Shop Mobile More Submit  Join Login

Details

Closed to new replies
November 6, 2012
Link

Statistics

Replies: 50

Wacom Tablets

:iconkurtislauwereys:
KurtisLauwereys Featured By Owner Nov 6, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
Hi there,

I'm looking at getting either a Bamboo or Intuos tablet in the next few days and I'm not sure which one is the best for a beginner? I have Windows and not a Mac (not sure if that matters), and I want to get it to do digital fantasy art.

The cheaper the better obviously, but I'd like to have an active area larger than 6x4 if possible.
Reply

You can no longer comment on this thread as it was closed due to no activity for a month.

Devious Comments

:iconjatomlinson:
jatomlinson Featured By Owner Nov 14, 2012
Cheap = Free. I'm actually giving away two free Wacom Bamboo Pen and Touch tablets. The contest starts at midnight and goes for the next 30 days! [link]
Reply
:iconmichel-le-fou:
Michel-le-fou Featured By Owner Nov 13, 2012  Professional Writer
OUt my way Bamboo tablets run very high, but that is due to import tariff. I thought about them seriously before buying my Genius or INGenious. As they are for traditional art, I wonder how to make my drawings more life-like.
Reply
:iconim-promptu:
im-promptu Featured By Owner Nov 10, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Bamboo, they're available in around A4 sized tablet, I've found it works pretty well. Mine is on the verge of breaking though, so I'm considering getting an intuos when it does because I'm sure that I want to keep drawing digital art. Bamboo is good for experimenting when you're just starting with digital but not sure. ^^
Reply
:iconkurtislauwereys:
KurtisLauwereys Featured By Owner Nov 10, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
I'm just starting so I went with a Bamboo splash, and once I feel a need to upgrade I'll upgrade to an Intuos probably, or maybe even a Cintiq.
Reply
:iconcorvalian:
Corvalian Featured By Owner Nov 9, 2012
I think the Bamboo tablets are Wacom's budget tablets. I used to have an old "Graphire3" tablet from them that I got for around $100 (Graphire I think was the model that Bamboo replaced) and it worked just fine for what I did back then. It'd probably be fine for what I do now, too, as a matter of fact. It didn't have much surface area though, so that was my main reason for replacing it.

I've had an Intuos 4 for a few years now and I haven't had any complaints really with the tablet itself. Wacom software and drivers have been somewhat of another issue sometimes though, but still better than anyone else out there to my knowledge.

The more expensive the tablet, the more bells and whistles it'll have, and I'm not really sure how much I really need them since I'm not exactly creating masterpieces yet. I mean, my tablet was advertised as having something like a bajillion levels of pressure sensitivity or something, which I guess means it can make a cleaner stroke, but I never noticed much difference. It also came with a bunch of extra nibs like textured ones to simulate graphite/charcoal, regular plastic ones, soft ones for markers or something I guess, and a springy one for a paint brush feel. I've tried all of them, but for the most part I didn't really prefer any of them over the normal/black/plastic ones. The texture nibs seemed cool at first, but they wear down the surface of your tablet faster. This doesn't have any effect on the performance of the tablet that I've noticed, but the texture is less noticeable as it gets more worn, making such nibs somewhat pointless.

The best extra "bells and whistles" feature though are the buttons on the side. You can set them up how you want, (push this for brush tool, this for hand tool, etc.) which was cool at first. However, as someone who uses his tablet for school shit a lot, I'd end up having to set up these preferences every time I went to a different computer on campus. I gave up after awhile and decided to get used to the default settings or just use the keyboard.

The circle/wheel on this side is pretty cool too, and a godsend for someone who likes to rotate the canvas while they draw. The canvas rotation setting for it doesn't work in all programs though, unfortunately. I've only gotten it to work in the newer versions of Photoshop CS (CS5 and 6, possibly 2,3 & 4 as well but I haven't tried them. I know for a fact it doesn't work in CS1 and earlier though) as it seems to be tied to the canvas rotate tool (hotkey R in Photoshop I think?) which wasn't around in earlier versions and doesn't exist/work the same way in Corel Painter and GIMP. So it's kind of another one of those things that should only be a deciding factor based on what software you use with it.

Lastly, I have had some issues with newer Wacom drivers screwing up the pressure sensitivity in Photoshop, making it spotty. I'm not sure if it's Adobe or Wacom that caused this, and it didn't seem to be a problem for all users, but it was annoying and I had to rollback to an earlier driver.


TL;DR: the Intuos is nice, but it's more expensive and you may not end up utilizing most or all of its extra features. Depending on what software you're going to use with the tablet and if you think you'll end up using it with different computers a lot, the Bamboo may be the better choice.
Reply
:iconkurtislauwereys:
KurtisLauwereys Featured By Owner Nov 10, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
I decided to go with a Bamboo actually, for now, and if I feel a need to upgrade I'll upgrade later. I got the Bamboo splash, it looks fun. I just need to wait for it in the mail. :(
Reply
:iconcorvalian:
Corvalian Featured By Owner Nov 10, 2012
Cool, you probably made the right choice. :thumbsup:
Reply
:iconkurtislauwereys:
KurtisLauwereys Featured By Owner Nov 11, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
Thanks! I think I did. It's better to start cheap in case I hate it. :P
Reply
:iconxelda57:
xelda57 Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2012
I use a Wacom Bamboo Splash Pen Tablet. It's only about $70 and it comes with an amazing drawing software. I really like it and highly recommend it.
Reply
:iconkurtislauwereys:
KurtisLauwereys Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
What does it come with?
Reply
:iconxelda57:
xelda57 Featured By Owner Nov 9, 2012
It's called ArtRage Studio.
It also comes with Sketchbook Express and a rather simple little drawing program- I can't remember the name, but it's like a drawing version of Notepad.
I usually use ArtRage, though, and I find it great. It has a lot of advanced features, and I don't even have the Pro version XD
Reply
:iconkurtislauwereys:
KurtisLauwereys Featured By Owner Nov 9, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
I bought the Splash so I'm excited. Should arrive in a few days in the mail. :)
Reply
:iconxelda57:
xelda57 Featured By Owner Nov 9, 2012
Cool! I hope you like it! :D
Reply
:iconkurtislauwereys:
KurtisLauwereys Featured By Owner Nov 9, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
Thanks! Me to! :D
Reply
:iconheminder:
heminder Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2012  Professional
To be honest, it depends on your screen size. If you have a big(ger) screen then I'd go for the Intuos Medium. Bamboo is a good sized tablet for most screens and most purposes. Plus it's handy to carry on the go with a laptop, so if you're a beginner and not wanting to spend a lot Bamboo is fine.

Personally I don't recommend getting touch versions. The reason being that the new textured surface wears down the pen nibs really fast and Wacom charges a fortune for new nibs. Tape a sheet of acetate over the surface and the nib-wear problem goes away, but I don't think you'll be able to use touch features that way - so might as well not spend extra on touch features in the first place.
Reply
:iconkurtislauwereys:
KurtisLauwereys Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
I have a 14" screen so yeah, the Bamboo will probably be good enough. :P

I don't want a touch version, I'm fine with the normal one. Do the nibs wear down quickly on all versions or just the touch version?
Reply
:iconheminder:
heminder Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2012  Professional
Yeah it's with all new tablets, both touch and pen. The touch is worse because when the drawing surface itself wears down, you have to send it back to Wacom to replace it, whereas for the pen you can buy sheets and repair yourself. I recommend fixing an acetate sheet from the get-go anyway, that results in near zero wear and won't void warranty.

The old Intuos 3 and the very early Bamboos had a normal surface, but they don't make them any more. All the new models with the "paper texture" wear down nibs real fast. One little sketch would cause it to become completely flat on that side, like a pencil.
Reply
:iconkurtislauwereys:
KurtisLauwereys Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
Huh.. wow. I'll have to look for acetate then. I found some on a few different art websites and was wondering if the thickness of the sheets matters?
Reply
:iconheminder:
heminder Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2012  Professional
Nah not really. I went into my local office/art shop and bought a single sheet of the thickest size they had - about as thick as cereal box packaging. Cost me 20 cents.

