This sort of ignorance to the work involved does not just include artists, but also industries such as computer repair, landscaping, and lots of other services that also include a final product. You can't expect a decent result without a certain amount of time being put in; that's why many places charge by the hour as well as have a starting rate.
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:iconvineris:
Vineris Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
Yeah, but businesses care. If you can't charge enough to cover your time and materials your business sucks and it's going to die a horrible death. The business owner's job is to either convince the customer that the product is worth the price, or to make a product that the customer wants enough that they will pay a fair price for it.

You might as well be arguing that nobody should charge anything because if you have two equal TVs and one of them is a fair price and the other is free, the customer will take the free TV. There is a balance between the business's needs and the customer's. You can't rob the business to make the customer happy.
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:iconmythicsonofgod:
MYTHICSONOFGOD Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
If your product isn't good your costumer will go with the competition isn't of worrying about how much it took you to make it.

Perhaps It's becuase I come from a country where labor fairness doesn't always work. If one tv was free of course the costumer will go to the free product always. In fact that's a bussiness practice today. Give away something free to "earn" your costumer loyalty in the long run.

Console manifacurers for instance sold at a loss just to earn their costumers and regain the money in other ways.

I am not saying it's fair. I am just saying that's what happens in reality and it's unrelistic to expect a client paying more because it took you longer when he can simply go with the competttion for a better product or a even a product that is both better and fasterly made.
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:iconvineris:
Vineris Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
I'm not saying that it's fair either, but if you don't find a way to make the customer give you enough money to cover your expenses and time then there is no point in having customers at all because you will go out of business. That's the bottom line. If your business costs you $20 per hour to run then you'd better charge $25 per hour to your customers. If you are charging $15 for a product that costs you $20 to make and you aren't making up that money in a different part of your business then your business is dying and having more customers only makes you go into debt faster.

This is often obscured by the fact that artists subsidize their business with a day job or their parents' money. But if you want to run a viable business instead of messing around, your business MUST turn a profit.
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