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December 24, 2012
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Ink is a dangerous god...

:iconant1-her0-project:
Ant1-Her0-Project Featured By Owner Dec 24, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
It's incapable of forgiveness. Ink, as a medium doesn't seem to get the credit it deserves. I'm not knocking any other medium, but paints, pencils, and digital mediums are far more forgiving.. In my opinion, ink artists are the unsung heroes of the art world.
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:iconkalitu:
Kalitu Featured By Owner Dec 31, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Bonjour!
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:iconmiraveldi:
Miraveldi Featured By Owner Dec 31, 2012
Even though I'm more of a digital artist, I love working with ink. There's just something about bold, permanent black that I just love. I also find that drawing with something so permanent can be more fun; you have to learn how to incorporate your mistakes into the finished piece, and often as a result end up with something more interesting than you intended.
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:iconvillekat:
Villekat Featured By Owner Dec 31, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I don't do it often but I LOVE working with ink. Yes it's very unforgiving and basically perminant but that is what I love about it. If you mess up you HAVE to work it into the peice, you have to change the direction of your peice or at least your perception. It keeps you on your toes.
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:iconruuku-kabe:
Ruuku-Kabe Featured By Owner Dec 31, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I feel the same way. I recently started using ink now that my standard drawing skills have come up to par. And this statement hits my thoughts on the bullseye. I wish soooo many times that I could just flicker that one little tenth of a centimeter line off, but nope, instead I have to sacrifice the entirety of the image by thickening the lines. Lol.
But if you get used to it and get it right, ink is probably, in my opinion, one of the most beautiful art forms out there! ^_^
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:iconnonecansee:
nonecansee Featured By Owner Dec 30, 2012  Hobbyist
Oh yes >.< As a hobbyist, I only work with ink, especially when I do my line art. I especially want to work on comics but I'm finding that the inking IS the biggest hurdle, haha. I know I can pull off styles and work on anatomy, perspective, etc. quite easily but proper inking technique is the most difficult skill to learn, haha.

Let's not forget people who do calligraphy, tattooing and other similar crafts involving ink.

There's something about ink that's so permanent and rigid and, yes, unforgiving. If you make a mistake, the mistake screams at you, haha.
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:iconrayaroja:
Rayaroja Featured By Owner Dec 30, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
I use a lot of ink, it takes so much concentration that I recently became self-conscious of the fact that I don't blink when I ink.
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:icontetchist:
Tetchist Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
this is such an insane post. why did you make it?
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:iconant1-her0-project:
Ant1-Her0-Project Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
To get your attention! It finally worked!! Hi.
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:icontetchist:
Tetchist Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
another terrible reply in a terrible thread.
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:iconant1-her0-project:
Ant1-Her0-Project Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
And yet, you keep bumping it to the top. You don't really understand how this works, do you?
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:icontetchist:
Tetchist Featured By Owner Dec 29, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
I lose nothing by having other people call you stupid.
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:iconant1-her0-project:
Ant1-Her0-Project Featured By Owner Dec 29, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Well, I certainly appreciate the new hits on my work and profile, so by all means, continue.
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:icontetchist:
Tetchist Featured By Owner Dec 31, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
but everyone think you're an idiot.

so.
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:iconant1-her0-project:
Ant1-Her0-Project Featured By Owner Jan 1, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
You're still promoting me. Keep up the good work, kiddo
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(1 Reply)
:iconshellpresto:
shellpresto Featured By Owner Dec 27, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
I actually find working in ink more freeing at times. Many times the ability to erase, or hit "undo" can lessen the impact of art. How many times have you drawn a sketch that somehow loses it's umph when you do a finished piece? Or erase an expression or pose, redraw it better technically, but find that it's lost that intangible energy or feeling it had the first time around? Or lost some important detail while inking over a pencil line?

Sometimes when you skip the old 2B and go straight for the bottle you gain a confidence, a clarity with knowing you are going to capture that first impression the first time. You also get the freedom of not stressing over your lines -- when it's done, it's done, you can't -- and therefore don't have to -- go back. The artist's regret isn't there, because it can't exist anymore.

It is actually my goal to reach the point where I can go straight from blueline/layouts to finished inks, and the rare occasions where I can do it are enthralling.

