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November 26, 2012
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Dodge and Burn tool on Photoshop, can't get away from them... :(

:icondraconicparagon:
DraconicParagon Featured By Owner Nov 26, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I am really trying to bust out of my art box and better my digital pieces by creating those AWESOME realistic looking lighting effects but the only thing I have learned how to do is use the Burn and Dodge tool to add light/3-D-ism to my stuff. I know there is a better way I just haven't quite found the right tutorial on how to do better! Any tips?
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:iconrynkadraws:
RynkaDraws Featured By Owner Nov 30, 2012  Student Digital Artist
My advice is to study from real photos by color picking at first, just to get the feel of how colors and light are supposed to act in certain situations.
The dodge and burn tool have a downside to them is that they always over-saturate your paintings, and thus are to be used only when the painting is almost complete to be less noticeable. Dodge also drags your colors towards yellow-orange and burn towards red-purplish. In a case where you don't want your light/shadow to have those colors, this is really harmful.
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:icondraconicparagon:
DraconicParagon Featured By Owner Nov 30, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thank you for the advice!
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:iconbluewyrm:
Bluewyrm Featured By Owner Nov 29, 2012
[link] Best shading tutorial I've come across yet, hands down.

Honestly, just looking at your gallery I wouldn't have known you were using dodge/burn on most of the pieces :)

I personally use a pallette (I've currently got one from an outside source, but I'm going to make my own pretty soon) with a wide variety of hues, saturations, and brightnesses sorted in color gradients from one to the other; which dumbs down the color selection porcess a bit and makes it more efficient.
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:icondraconicparagon:
DraconicParagon Featured By Owner Nov 29, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thank you! This is very helpful!
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:iconshininginthedarkness:
It took me a good couple pictures to even start to get the hang of shading with cool colors, but it's been totally worth it.
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:icondraconicparagon:
DraconicParagon Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thanks! I will have to just keep on practicing! :D
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:iconpuppy-dangerous:
puppy-dangerous Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
Yeah, you do it with the paintbrush tool and your chosen setting. I personally like the airbrush. On regular setting. Just the color and your opacity.

Really, what you need to do is go get some paints or oil crayons or colored pencils or whatever, sit down and do some stuff on paper. Without your digital tools, you'll have to learn the technique. Which you then apply in your art program.
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:icondraconicparagon:
DraconicParagon Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yeah, I have done several acrylic paintings of alien landscapes and such but I get frustrated when I can't achieve those small thin lines that I can digitally. Thanks for the tip!
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:iconpuppy-dangerous:
puppy-dangerous Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
lol that's why I don't do that much traditional work any more, aside from abstract sketches.
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:iconappledeer:
AppleDeer Featured By Owner Nov 26, 2012  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
Well, honestly, I tend to shade backwards >>; Fill a multiply layer with a pastel/tint color and add white or a white/yellow where I don't want the shadows.
I'll be happy to show you if you like, though I'm no good at tutorials XD
Main thing to remember is color theory. :3
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