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December 11, 2012
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Helping oil paint dry

:icontrollgirl:
TrollGirl Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Hey guys,
Would it be ok to put a painting with a thin layer of oil paint to dry in front of a fan?
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:icongenny-raskin:
Genny-Raskin Featured By Owner Dec 12, 2012  Student General Artist
Good question, and good answers. :)
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:iconxadrea:
Xadrea Featured By Owner Dec 12, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Galkyd or Liquin Original will help your paints dry to the touch more quickly, but oils don't dry through normal evaporation, so remember that putting one in front of a fan won't help much ;)
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:iconolvium:
Olvium Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
I am as well suggest you to use Liquine medium as many wrote. You have liquine original or liquine details by W&N, they both are great. I use liquine original, it has yellow-brown color (has no effect on the oil tones) and a jelly structure and it is very nice and easy to use.

When you paint you have to mix 1/3 or 1/4 of liquine on 2/3 or 3/4 of oil paint on your palette. When I use it, almost all of the oil is dry after 3-4 days - which is nice.

But remember that all the advantage of oils is what they do not dry fast, therefore the painting results are of better quality because you can mix the paints right on the canvas.
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:iconjoeyv7:
joeyv7 Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012
I've used Liquin and a fan to speed drying. The fan helped . . . a bit :shrug: As far as mediums go, I'd be inclined to try the Japan dryer mentioned below. Liquin was nice but kinda *meh* on drying quickly.
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:iconrachaelm5:
rachaelm5 Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
All I can say is that it is this very problem which chased me away from oil paints when I was in college. "I want to take it home to show my mommy TODAY, Professor!" Yeah, that doesn't work. Hence the colored pencils. I'm very impressed with other folks' suggestions, though, and I'm glad you have so many skilled artists who can offer good advice!
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:icontrollgirl:
TrollGirl Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Incidentally i'm painting something for my mommy who's awesome and deserves some classically done art. Alas, i'm an impatient bastard...
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:icongenny-raskin:
Genny-Raskin Featured By Owner Dec 12, 2012  Student General Artist
But the patience will eventually totally worth the effort. ;)
Is that a birthday present?
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:icontrollgirl:
TrollGirl Featured By Owner Dec 12, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
The whole "delayed gratification" idea is intolerably christian.
Yep, it is.
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:icongenny-raskin:
Genny-Raskin Featured By Owner Dec 13, 2012  Student General Artist
Why do you give the credit to Christianity only? What about Buddhism as a religion? Or about few philosophies of martial arts? Like Thai Chi, and practices such as yoga, meditation... And so on and so forth...

Cool. :)
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:icontrollgirl:
TrollGirl Featured By Owner Dec 14, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Because the christianity has perfected the idea of suffering needlessly before getting something you want and could get much earlier.
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:icongenny-raskin:
Genny-Raskin Featured By Owner Dec 14, 2012  Student General Artist
Yeah, but in this case you don't really have anything to do to speed the process up.

And the practices I mentioned do not refer for waiting to something to happen as to suffer, rather for being patient for things to happen in their due times.
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:iconshaunmichaeljones:
ShaunMichaelJones Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012   Traditional Artist
Im afraid you can only add medium to oil paint to help dry it faster. Oil paint doesn't "dry" through evaporation like other paints but oxidises with the air so a fan cant speed it up. Thats why i use acrylics, which dry too fast, so i guesss you cant win either way.
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:icontrollgirl:
TrollGirl Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Yes, i share that emotion :D
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:iconmew-sumomo:
Mew-Sumomo Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012  Student General Artist
You can try using a drying agent such as Japan Drier. That one's a bit toxic but I bought this resin that I just mixed into my turpentine that was able to dry my paintings by the end of the day or sooner. It was meant to both make the paint glossier and accelerate the drying process, but I didn't mix it into the paint itself like I think you're supposed to and it did its job wonderfully.
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:icontrollgirl:
TrollGirl Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Thanks for your input =]
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:iconpotato-pirate:
Potato-Pirate Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
Oil paint dries from the inside out so using a fan won't speed anything up :/
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:icontrollgirl:
TrollGirl Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Trolly is a n00b :(
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:iconpotato-pirate:
Potato-Pirate Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
Naw we all have to start somewhere :D There are a lot of artists here with very good suggestions, so you're in the right place :D
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:iconsecretplanet:
secretplanet Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
i wouldn't fan it, but it will certainly dry quicker in a nice cosy room! and painting the underlayers with a bit of "lean" medium mixed in speeds things up too!
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:iconkyteglory:
KyteGlory Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012
That depends on whether or not you want them to last.
If you don't give a shit if your paint is cracking and flaking five years down the road, then stuff your painting in the oven at a very low temperature.
If you do give a shit if you paint is cracking and flaking five years down the road, then there's really nothing you can do to dry paint once it's on the canvas.

Don't try putting your painting in front of a fan/hitting it with a blow dryer. It won't speed the drying, and it'll blow dust particles onto your painting.

One thing you can do, if you haven't already done the painting, is switch to quick-dry mediums. With the right medium, you can reduce your drying time to a matter of hours.
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:icontuolumney:
tuolumney Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012
Once it's painted, don't mess with it. In the future use Liquin (or other alkyd) medium. Or just use alkyd paints.
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:iconshirobutterfly:
Shirobutterfly Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012  Professional General Artist
Oil paints dry faster with heat. Try putting it by a fire place or on the dash board of your car that's on the sun. A fan would slow down the process of drying for oil paints. That's why it it was not suited for northern Europe as it snowed there and what not. It was found more in Southern Europe where they had no idea what know was lol. Also like it was stated, certain oils can help it dry faster and let the paint to spread more as oil paint on it's own will not go far. I hope this helps!
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:iconfooly-cooly:
FOOLY-COOLY Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012  Student
Leave it be. In the future if you want oil paintings to dry faster, mix your turp/solvent with some portion of galkyd or other substance that has the effect of causing oil paint to dry faster.
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:iconjesseacosta:
JesseAcosta Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012  Professional General Artist
I've heard stories from Frank Frazetta tossing his oil paintings in the oven to get them to dry quicker for rush deadlines. I wouldn't recommend it, but if you do a google search you can read many people's experiences doing this and maybe find a safe method.
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:iconbustermaximus:
bustermaximus Featured By Owner Dec 14, 2012
Yeah, considering that Frazetta was a working illustrator, and he only needed the work to be dry enough to transport and photograph, it doesn't seem to me that he was giving much consideration to the painting as an art object. I second your warning for oven curing the paint. Hell, considering that half the pigments and solvents involved are nasty stuff without applying heat, I'd say that it's probably not a healthy thing to do, either.
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:icondebit:
Debit Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Oil 'dries' by oxidation, which is why it dries slowly. Painting oil has numerous carbon-carbon double bonds which are attacked by oxygen from the air. (This is the same process experienced by vegetable cooking oils going stale if it is exposed to air.) Adding a few drops of cobalt dryer speeds up the drying process as the metal ions help to attract oxygen. Even with the addition of dryer chemical, oil will still dry at a much slower rate than acrylic. If adding such a dryer, do not overdo it; you only need a few drops at the most.
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:iconwilwhalen:
WilWhalen Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
The only things I've ever had luck with was a drop or two of cobalt drier in my linseed/turp medium, or just using a liquin medium. A thin coat would usually 'dry' in about 12-24 hours depending on the color - of course not completely dry, but if it's thin enough it will have contracted about as much as it's going to and shouldn't crack the above layers. Japan drier is another option, but I've never tried it - I've heard tell that it can yellow your paint after it dries.

I don't think there's much you can do once the paint is down. I've also heard of the oven trick, but never been brave enough to try it.
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:icontrollgirl:
TrollGirl Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Gotcha. I'm kinda cowardly too, when it comes to messing with the paintings. Cowardly and impatient, bad combination XD
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:iconvineris:
Vineris Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Oil paint doesn't dry by evaporation so I doubt that the fan is going to do anything.
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:icontrollgirl:
TrollGirl Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Is there anything else you'd suggest, or as above, 'leave it be'?
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:iconvineris:
Vineris Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
I can't really suggest anything because all the ones I've done I've let dry on their own. I've heard of some people trying to dry them in a slightly warm oven or out in the sun. I have no idea how effective that is or whether it will cause the painting to crack. If you have to hand it in for a school assignment it might just be easier to put it in a holder and hand it in wet. If it needs to be sent off somewhere for the holidays, I doubt it will dry quickly enough to guarantee that it won't smear when you ship it.
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:icontrollgirl:
TrollGirl Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Thank you for your input =]
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:iconcinderblockstudios:
CinderBlockStudios Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
the only risk there is that the airflow of the fan may cause the paint to "run"
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:icontrollgirl:
TrollGirl Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Assuming the airflow is light and distant enough, is the risk eliminated?
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:iconcinderblockstudios:
CinderBlockStudios Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
probably, but then it wouldn't really dry now would it.
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:iconeuterpe-the-egret:
Euterpe-The-Egret Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
Once it is painted you shouldn't try to dry it quicker.

There are things you can put into your paint that will help it dry faster before you start. These can yellow your paint over time though, so you should read more about them before using them. You can also paint in thinner layers that will allow it to dry faster.

Trying to dry it quicker than normal can just cause your paint to crack.
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:icontrollgirl:
TrollGirl Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
I've heard that cracked paint only happens if the layer is thick. I already paint in thin layers. In your opinion, they'd still crack?
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:iconeuterpe-the-egret:
Euterpe-The-Egret Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
If you rush their drying, yes. As I said, once the paint is on you just have to leave it alone.
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