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November 24, 2012
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Do you see improvement?

:iconblackrosekane89:
Blackrosekane89 Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2012  Professional General Artist
First off, I hope it's ok to put this here (Mods feel free to move lol)

I started digital painting about 2 1/2 weeks ago. I did my second compelete painting last weekend. Last night I did a similiar painting to try fix up on some flaws I had seen in my last one.

Here is the first (my second painting) one Here is the attempt to improve on the idea

The biggest things I was trying to improve on the completeness of the overall painting and the skin smoothening/color. What do you think?
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:iconpringlesaddict99:
pringlesaddict99 Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
What, you drew these paintings in a period of two weeks?! No, of course you didn't improve (much), you should ask people if you improved every six months or so.

And since you started painting digitally a short time ago, I think your paintings are amazing! I started painting digitally 5 or 6 months ago and I got used to my tablet just recently.
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:iconblackrosekane89:
Blackrosekane89 Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2012  Professional General Artist
Thank you very much.

I'm more asking if I improved in these "certain" areas (as I specified heehee). I know the overall won't be that much different. For example I asked "did I improve on the smoothing" I'm more looking for the possible answers of "no, but you could try using *tool* to not make it too smooth" or if someone said yes, then I would know I applied by smoothing tools I used correctly and can work from there.

I'm really asking more on a technical side rather then "AM I AN AMAZING ARTIST NOW???????" lol.
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:icondigitalisvitae:
DigitalisVitae Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2012
Less digital. More life drawing. Learn construction - the features are all random sizes, bent at odd angles, and sliding off the subject's faces.
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:iconblackrosekane89:
Blackrosekane89 Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2012  Professional General Artist
Thanks. I do know how to draw traditionally fairly well though
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:icondigitalisvitae:
DigitalisVitae Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2012
I see a lot of the same problems carried over in terms of spacing features, construction depth, and balance. In the first image, the eyes are at two different heights and apparently depths (due to the values) the nostrils are skewed, the mouth appears painted on, and the dress and arm both look like two dimensional objects. The hairline and shape makes the kid look like a pinhead, and the ears look deformed.

Number two has most of the same problems - this all springs from jumping into the drawing directly from the photo, without creating head construction and guidelines; without keeping the awareness of being a 3d object inside your head while trying to work from a flat image. Drawing from life will help with this.

The tiger is likewise skewed and sliding to the left, with his left eye and cheek being significantly off, and the body lacking dimensionality.
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:iconvineris:
Vineris Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
You're not going to be like one of those little kids that insists on being measured every day just in case they've grown 1/64" inches overnight, are you? Real growth is slow, you can't tell anything from one painting to the next. Do a few hundred more and then see whether there's a difference between the first and the last.
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:iconblackrosekane89:
Blackrosekane89 Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2012  Professional General Artist
Ive had some flaws pointed out and I wanted to some help in discerning if I'm going in the right direction. It's always to good to ask for critiques. I'm not some "little kid". I've been drawing for over 10 years, so please spare me the education. There were a few things I wanted to improve on and I wanted to make sure I'm doing what I'm suppose to. Geez this is why I never ask for critiques. I always get a snobby answer.

If wanna critique my work that's cool, but a good artist should constantly be asking if what they're doing is right/wrong.
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:iconvineris:
Vineris Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
"I'm not some "little kid"."

It was an analogy.

"It's always to good to ask for critiques."

If you had specifically asked for a critique I wouldn't have said anything. Anyone can ask for crit at any time but expecting improvement in two weeks is crazy talk. How you ask for something makes a big difference in the response you get.

"If wanna critique my work that's cool, but a good artist should constantly be asking if what they're doing is right/wrong."

I don't think so. In fact I think that's a big mistake. To make something innovative and significant you might have to wander off into areas that will seem "wrong" to people. People can't read your mind to see the direction where you want to go. They can't read the future to see what destination you will actually end up in. So they will mostly steer you into places where they feel safe and comfortable. It's all right to ask for opinions once in a while but in general charting your own path and thinking for yourself will be a lot more useful to you in your development as an artist.

Yeah, we all know the 20-year-old who never gets critiques and claims their crappy work is just "their style" but the problem isn't that they never listen to critiques, the problem is that they do the same thing over and over. If they're willing to change they will probably become a better artist than someone who is always following other people's instructions.
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:iconblackrosekane89:
Blackrosekane89 Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2012  Professional General Artist
I don't think, especially with digital, that expecting some improvement in a short amount of time is crazy talk. There is so much technical and I am still learning what tools do what, that it makes a difference.

For example this is my first painting I didn't know how to apply layers correctly. This was all one layer. So I tried doing a manual, gradiant type background. I smudged the background badly and smudged parts of her hair into the background. In the next one, I knew how to apply a gradiant fill as a back ground layer, seperating the subject from the background so she is not smudged into the background . Little things like make a huge difference and even though I am very knew to digital painting, I can still apply these little technical tweaks that will change the impact of my work. I know the skill won't be that significantly different, but suggestions on when/how to use tools, if I applied this tools better then the last time, can still be a help to me, even this early in the game.

"the problem is that they do the same thing over and over. If they're willing to change they will probably become a better artist than someone who is always following other people's instructions" Again, I am in no way new to art. Why assume I'm just blindly following instructions? Someone told me not to use the greyscale method for paintings. But I don't follow that advice because doing greyscale just works better for me. I simply want to absorb all of the technical knowledge I can and experiment from there.
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:iconkami-ato:
Kami-Ato Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
1. The whole kid question was a bit much, if you put it that way it does seem offensive
2. Can't you just answer his question with an answer and not start off your answer with a question?
3. I've noticed your painting has indeed improved in the shading department so good job on that.
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