Shop Mobile More Submit  Join Login

Details

Closed to new replies
December 29, 2012
Link

Statistics

Replies: 19

Fandoms and creativity

:icondabrandonsphere:
DaBrandonSphere Featured By Owner Dec 29, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
As everyone on DA should have noticed by now, there is a huge fandom culture on this website. Actually, the fandom culture of fan art and fan fiction pervades large tracts of the Internet in general. I for one find very little appealing about this whole fandom stuff. I understand why fans of certain franchises may feel inspired to draw or write about their favorite characters, and I can't really oppose it, but I could never devote the greater bulk of my creative energy to producing fan art or fan fiction. The reason for this is that I don't like to work within the constraints of some other writer or artist's universe. I find much more joy in designing my own characters, settings, and plot lines. At least then I get to write the rules myself and don't have to worry about faithfulness to another creator's canon.

In the rare event that I do write fan fiction or draw fan art, I usually "redesign" or modify the characters or their environment to better fit my own personal tastes. I don't find much joy in simply replicating someone else's design the way most fan creators do. I've even seen fan artists copy entire screencaps, right down to the very last detail. They don't even bother to put their own spin on the copyrighted subjects they are depicting. On the other hand, I could never do without putting my own distinct spin on whatever I'm drawing that differentiates it from the original.

I wonder what it says about my creativity that I don't like participating in the online fandom culture? How do these fans manage to stick to their pet franchises' established rules when writing or drawing their fan creations? How do they muster the self-discipline to replicate a product faithfully and resist the temptation to tweak it to their own liking? As I understand it, being able to work within limitations marks a very creative mind.
Reply

You can no longer comment on this thread as it was closed due to no activity for a month.

Devious Comments

:iconschris91:
schris91 Featured By Owner Dec 31, 2012  Student Filmographer
Is the end of your original post intended to be sarcastic?
Reply
:iconmeganmissfit:
MeganMissfit Featured By Owner Dec 31, 2012  Student Digital Artist
I actually don't like drawing fanart at all. I guess I just simply don't like any series well enough to get a real kick out of doing tribute artwork. It is quite restricting, having to adhere to a character's outfit, personality, setting, etc. Usually when I draw fanart, it's nowhere near as good as my original work. To each their own I guess!

What I do NOT approve of, however, is doing fanart for the sake of popularity. If you actually don't like ponies, but draw ponies anyway because everyone else likes ponies = no
Reply
:iconnonecansee:
nonecansee Featured By Owner Dec 30, 2012  Hobbyist
Often, fan art is a spring board for artists: to get a job at the studios the characters were created at, to figure out their own style, to practice techniques, etc. Sometimes, they just like to do it to relax or unwind from thinking for themselves for a change. Fan art is also a way of flattering the creators of the characters (despite the copyright infringement, eheh ^^;).

For some people (maybe people like you :) ), making your own decisions comes easy but for other people (haha, myself included), it's more comfortable when there are predefined rules.

Either way, we produce beautiful results after much practice and feedback. If we hit a low point, there's nowhere to go but up. And when we reach a ceiling, there's a limitless sky to achieve.
There's nothing to question about your creativity here :)
Reply
:icondamaimikaz:
DamaiMikaz Featured By Owner Dec 29, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Well, I guess everybody has his own interests.
I never bothered doing fanart as well, because there are so many amazing fanarts out there already, that I feel I have nothing to add to them. I do like doing fanart of other people's (small) projects, because I like giving my personal interpretations of how characters look and such. And it's often because I know the creator in person then, and I like to share ideas with them :)
Reply
:iconoperaghost:
operaghost Featured By Owner Dec 29, 2012  Professional
I believe it's way of saying thank you, when you do fan art, but when one dedicates too much of own talent to re-create someone else's ideas - then it's kind of sad. I have done fan art myself and I like to draw my favourite game characters (i.e. Blizzard Entertainment has a lot of interesting lore characters to try to draw), but every time I do so I feel it is not really my work and there are people who do it much better than i do at 1st place.

But that's just my humble view.
Reply
:iconvineris:
Vineris Featured By Owner Dec 29, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
You have your own interests and obsessions, other people have theirs. This thread reads a little too much like congratulatory back-patting at the expense of other artists.
Reply
:icondabrandonsphere:
DaBrandonSphere Featured By Owner Dec 29, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Maybe so, but I was feeling a little down when I typed that.
Reply
:iconvineris:
Vineris Featured By Owner Dec 29, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Yeah, that happens. But it's not really helpful to make comparisons with other people, because that's not what art is about. Art is about pursuing what you find interesting and worthwhile. I find that most of my unhappiness comes from focusing on other people too much, and the most helpful thing I've found is to just get away from them for a while. Other people aren't the important bit. The work is. Sometimes people aren't going to be in tune with that work, and at that point you have to let them go, because otherwise you just get bitter and it starts poisoning everything.
Reply
:icontheartofcbyoung:
TheArtOfCBYoung Featured By Owner Dec 29, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Not every piece of art that someone makes needs to be a groundbreaking creative masterpiece. Sometimes you just draw or write something because it's a quick piece of fun. I've done some fan art from time to time, and it's seldom to show off my boundless creativity, I drew it because I liked the original, and it was fun. And there is nothing wrong with that.

