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April 28, 2012
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Drawing Tablet

:iconstingray970:
stingray970 Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I have a particular question I want answered (which will be below) but feel free to just discuss Tablets in general!

Drawing with normal supplies has gotten tedious. The paper I use to draw doesn't provide me enough room to have more than a single character. I also only have Crayola colored pencils which give an absolutely horrid look. I'm looking to try my hand at digital art. (I already have programs for it, my sister is a graphic design artist.)

I've saved about $100 (not much, but I'm 14 and do not have a job) and wish to spend it. I would preferably like to get a tablet. I've been informed at SOME point in time that I could obtain a cheapy tablet for around $100. Is there any truth in that? Also, would it work well? There's no point in buying something that won't work at all. If not, how much would a well working tablet cost?
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Devious Comments

:iconio-t:
Io-T Featured By Owner Apr 29, 2012  Student Digital Artist
A word of warning though, when looking for a tablet I really wouldn't risk any amount of money on anything but a wacom. They're the industry leaders for a reason and if you spend most of your time learning around the pitfalls of a laggy tablet your work is going to suffer for it. The bamboo line is very reasonable and if you can scrape 20 more bucks together the bamboo fun is on sale on amazon for 117 for a really great tablet [link] I use an older bamboo fun myself, upgrading from a small wacom graphire which still runs perfectly 7 years later, I just got the new one as an upgrade. You can actually get the graphires for obscenely cheap used these days as well. The bamboo craft and pen as well as a few of the other models can be had new and refurbished for 60-80$ as well, so just do a quick search in amazon and you can get a decent tablet within that range really easy.
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:iconstingray970:
stingray970 Featured By Owner Apr 29, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I was reading the product details and some reviews and it seems that that tablet is a more multi-purpose use. Namely both replacing a mouse and drawing.

I plan to use it for art solely, and I believe that a cheaper product would achieve the same result. (At the least, it appears there's no difference in quality between the "Fun Tablet" and a slightly less expensive one)

Would [link] give acceptable results?
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:iconio-t:
Io-T Featured By Owner Apr 29, 2012  Student Digital Artist
The difference is in the size actually, which was why I upgraded from my old graphire. When you're used to working on paper, having a smaller tablet area can be hard to adjust to and the fun is the largest you can get for the price range. Similarly sized tablets are all in the 200+ range. The pen and touch has the same pressure sensitivity as the fun though, but the plain pen one has half the sensitivity, so it really depends on what you're looking for.
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:iconstingray970:
stingray970 Featured By Owner Apr 29, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Larger sounds a lot better. I was under the impression that the fun was just better for overall use as opposed to art specific. I remember my sister had a hard time with her first tablet because of size, it'd be nice to minimize the relearning.

Suppose I'll go with the fun then, thanks!
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:iconio-t:
Io-T Featured By Owner Apr 29, 2012  Student Digital Artist
Usage is the same across the board since they have the same sensitivity, the fun just has a few more extras that I personally don't really use (I prefer the mouse), and the nicer size. Size counts for a lot to me though and after using the fun I can't go back to my mini graphire at all even if it would leave me a lot more desk room. It takes an adjustment in hand-eye coordination to move from paper to tablet, and I found working on a dinky tablet didn't help much. Your mileage may vary however, and any way you end up going, /cheer for amazon's return policy.

I'm hoping to upgrade to an Intuos 4 myself someday (*fingers crossed for financial aid*), but want the much more expensive medium since it makes no sense to me to sacrifice the larger bamboo fun I have for the more reasonably priced small Intuos just for more pressure sensitivity.
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:icondakki-dono:
dakki-dono Featured By Owner Apr 29, 2012  Professional General Artist
Like sparklebox said, go for a Wacom bamboo. The Capture or the Connect would both be fantastic starters.

It took me about 1 week to fully acclimate to my tablet. And now I don't even use a mouse on the computer. I use my tablet for everything! It's made my digital art so much better and faster. Honestly, a tablet (for digital artists) is something that can make your work better. The time it would take to do the same with a mouse is unreasonable. Art is about improvement, and you can improve MUCH faster with a tablet.

It isn't a magic wand that will make your art suddenly amazing---it does take getting used to. Only practice can make your art better. A tablet can help make it better, faster.
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:iconsparklebox:
sparklebox Featured By Owner Apr 29, 2012
Get a wacom bamboo tablet, it's cheap but it's good.
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:iconmidnitehearts:
MidniteHearts Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2012
You should invest in something high quality like a Bamboo Wacom tablet. The cheapest one on Wacom's site is $79. And as for people saying that it takes time to get used to a tablet, that's not really true. It's design to have a "pen on paper feel". so it's basically just like drawing on a sheet of paper with a pencil, except you're doing it on a computer, and have to focus more on looking at the screen. But also keep in mind that getting a tablet won't make you a pro at digital art (lots of artists have this misconception). All it does is make it easier to get your work done. There's lots you need to know when tackling digital art such as color, how to blend your colors, composition, various line weight for character outlines. I would first get a grasp on digital art before investing in a tablet. You don't want to waste your money.
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:iconvineris:
Vineris Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
You can buy a tablet for $100. It will be quite decent. You will have to learn how to use it, which is not an easy task at all. While you're saving, look up pencil crayon tutorials. Even with Crayolas, technique is a huge part of how good the picture will look and if you can't learn the techniques for the media you DO have, buying a new medium is only going to result in more disappointment. Pencil crayons are relatively simple to learn compared to digital art.

(This isn't to say that you shouldn't get a tablet until you master pencil crayons. But the techniques aren't going to be easy to learn so get into the habit of improving your knowledge rather than blaming your tools.)
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:iconmichaelmetcalf:
MichaelMetcalf Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2012
An artist buying a tablet is like a songwriter buying a guitar.

It can be expensive and it won't make you better quickly. but if you are willing to put in the time and effort and practice it can enhance your performance.

Your ponies look good. I'd recommend continuing to practice drawing many other types of things with pencils and asking for a wacom bamboo for your next birthday or other gift-giving holiday. In the long run, practice is more important than the tablet and you will eventually need that money for something more pressing.

Only get a tablet if you are serious about art and willing to struggle through a learning phase with it. Quite a few folks buy one, struggle for a day or two and then sell it on ebay or stick it in a closet.

Keep in mind that you will also need art software like photoshop or SAI. I think GIMP might also work with tablets but I am not sure.

Keep up the good work! You're young and you can accomplish anything.
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