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November 17, 2012
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want OC's to look brighter i need some help

:iconfrosen24:
fROSEn24 Nov 17, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
ok i have been drawing and coloring for awhile now and know enough about photoshop and paint tool sai but i have a few questions about the colors and tools that some of you all use. I want to know how do these artist make their base colors so bright like this:[link] and this [link] can yall really help for example my works look kinda dull like this:

i mean i like my color and its nice but it doesnt stand out like the examples that i showed
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:iconfrosen24:
fROSEn24 Nov 17, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
you all have given me excellent answers i can finally see where you are coming from
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:iconfriendlyhand:
FriendlyHand Nov 17, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
Hi,
It's mostly about value [link] and the style of cell shading used.

In this [link] notice that the background is dark grey and black (dark values) the skin tones are about 50% very light tones with some medium and very dark shades of the same colors (no white highlights). The rest of the coloring is handled the same way.

In your first example, the background is white and about 80% of the skin is a medium value with this slivers of dark shadow and thin pure white highlights.

studying anatomy, perspective and lighting will also help you improve the technique.
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:iconnarutokunobessed:
narutokunobessed Nov 17, 2012  Student General Artist
You mean higher contrast? That has to do with your color pallete and light source.

In the pictures you shown in street fighter, the colors are like pale and brighter while the shadows are cooler and darker.

And also if you look closely, the shading done is not pure black (like all the muscle of ryu's arm) is not a pure black. It is tinted slightly to blue or red. For alot of comics, try to think of saturation, and color wheel in relation to value. This is why people say light theory and color theory are important. They are kind of the same essence.

So fall back on color theory. Under ryu's chest in that second picture, there is a reflective light.

I suggest to combine these tutorials together:

[link]




However, there is some technique that they do make it glow a bit, but even so, having the colors down first and right, will give a better result.
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:iconfrosen24:
fROSEn24 Nov 17, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
ok and last question how in the world can you download photoshop and then how do you apply them to the actual picture like in the skin or how people make textures really cool backgrounds?
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:iconnarutokunobessed:
narutokunobessed Nov 19, 2012  Student General Artist
Appolgies. Not really how it's essitially an arm. Its essentially how to shade, so its more aplicable then say a style or a type of art period.

Texture is an elment of art actually. Light plays a strong roll, telling how close the object is to the light source. The further light source, the more obscure the texture is, the middle give some texture, and further away, blurs some texture. It can also atmospheric perspective or how much depth an object gives.
[link](visual_arts)
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:iconfrosen24:
fROSEn24 Nov 19, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
oh thank you but i worded the question wrong i know about all the programs and yea i know its up to the artist i been working on all different programs for awhile and there really isnt a difference. I just never knew fully how to add textures that you can donwload and use them in photoshop. i know how to download em but as far as using the to blend in with the picture i am clueless.
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:iconnarutokunobessed:
narutokunobessed Nov 22, 2012  Student General Artist
Ok, you understand that. You just need to retrive textures,,

Adding textures, theres alot of ways to do that. If you want it to like repeat like a background as in a tiled background, you can use layer options, fill bucket, etc. First you need to create the repeating pattern, and then you need to added it to your pattern library. You just open a new file to any size preferably small sized. Then you retrieve the pattern by going edit>define pattern, name your pattern and add it. Your made pattern is there.

To retrieve packs, you need to find where you can see the pattern box. For me, Ive only found it through the fill bucket or as a CS Feature as I believe ( have CS4), there is a layer style option (which can be found by double clicking a layer) that you can use a pattern to fill a background. But any way, either one, they open the same dialogue box that has a pattern set and an arrow to a side. Again not sure if its the same, but bear with me. Click that arrow and click present manager. Opening a new dialogue box, Then click load. It will open a new dialogue box and then find your pattern. Now you can load a pack.

There is also style type patterns which Im not sure how to apply.

Now on to applying to a layer. All you do is mess with the layer options. Multiply or overlay works. For fill, you need it on a seperate layer, but for layer style option you can mess with the layer options there too. After setting to multiply or playing with the layer options, you just now need to cut it out. The best way for backgrounds is to use masking. Not sure what button is yours, but for mine, its a grey rectangle with a white circle, and make sure your on the layer of what your masking. Once your there, click your grey rectangle with white circle. Now you can mask out what you don't need. Its done by using the brush. Take your brush, and use the black to take out the things, but using white to put it back. Thats the great thing about masking because, your patterns that you want are never truly gone. They are just painted over.


And pretty much that is it. Some times it helps to turn off the multiply so you can see if you missed any masking layers, which means you can do the masking first or multiply.

There is a ton of tutorials on how to apply packs and stuff if you don't understand. You have the internet.
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:iconnarutokunobessed:
narutokunobessed Nov 19, 2012  Student General Artist
Its only partially about the programs, rather how you use the fundementals to the program itself. You can download photoshop, but if you have a brush and eraser, you can make art like anime. Its just a reminder that its never just the program. Photoshop is downloadable at their website.

If you really think about it, all the programs have the same basic thing, a paintbrush, and eraser. Pretty much limit your self to learn the fundamentals with a simple brush and slowly build up.

Now fundimentals. Why these fundis. Well its pretty much because its applicable to all art. Take a simple shape like a square. You can mold that in to an arm by streching and squashing. A cylinder is essentially two arms put together. After a few anatomy lessons (like muscles and bones), you can tweak the arm to be more realistic. And then after anatomy, you can know its form completely and now you can understand how to shade. Thats a combination of color theory.

Did you read all of it? You probably understand how it essentially an arm. Especially PSG's tutorial, where the color of the sphere is closely related to a skin color in the day time.
[link]
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:iconensoul:
ensoul Nov 17, 2012  Professional General Artist
It's not really about the brushes when it comes to that effect. I'm gonna assume we're talking about the colours specifically and not the style.

Your colours are technically brighter. They're getting that 'brighter' lighting effect by mainly using desaturated colours (look at those pale pinks, purples and flesh tones) to give the effect that they're washed out by a bright light. It also makes the colours in the shadows look that much darker by comparison.
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:iconpuppy-dangerous:
puppy-dangerous Nov 17, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
Your base colors are different, for one.

But I think you're talking about the way it's shaded, which makes it read 'bright'. It's called 'cell shading'. Use hard edges and a much darker tone than your base.
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