Ironically, I've actually found watercolor much more difficult, because of the light touch required -- ink actually seems easier because it's black and not black with no middle ground. The ability to endlessly add to watercolor often ruins mine, because I can't leave well enough alone and every coverup turns it muddy and dark.
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:icondjinnkitty:
Djinnkitty Featured By Owner Dec 26, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I wouldn't go so far as to say it's the hardest. It requires a lot of patience, and favours those who like to detail things down to the sub-millimeter level. It's my personal favourite, though.
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:iconmattcombsart:
MattCombsArt Featured By Owner Dec 26, 2012
ya i think with inking you have to have a lot of confidence and not be afraid to commit with your work. Cant be afraid to mess up and have to be confident in what your doing.(for it to be not stressful and fun lol) if you mess up you cant erase you have to work with mistakes to fix things. it can be tough. I miss inking i wish i wasnt on this "no holding lines" thing atm lol, id love to get back and ink some stuff.
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:iconant1-her0-project:
Ant1-Her0-Project Featured By Owner Dec 29, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
I agree, but I'll admit, I also enjoy the fear of making a mistake. I experiment a lot, and never practice first or just do loose sketches. I think it's the chasing of perfection and the fear of failure that fascinates me so much.
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:iconredmarlin:
redmarlin Featured By Owner Dec 25, 2012
I love ink. I have a Sumi-e stick and grindstone, bamboo brushes and even a bamboo pen (not the digital one, I mean a pen made out of actual bamboo). It's so much fun. But to be honest, I don't mind if I make a mistake, or even if I see a mistake on someone else's piece if they're working in ink. A little imperfection here and there shows that someone was behind it.
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:iconhmontes:
HMontes Featured By Owner Dec 25, 2012  Professional General Artist
As a cartoonist I worked in ink for many years. Yes, it can be unforgiving and I admired the inkwork of some of the great comic artists of the past. Most notably Will Eisner and Wally Wood. I even taught myself to ink with a brush like they could.

What is interesting is when I saw some actual pages done by past comic artists. They weren't clean. They had correction paint and whole panels redone and pasted over. So even the old masters of ink art made mistakes.

It may be a dying art unfortunately. I see less and less tools for making ink art in the art supply shops. At one time I could find a large selection of inks and pen nibs. Now all I see are felt tip pens and Copics. NOT the same thing.
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:iconshininginthedarkness:
Thank goodness for the internet, in this regard. I'll always have a place to buy nibs!
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:iconhmontes:
HMontes Featured By Owner Dec 25, 2012  Professional General Artist
That's so true. In fact I found this place to be a good source of them >>> [link]
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:iconshininginthedarkness:
Oh, thanks for that link! My gracious, vintage! I'd be afraid to use it! Not that expensive though....

Here's where I get mine [link] I guess it's got more modern stuff.
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:iconhmontes:
HMontes Featured By Owner Dec 25, 2012  Professional General Artist
Ah, thanks or that link. The portable light table they have would be great to do animation with. At one time Pendemonium had grab bags of various nib pens they sold for a low price. Got some interesting ones for my collection. I even found some sets at eBay including some boxes of nibs from Russia.
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:iconcbwebb:
cbwebb Featured By Owner Dec 24, 2012
I also completely understand what you're saying and I agree. If anyone actually sees the work of professional inkers in person... that stuff is AMAZING, and takes years and years of practice to accomplish, simply because it's capable of showing even the slightest flaw in handling. I've only recently started using it (again), and it's so incredibly frustrating, and easily the least forgiving medium. I know someone mentioned watercolor, but as someone who works primarily in watercolor I have to say that there's no comparison. Ink makes watercolors look like the most patient, repairable and forgiving medium on the planet.
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:iconant1-her0-project:
Ant1-Her0-Project Featured By Owner Dec 25, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Exactly! Cats like Andy Brase are gods amongst men!
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:iconcbwebb:
cbwebb Featured By Owner Dec 25, 2012
Andy Brase was EXACTLY who I had in mind with that response. Absolutely brilliant.
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:iconant1-her0-project:
Ant1-Her0-Project Featured By Owner Dec 25, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
He's a beast!
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:iconodditiesbyernie:
OdditiesByErnie Featured By Owner Dec 24, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
I understand exactly what you are saying... I work in Ink, acrylic, charcoal, Oils, wood, pretty much anything I get inspiration for... and Ink is one that work with alot - I love ink - but once it is on paper - its there!
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:iconant1-her0-project:
Ant1-Her0-Project Featured By Owner Dec 25, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Exactly!
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:iconmischievouspooka:
MischievousPooka Featured By Owner Dec 24, 2012
I never found ink to be unforgiving. But I do like inking more than the other mediums.
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:iconhiyoi:
hiyoi Featured By Owner Dec 24, 2012
'In my opinion, ink artists are the unsung heroes of the art world.'

Are you sure you're not just saying that because you work with ink? ;P
Though I love ink, I can't say it's any less forgiving than, say, watercolors.
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:iconant1-her0-project:
Ant1-Her0-Project Featured By Owner Dec 25, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Oh, this is totally about my personal bias, I assure you! LOL..

Watercolor is closer to ink than paint, I think.
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:iconbustermaximus:
bustermaximus Featured By Owner Dec 24, 2012
Feeling a bit hyperbolic this evening, are we?
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:iconant1-her0-project:
Ant1-Her0-Project Featured By Owner Dec 24, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
To you, I suppose.
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:iconbustermaximus:
bustermaximus Featured By Owner Dec 24, 2012
Unsung heroes and unforgiving gods? We're talking about ink drawings, here, after all.
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:iconant1-her0-project:
Ant1-Her0-Project Featured By Owner Dec 25, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
To you, that's all it is. They're much more than 'just' drawings to me. To each his own.
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:iconbustermaximus:
bustermaximus Featured By Owner Dec 26, 2012
If you really want to get to know the unforgiving nature of the ink gods, try praying at the altar of the press sometime.
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:iconant1-her0-project:
Ant1-Her0-Project Featured By Owner Dec 26, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
My downstairs neighbor does carved press printing (assuming that's what you mean?). I don't see that as a medium for perfection-seekers though.. He does some really cool work with it though!
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:iconbustermaximus:
bustermaximus Featured By Owner Dec 26, 2012
Printmaking is absolutely a perfectionist's craft. There are four major methods of printmaking: intaglio, lithograph, seriograph (screen printing), and relief (which is what I assume your neighbor does, based upon the word "carved".) Really, any sort of printmaking has the capacity to be extremely exacting, and with all of them, you don't really get to know how well you've succeeded at your task until your final pull.

Even relief processes like woodcut are deceptively involved. The methods and materials tend to yield work that can often seem somewhat loose, but don't be fooled. It can be as intricate and elegant as you wish to make it. For example, just look at something like Hokusai's Great Wave off Kanagawa or Durer's Four Riders of the Apocalypse as examples of just how precise you can be with carved wood and ink. Indeed, creating a drawing is really only the first step in the process.

If you have a spare ten minutes, here's my favorite video showing the woodcut reduction process. She makes seven passes on a single plate, and it is beautiful. Then, by all means, go visit your neighbor and talk some shop. Maybe even see if you can't try your hand at it, yourself, because -- I'll let you in on a little secret -- you're already working in a style that emulates printmaking. The graphic chunks, the separations of values, the hatching, the heavy lines... everything about your work is calling for the press. You should seriously look into it. You may just fall in love.
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:iconbustermaximus:
bustermaximus Featured By Owner Dec 26, 2012
Sorry, I always ad an "o" to serigraph.
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:iconant1-her0-project:
Ant1-Her0-Project Featured By Owner Dec 24, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
I personally don't do any of those things, other than making mistakes opportunities, but that also requires skill and imagination, I would argue..
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:iconshininginthedarkness:
I'm so used to working in ink, and its limitations, that I'm almost paralyzed by the infinite reworkability of watercolors. With ink, you just move on. With watercolor, you could always go back and fix something. I don't know how people do it :lol:
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:iconant1-her0-project:
Ant1-Her0-Project Featured By Owner Dec 24, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Ha! I could see that.
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:iconshininginthedarkness:
Not really true, there are plenty of ways to correct an ink mistake.
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:iconant1-her0-project:
Ant1-Her0-Project Featured By Owner Dec 24, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Such as?
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:iconbustermaximus:
bustermaximus Featured By Owner Dec 24, 2012
Correction fluid, cut and paste, paper layer stripping, and, of course, simply working over it.
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:iconshininginthedarkness:
Well, there's the easiest one, encapsulated by the saying 'There are no mistakes, only opportunities." As in, incorporate the supposed mistake into the work. Obviously this isn't easy when the piece is lineart, but if there's any sort of shading in the piece, it's quite easy.

Secondly, there's white paint. You can use gouache or what's called 'pen white'. This won't cover up a big blob, but used with discretion, it can totally obliterate a mistake.

Third, there's actually scraping the mistake off the paper with a pen knife or razorblade. This is a bit difficult, and I'm sure I personally never do it quite right, but in the right hands it works. You have to start with thick paper.

If the piece is just meant for reproduction, you can also glue a small piece of paper over the mistake area. Or just fix it digitally if it's meant to be displayed online anyhow.

That being said, in a non lineart piece, I often am able to complete one entirely without resorting to any coverups. And I'm a klutzy, mistake-prone person. It's just that if you plant the work, work lightly and build up texture, it's easy to catch a mistake before it's gone past the point of no return.
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:iconant1-her0-project:
Ant1-Her0-Project Featured By Owner Dec 24, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
It's incapable of forgiveness. Ink, as a medium doesn't seem to get the credit it deserves. I'm not knocking any other medium, but paints, pencils, and digital mediums are far more forgiving.. In my opinion, ink artists are the unsung heroes of the art world.
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:iconsteelmantis:
Steelmantis Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Then where do you place sculptors that work in stone?
If I follow your train of thought correctly? sculpting in stone would be the king of kings as there is next no recovery from
a mistake made in stone.
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