Shop Mobile More Submit  Join Login

Details

Closed to new replies
January 7, 2013
Link

Statistics

Replies: 19

How do I approach asking an artist about his technique?

:iconongakuman:
Ongakuman Featured By Owner Jan 7, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I've always liked anime/manga art style and I have been trying to learn in since I was 12. Im 15 now and I've made good progress but I noticed that manga/anime is not just one concrete style an have been experimenting with stuff but I'm getting nowhere. Well recently I've stumbled across a deviant with a style and technique I LOVE LOVE LOVE(ITSSOAWESOMEOMGURTHEONE) and I would like to learn from his style.(its good to know more than one style isn't it?). I've seen really good artists before but it's the first time I can say I have a favorite. (*ntdevont) I have been carefully analyzing his style but its been really going sucky and I'd rather just ask him about his technique. He has directly stated on his profile that he absolutely does not do tutorials and I'm not asking for one. I don't want to come across as unoriginal or a copy cat or just another hopeless fan. Do you think its okay to ask? How should I go about it?
Reply

You can no longer comment on this thread as it was closed due to no activity for a month.

Devious Comments

:iconkafine:
kafine Featured By Owner Jan 8, 2013   General Artist
I don't see why you shouldn't just come out and ask the things you want to know. I mean, don't expect an essay in return because he's got other things to do today. But artists are just people, not some sort of royalty that you need to be "in the circle" to talk to.

Just try and make his job (answering) as easy as possible. So avoid asking questions in very general terms like "how do you make pictures?" that requires a long answer and that's not fair. Limit yourself to one or two specific questions that can be answered quickly.

If he doesn't want to answer he can just ignore you, and if that's what he chooses then leave it be.

Since you're a beginner I think rather than asking about the finer points of his style it might be an idea to ask him something about how he learned to draw in the first place. You've not got a sound basis in the fundamentals yet so I think this should be your area of concern. It's okay to have artists whose stuff influences your process but you can't really expect to skip any steps by reproducing what they do, because what they do is the result of having gone through all the steps. I hope that makes sense

Best of luck
Reply
:iconglori305:
Glori305 Featured By Owner Jan 8, 2013
Depends on how popular he is, and how possesive he is of "his" technique.

You can always try asking. But don't do a "OMG! this is so great, how do you do that?" comment, but something specific "I really admire the way you have mastered light and shadow, can you give me any pointers on this?" And expect either a "no" or a very brief answer in response.

No one is going to sit down and tell you exactly how to duplicate their style. Quite frankly most artists with a noticable style will not be able to tell you how, because they developed it organicly, working on skills and techniques, continuing to refine those they did like, and leaving behind those they did not like until they had a recognizeable style develop all unknown to themselves.
Reply
:iconwezenbeesje:
wezenbeesje Featured By Owner Jan 8, 2013  Professional General Artist
Why do people say it's not a good idea to ask? I'm always happy to help and I see people asking questions as appreciation. :)
Reply
:icongagglygoo:
gagglygoo Featured By Owner Jan 7, 2013
Why ask him? Just copy it yourself, it shouldn't be that hard. What colors the person uses, what anatomy she/he uses and so forth. If this ain't working out, then you probably need to grind at the fundamentals.
Reply
:icongagglygoo:
gagglygoo Featured By Owner Jan 7, 2013
Oh and also, just sit down and copy a couple of his drawing. Some will come out looking really close, and sit down and think what you did to your drawings to make them look like his.
Reply
:iconsomedaysakuhin:
SomedaySakuhin Featured By Owner Jan 7, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Nah, I wouldn't recommend asking the artist. You most likely won't get an answer or they will be pissed that you ask the same thing as many, many others. =/

Also, mind their FAQ:
"Q: Can you make a tutorial of...
A: I DON'T MAKE TUTORIALS PLEASE STOP ASKING IT FUCK PLEASE!!!"

It's not the same but at least similar.
So better learn yourself by applying tutorials that are already out there.
If you want to get closer to that certain style, analyse the anatomy, apply standard cell shading and some nice sparkling effects and you're there!
Reply
:iconongakuman:
Ongakuman Featured By Owner Jan 7, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Theres the word "cell shading" again :I

Now that you quote him, it makes the logical action to just not ask him. I guess I won't. Thanks for your insight!
Reply
:iconsomedaysakuhin:
SomedaySakuhin Featured By Owner Jan 7, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Yes...? XD
It is cell shading after all. =/
At least most of the gallery, I didn't look through everything yet. ^^'
He seems to use softer shades only rarely.

No prob. :3
Reply
:iconvineris:
Vineris Featured By Owner Jan 7, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
I looked at his work and it doesn't look like he does anything special. It's just plain cell shading with a little bit of digital painting as far as I can see. So... you can ask but even if he answers, I don't think it's going to be an answer you particularly like. A lot of what he does is the result of him training his mind to notice certain things and then remembering those things. And what's he supposed to do to get that knowledge to you? Stand behind you for the next three years going "notice that" "remember that"? That just isn't going to work. You need to train your brain to notice and remember things. When you do that, you will draw better.

"I don't want to come across as unoriginal or a copy cat or just another hopeless fan."

I think it's way more important to not come across as a selfish, irritating nuisance. Remember that an artist is an artist, and a teacher is a teacher. An artist wants to spend most of their time *making art*. If they had wanted to teach, they would be in a classroom right now. Now, some artists don't mind teaching, so it's worth asking. But if you're going to ask, then *be respectful of the artist's time*. Ask politely, directly, sincerely, only once, and if they don't answer or don't want to do it then let it go.
Reply
:iconongakuman:
Ongakuman Featured By Owner Jan 7, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Your answer is incredibly insightful though I have some questions. First, when you say cell shading what do you mean? I'm new to digital art, I dont know the terminology. Second, you say, "A lot of what he does is the result of him training his mind to notice certain things and then remembering those things", if you could elaborate on "certain things" it would be immensely helpful. Your analysis at a glance carries much needed information! Thank you for taking your time to answer!
Reply
Add a Comment: