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November 12, 2012
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Looking for some how to step by step full paintings to do

:iconblackrosekane89:
Blackrosekane89 Featured By Owner Nov 12, 2012  Professional General Artist
I'm looking for tutorials, but not speed painting, time lapse videos or anything like that. I'm looking for a step by step guide to painting a full picture like you would find in a how to draw book. A written tutorial would be awesome. Have you used any that were helpful? Thanks!
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:iconendave:
endave Featured By Owner Nov 13, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
There isn't an all in one video that or tutorial that shows all these things you are seeking. What brushes to use is subjective. 5 different artists could use 5 different brushes and achieve the same effect. You really just need to practice and see what works for you. As far as some of the other more technical details of applying colors over grayscale images or effects in general, you could watch Feng Zhu's channel on youtube [link]. He talks through the entire process and helps build a basic art foundation that most of us beginner lack.

Start searching DA for tutorials, check youtube and most importantly practice. With time you will build your own style and tools.
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:iconalantherobot:
AlanTheRobot Featured By Owner Nov 12, 2012
The most step by step i see is something like the portrait drawing link someone gave you.

Usually if i do a tutorial or when others to tutorials they talk about techniques. In digital (and traditional painting, perhaps not drawing) it's hard to replicate all the settings that somebody used and all the strokes used to paint. You might try searching for walkthroughs. That's the closest you'll get and some artists explain each step. I find it kind or tedious and leave people to infer or ask what I did when I post walkthroughs. Most of the time I improvise while drawing so I have to go back, remember what I did. Sometimes I paint out of order. That's why people do videos more. They remember what they were doing and can explain it. Some time lapse videos also have the artist talking more in depth than anything I've ever read/scene. Maybe you only found the ones with music that don't explain? Here's a few that do (they're hard to find). Ignore this if it's really not what you want, but I suggest you at least take a look at the bolded on.

[link] [link] He talks through his thoughts but not in the speedpaints.
[link] This guy is very detailed, go here, make a layer, but has few videos. This one is subtitled/not talked: [link]
But my favorite is this channel: [link] Lots and lots of videos. I think they're all talked through and it goes from sketching to painting to color theory, etc.
I've seen magazines that do step by step, but usually with more graphics oriented stuff. And they feel like this way or the highway when it's not. Or they'll be really good magazines that discuss technique.

If what you're actually looking for is less technique, more how to use a program I'd suggest something else. Or if what you're struggling with is what to do first? Which layer to start on? Do you just want to finish a painting? I would have different suggestions for all those. What is it you want to learn or achieve exactly?
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:iconblackrosekane89:
Blackrosekane89 Featured By Owner Nov 12, 2012  Professional General Artist
Sorry to reply twice, but I wanna explain a bit more. I know how to blend colors for shading and stuff like, what I need is for example which brushses, settings, should I use? What tools do I use to blend? Which brushes for eye lashes? How people have portrait done in full grey and change the tint and add colors in a single step? I know what details/shading are needed to add to make something look realistic, I just need how I go about adding those things with the tools in PS or PSP.
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:iconalantherobot:
AlanTheRobot Featured By Owner Nov 13, 2012
You meant Photoshop or Paint Shop Pro right? I thought you meant Photoshop and I didn't know what PSP was until I read the description in your painting. I use mostly Photoshop, so sorry if some of the things don't apply, hopefully you have it too. Otherwise can't help with techniques in Corel programs. Don't like Corel Painter (the one I tried, don't know if PSP is similar) at all. Confuses the hell out of me.
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:iconblackrosekane89:
Blackrosekane89 Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2012  Professional General Artist
It's ok, I've watched many tutorials now, and 99% of the tutorials for photoshop work for PSP. I have Corel Painter and I hate it lol. PSP works pretty for me, it's fairly similiar to photoshop. Thanks for all of your help!
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:iconalantherobot:
AlanTheRobot Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2012
No problem.
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:iconalantherobot:
AlanTheRobot Featured By Owner Nov 13, 2012
I saw both your replies.

You should look for Photoshop tutorials then. Search deviant art for blending tutorials, coloring tutorials. Did you go to that bolded link? I'm sure they have a video about brushes.

I can provide a little insight/help, but for visuals you'll have to search. If you're a bit confused by the brush settings, where they are, I explain the important ones in my photoshop tutorial here: [link] . For other stuff, if you go to my favorites here [link] I favorited the most helpful tutorials I've seen. There's quite a few on colors and blending.

Some tips:
- Use the hard round brush for everything at first. You can do almost everything with it. You only need other brushes for special circumstances (extra smoothness, textures, etc). Don't use the fuzzy ones at all. And do not touch the smudge tool. From your painting, it looks like you did. About 70% of the artists I really like use almost only variations of the hard brush.
- The size will depend on how big your canvas is. I don't touch the brush flow, but I use 60-70% opacity for setting down colors and a bit of blending, than I lower to 30% for blending the rest.
- In the brush settings for this first part of laying down colors and blending I have shape dynamics checked (size jitter=0 and controlled by pen)(I'm assuming you have a tablet) which makes the brush pointy. But I set the minimum diameter up a bit. 50% or so. I also have transfer checked (opacity jitter=0, controlled by pen) and again I bump up the minimum a bit because we already set the brush to a low opacity in the other top toolbar.
- For hard details (eye lashes, hair, etc) I will uncheck transfer. Make the brush really pointy and again use anything from 70-100% opacity.
- I'll then use any special rough brushes for textures etc. I made a small guide to brushes a long time ago [link] if you want to see it. My technique has changed a bit to the above though. For hair I still use the "toothpaste" brush from that tutorial.

As for how to actually blend, I can't quite tell if you used all smudge tool or if you sampled a bit with a really small brush. 99% of the artists I like I see use the sampling method (also called alt or color picker method) to blend. It might seem really hard and time consuming but that's how it is. [link] Here's a really short tutorial on the basics.

About getting a full gray portrait to color... it has to do with making a layer (or folder) and setting the blending style to overlay or something similar. It's a real pain. I still can't do it very well. It's very very hard to get the colors saturated right. Concept art is often done first in B&W than colored and you'll often notice the paintings seem a bit dull and faded.

I know these tutorials on it:
[link] (Warning, a bit NSFW, naked women... if that bothers you, but it's the method you're looking for.)
[link] (less painting more cell shading style)
[link] (might help with color issues)

I highly recommend you paint in color from the beginning at first. It might seem simpler to add colors later, but it's not.

Hope that helps. Feel free to ask anything else :)
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:iconblackrosekane89:
Blackrosekane89 Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2012  Professional General Artist
Thank you so so much for all of the info! Just one last question. I just saw your response (I just saw your response a few minutes about working with color first). I tried the greyscale method last night and I quite liked working in the grey scale first. Working so much with graphite I had an easier time drawing with the greyscale.

This is how I stacked my initial layers with the grey scale

Lineart
Highlights
shadow
Greybase

And when I wanted to add color, I put a color layer underneath lineart, changed the blending mode to color, had a low opacity of about 15-20 and started adding the color.

This is how it came out, although I royally effed up one of the layers and couldn't undo, and It didn't end up coming out as well as it should've, I like the face, neck and wing (I totally botched the horns). it's only my second painting, I'll be more careful next time lol.

I was wondering if you knew how this guy is adding color? Any idea? It's about 2:08 into the video. [link]
His colors are so dark dramatic.
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:iconalantherobot:
AlanTheRobot Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2012
Maybe since you're so used to gray scale it's easier for you. I do lots of portraits and getting face tones right (the pictures usually have normal light not extreme blue or something) is really hard with gray scale first, at least for me. If it works for you, than great. I mean the colors look good and vibrant in your painting.

He says he did the colors with a brush. So that probably means he merged the image or had it on one layer. With a normal brush he added the white base for the fire, than he changed the brush to red and the brush blending mode (not the layer blending mode) to overlay or something similar, and added the colors. This works well with things like fire and long stretches were you don't have to pick up the brush, or you do have to pick up the brush but the highlights are in small separate places (scales, horns). I know this method exists but it works poorly for portraits for me as picking up the brush and laying it down again would double overlay a color.

That could also have been done with a serious of overlay layers, each multiplying and getting the color under it brighter and brighter.

He could have also just done a normal layer on top of everything with really bright colors (although by what I see when he does the fire that's not the case).

I only took a quick look. The person who did it posted a link to the real time drawing in the description. You should be able to see exactly what settings he touched and layers he used.
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:iconendave:
endave Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Great links! I am on a favoriting spree ;)
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