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November 17, 2012
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How do you avoid your paint overlapping ?

:iconmythicsonofgod:
MYTHICSONOFGOD Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Hello everyone I am a newbie at digital art.

I am trying to begin learning to shade a sphere with a tablet and pressure.

But I noticed that my lines are overlapping and the effect is lost (it looks awful), how do you avoid colors overlapping?.

Here is a picture on what I am talking about
[link]

[link]

thank you for your time.
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:iconnarutokunobessed:
narutokunobessed Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2012  Student General Artist
Its mostly looks like your playing with the opacity. Its overlapping because your overlapping opacity. Opacity is how transparent your color is. But the more you add to opacity, the more you get less transparent.

Keep on layering, or try with full opacity instead.
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:icontetchist:
Tetchist Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
you ask it really nicely to please knock it off
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:iconbluewyrm:
Bluewyrm Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2012
When shading: First, turn on size-pressure link and opacity-pressure. Use a very, very low master opacity - on the top bar (I like about 5-8%, use lower for farther-apart colors and higher for closer together ones) and try to cover the whole area you want to change with each stroke (don't lift!!!) then a little less of that area where it's supposed to be changing repeat repeat repeat. After it's pretty close to what you want, use alt+tap to select inbetween colors and then smooth out. (Even before you do that, it usually looks ok though [link] )

I can be clarify if you like :)
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:iconself-epidemic:
Self-Epidemic Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
just keep overlaying it till you get the colour you want. <:
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:iconendave:
endave Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
+1 Like

More advice like this please :)
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:iconself-epidemic:
Self-Epidemic Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
You can fuck off now.
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:icontetchist:
Tetchist Featured By Owner Nov 19, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
lolwut
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:iconendave:
endave Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
<3
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:iconkafine:
kafine Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2012   General Artist
That'll happen, you have to work with it.

Instead of trying to paint light by adding vertical strokes in the direction of the light, paint the lit surface of the sphere by making your brushstrokes follow its roundness. This way you can use the "grain" caused by the interacting brushstrokes to make the gradient as the light fades off down the sphere.

[link] See hpw the strokes follow the 3d shape of the sphere along the edge of the light, instead of plunging through it?

I hope that makes sense.
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:iconachipps:
achipps Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
It looks like you are following a MGI Photosuite geek. With MGI Photosuite they don't have a soft edge brush like Gimp or Photoshop. They only have a hard edge.

I can see your problem.

You need to select an round area, fill it with color. Then use a soft edge brush that is made for blending. You use a brush the same size as the circle and make a bright spot where you want the light to hit the ball. Then half that size to shade around the edge, then half that and make the shadow area darker.

You never brush from the bright spot moving away from it. The bright spot is just a spot. You make the spot then go around that spot with less flow.
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