Not to mention, few and far between are the artists that make a living solely on creating exactly what they want to when they want to. If I want to pay rent, I have to do some replication.
Reply
:iconsachi-pon:
Sachi-pon Featured By Owner Dec 29, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
i dislike this idea that fanart is somehow less creative than original art. just because you're interpreting someone else's character doesn't mean you aren't still interpreting them in the way YOU choose.
Reply
:iconnonecansee:
nonecansee Featured By Owner Dec 30, 2012  Hobbyist
um, the thread started because the user felt like she wasn't as creative as fan artists seem to be, what with working within preset rules and all ^^;
Reply
:iconcirprius:
Cirprius Featured By Owner Dec 29, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I didn't start drawing fan art until recently in my history of drawing. I used to sketch characters waaaay back when I was a kid, but I never actually focused on fan art until recently. After doing so, I have learned that just because you are working to different rules, you don't loose your creativity. Instead, you find different ways to be creative.
Reply
:iconnonecansee:
nonecansee Featured By Owner Dec 30, 2012  Hobbyist
Absolutely correct! :D
Reply
:iconglori305:
Glori305 Featured By Owner Dec 29, 2012
Working within specific limitations is part of creativity. If you draw a person with a mouth off center, people will point out that your anatomy is off, it will look wrong. Then are just using more restrictions on their art than you are on yours. Does not make one more creative, or less. And professional artists generally have very strict guidelines that they have to work within, often set by someone who is not an artist, but in marketing and is basing those restrictions on what will sell, rather than what is best for the idea/theme/plot that is being expressed. Says nothing about your creativity, or theirs, just says something about your prefered work styles, they like the challenge of working within specific restrictions, you like the challenge of designing every detail.
Reply
:iconcapturedjoe:
CapturedJoe Featured By Owner Dec 29, 2012
I find it fairly original if I draw a Portuguese dragoon as fanart for a historical mod for a PC game.
Reply
:icondjedra:
Djedra Featured By Owner Dec 29, 2012  Professional Writer
As I'm sure you know, I create Bleach fanart. I've written my own stuff in the past. This is simply what inspires me at the moment. I could give a very lengthy explanation of the process etc, but then I realised it all comes down to simply one thing - if you put your heart and soul into creating a piece, it works.

I've no great interest in copying another's work entirely. That's a skill, but doesn't involve creativity per se. The greatest pieces of fanart, be they pictoral or written, are those which the artist / author has put their everything into, and in those cases, the art is very much theirs, with credit to the author who created the world and characters, obviously.

You know when you write your own stuff and you become very fond of a character? (I have. I wrote my two novels set in Egypt over about seven years. I knew everything about those characters and they were like friends!!) Well, I never thought I could have that with fan-writing, but I do. I didn't invent the characters, but I 'know' them now as if they were my own and they seem to act of their own volition, the way my own characters do once I've worked with them for a while.

I think fanart is a very creative process, which has different challenges to creating your own stuff. It's not the case that people do fanart and then gradually develop an independent style. (Well, if it is, you can consider what I'm doing now a backward step). It's something I choose to do at the moment, particularly as the style of Bleach is very complimentary to my own style. (It throws in a lot of humour while my own style is quite dark. When I put the two together, I find it adds new dimensions).

I hope this answers some of your questions.
Reply
:iconfluffpuffgerbil:
fluffpuffgerbil Featured By Owner Dec 29, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I'm mostly a fan-artist, but for a few consecutive months, I was focused on my own book and characters and improving and writing about them, but recently found that passion burning out. I'm sure I'll come back to it once I've had a nice break(that usually happens) but for now, my creative juices/ideas have been revived by Doctor Who and I'm currently in that 'honeymoon' stage with it and all my art ideas. xD


As far as this question goes:
I wonder what it says about my creativity that I don't like participating in the online fandom culture? How do these fans manage to stick to their pet franchises' established rules when writing or drawing their fan creations? How do they muster the self-discipline to replicate a product faithfully and resist the temptation to tweak it to their own liking? As I understand it, being able to work within limitations marks a very creative mind.

---
Simple, I have my own art style(or, am working on developing it) and draw the characters in that. I experiment with it, and since I found out I prefer drawing more realistically proportioned cartoons, I can work on finding and refining that style, and using people I already have a design for, so to speak helps me figure out how to draw them in my own style while still trying to keep them recognisable as the person I'm trying to draw. So, I sorta do tweak it. If I'm drawing an anime/manga character, they'll end up more realistically proportioned and more detailed, but if I'm drawing a real person, they'll be cartoonified, less details, but still more detailed than really simple cartoons, and still be realistically proportioned. If anything, the eyes might be a little bigger. But not stereotypical anime huge. What I have in my gallery is NOT a good example since I drew all those(save for the one Doctor Who pic) before I decided what I wanted to draw. I've just been practicing traditionally and any digital thing I've drawn isn't finished or I haven't wanted to upload it.


I've seen some amazing fanart that, though uses characters not belonging to the artist, still portrays neat ideas, good drawing, etc. On the flip side, I've seen some TERRIBLE screencap redraws that make me want to hit my head against a wall.

Same goes for original art. Just because it's "original" doesn't mean it's good.
Reply
:iconpix3m:
Pix3M Featured By Owner Dec 29, 2012   Digital Artist
May as well share two pieces of MLP fan art that has been very well-received by people:


^ The artist took a couple of oligarchs from the show and portrayed them as ruthless emperors. Strangely, it makes total sense.


^ The artist took two sisters and created a story that takes place in the future. Both characters are older than their canon appearances so the artist added their spin to how these characters may look if they are older.

I think these artists are creative enough to know how to use ideas not of their own and still show you can still be very creative without relying on using OC's.
Reply
:iconpix3m:
Pix3M Featured By Owner Dec 29, 2012   Digital Artist
Some of the best fan art I've seen my fandom produce actually do have a good amount of creativity put into them by adding their own spin with somebody else's ideas. Times where people have reproduced vectorized versions of backgrounds or characters traced from screenshots are meant to be used as resources, fellow fans will very easily scoff at them for the exact reasons you do.
Reply
Add a Comment: