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November 28, 2012
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Need to take a step back in shading.

:iconecoste:
Ecoste Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012
So, I decided to draw a still life a day, for 100 days. Fast forward after reading a lot of books and buying some CTRL paint tutorials, I'm on my 13th still life. I've gotta say, it's no longer super frustrating to start the still life, and try to get the proportions right. I feel like it's much easier now to draw the still life, and I have improved a lot with my line drawing since the 1st time I tried.

Anyway, around the 10th still life I decided to add in shadows. And I realized that I jumped ahead by a bit. So, the drawing comes out looking something like this - [link]

I honestly laugh when I look at it, because it's so bad lol. Now, I'm asking you where I should start with shading. I've gotta take a huge step back and try to just understand the values first, what are some of the exercises to help me do that? And, I have no problem picking up a real pen and pencil. So, please, suggest me what I should do to understand lighting. Maybe, even recommend a book. The 3 books that I have read slightly touched on shading, but it made little sense to me.

So yeah, hopefully I can improve my shading, just like I did with my lines.

Cheers.
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:iconmattcombsart:
MattCombsArt Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012
its good your seeing results with all the hard work.

Id suggest to not worry about painting it digitally for now till you get better (digital can be tricky since you need to know the correct tools to make something, so dont worry about it for now). Traditional will be easier to learn with imo....

At this point your going to be wanting to be focusing on lighting and shadows more..so i would set up a lamp over an object in a dark room and do studies of the stuff. Sit down and look at it before drawing, really look at whats infront of you and then try to draw that, pay attention to everything. I would get yourself some charcoal sticks and some blending sticks. It will be easier to do shadows with charcoal since you can blend it out easier then led. Then you can you an eraser to put in the highlights. slowly building up the values.

Heres a link that shows how he use charcoal from start to finish.[link]
Thats kinda the process of building it up. its very light at 1st then he slowly builds up the values to create a more natural look, then just putting a ton of charcoal down and making it look really messy.

You have the right attitude. Stick with it, it will all come with time. Learning art was like this for me also. I would work on one thing, get better at that. Then when i moved on to something new i would really see where i was lacking and then work on those areas. Its a constant back and forth of doing this to learn. Its all trial and error, just mess around with a technique, if it works cool, if it doesnt cool. I say just mess with different techniques to find the ones that work for you and take the things that help you and apply that into your workflow. It just takes time :)
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:iconecoste:
Ecoste Featured By Owner Nov 29, 2012
Again, I will look into that :) Thanks, maybe this will work for me, maybe not.
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:iconmattcombsart:
MattCombsArt Featured By Owner Nov 29, 2012
ya just experiment, see if it helps, just keep at it :)
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:iconfionacreates:
FionaCreates Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012  Professional General Artist
An exercise to start shading is to just use black and white and concentrate on the tones as opposed to the colours. Also try drawing straight with the shade and not the lines first and block things out with shapes. It's just another way to draw. If you're doing 100 you've got a lot of time to experiment :D
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:iconecoste:
Ecoste Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012
Thanks for the suggestion, I will definitely try that :) And yes, I try to do a still life a day. Usually end up making 5 a week, out of 7. So, going strong :)
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:iconfionacreates:
FionaCreates Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012  Professional General Artist
Still life is a great way to learn to draw, in my experience learning to draw is simply learning to see. Except I am thankful that I learned to draw as a child and through my teenage years before I was old enough to give up or not bother to learn. So I commend anyone taking positive steps to improve their art and just enjoy the craft of drawing.

I remember reading "Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain" at university and doing some of the exercises but a lot of them I was like "wow.. I did that in high school, I did that too" so it turned out my high school teachers were simply teaching that book xD
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:iconecoste:
Ecoste Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012
Ah yes, I've read it. I myself am in High School, never even picked up a pencil before to draw. I have no idea why I decided to just get a tablet and start drawing to be honest. Pretty bad still, but everyone was bad at one point. And, really helps that I can feel and see the improvement in my line work.

About the book, it helped me 'see' those lines. But, that was about it. Especially that I only do the things on my tablet. Now that I'm thinking about it, never have I done a still life with a pencil. Will have to try that very soon. Anyways, thanks a ton for the advice you have given me. Will definitely give it a try :)
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:iconfionacreates:
FionaCreates Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012  Professional General Artist
I love my tablet to bits, but I prefer drawing with a pencil and scanning for further work. I can draw digitally but I find the marks are not the same to me. The flow is wrong. But I also know people who work 100% digitally because they just hate drawing with a pencil. So art is all personal.
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:iconecoste:
Ecoste Featured By Owner Nov 29, 2012
Thanks. I will still try the other ones, if I no likey, I no worky with it :)
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:iconcinderblockstudios:
CinderBlockStudios Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
it's not bad at all. The only issue here is the confusion on a particular light source. the best thing to do is observe objects from real life. Get a mug or something shine a light on it from one side (make sure there are no other lights in the room, this includes natural light) and see the way the shadows and highlights are cast.
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