I figured a thicker sheet would flex less as I drew on it. This one doesn't flex at all.
Reply
:iconkurtislauwereys:
KurtisLauwereys Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
Okie. I decided to get the Splash so I'm gonna order that online and also get the paper from Michaels. I think I'm also going to order some extra nibs from Amazon just in case.. :P
Reply
:iconheminder:
heminder Featured By Owner Nov 9, 2012  Professional
Cool.
The tablets comes with a few spare nibs.
Reply
:iconkurtislauwereys:
KurtisLauwereys Featured By Owner Nov 9, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
Yay! Which nibs does it use?
Reply
(1 Reply)
:icondeviantartspeedfreak:
deviantartspeedfreak Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2012
Bamboo Pen & Touch is cool, but i didnt used touch feature much since i have all shortcuts on my g15 keyboard, so if you have shortcuts on your kb too, you can be fine with just bamboo Pen, i even found drawing area was too big for me and my ankle hurts like hell after a few hours of using, so i downsized the drawing area to very small size! Now i prefer intuos since it has button illumination and i work mostly in the dark, also the scroll wheel for layers is cool feature on it!
Reply
:iconkurtislauwereys:
KurtisLauwereys Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
I don't need the touch feature tbh, I just need the pen to be able to draw nicely. :P

I'm used to Photoshop so the shortcuts won't be an issue, and I'll be able to pick up on the shortcuts for SAI and Gimp quickly so I'm not too concerned about that either. I work on a laptop with a light over it, so even though my room is dark I can still see the keys. :P

Thanks for the tips though! I used a larger Intuos before and it also cramped up my wrist, it was annoying. :(
Reply
:iconmattcombsart:
MattCombsArt Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2012
the bamboo is just fine to start out with. then in a year you can upgrade to an intuos if your still are into it. active areas dont really matter since you can zoom in when needed.
Reply
:iconkurtislauwereys:
KurtisLauwereys Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
Okay thanks! :)
Reply
:iconcjpalermo:
CJPalermo Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
for me, i started with bamboo... the reason is, I still cant afford an intuos...
Reply
:iconkurtislauwereys:
KurtisLauwereys Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
Yeah, I'm thinking I may do the same. I can afford Intuos but a lot of people told me to start with Bamboo because I've never done digital before.
Reply
:iconkurtislauwereys:
KurtisLauwereys Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
Yeah, none of the Bamboo's break $200. I've just heard mixed reviews with half the people saying start cheap and others saying get the Intuos if I can afford it, which I'm probably going to do. I hope they go on sale sometime soon.
Reply
:iconshobonimaster:
shobonimaster Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I'd start cheaper to see if you like it first.
Reply
:iconkurtislauwereys:
KurtisLauwereys Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
Hmm, okay. I guess that's a good idea.
Reply
:iconshobonimaster:
shobonimaster Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
4x6 seemed a little small to me too, but once I actually started using it it worked out fine.
Reply
:iconkurtislauwereys:
KurtisLauwereys Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
Hmm, okie. Is there any real difference between the three that are 4x6? I checked out the specs on Wacom.com but they all look the same so I don't know why one costs more than the other two.
Reply
:iconshobonimaster:
shobonimaster Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I think the other two have less function keys on them and come with less software. The Capture is the most expensive out of the lower-end ones and has four programmable buttons and some really cool software included in the box.
Reply
:iconkurtislauwereys:
KurtisLauwereys Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
I'm debating between the capture and the splash. I think I may just go for the splash because it's cheaper and I already have Photoshop CS6, can use Gimp and can get SAI for free. Those seem like the three best programs for digital art anyway, so the pre-loaded software doesn't seem too important.
Reply
:iconshobonimaster:
shobonimaster Featured By Owner Nov 9, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Make sure you look at the specs real close.
Reply
(1 Reply)
:iconraiinysummer:
raiinysummer Featured By Owner Nov 6, 2012
Honestly I don't think the active area matters. I've always used a bamboo pen tablet, the cheapest one that I'm aware of. It's worked out well for me. I've had the opportunity to use Intuos tablets, but I don't think there's any significant difference.

Since when I draw, I just zoom in and zoom out of the image, and I've never felt a large active area was necessary.
Reply
:iconoxfordtweed:
OxfordTweed Featured By Owner Nov 10, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I think this can depend on the sort of artwork one does. For digital paintings, it probably doesn't matter, but when I'm trying to do lineart I prefer a much bigger active area. Especially for the long, sweeping lines.
Reply
:iconraiinysummer:
raiinysummer Featured By Owner Nov 10, 2012
Even with long, sweeping lines, I find it easier to just minimize the canvas size. The line is cleaner and smoother that way, for me O: I think in the end, it all comes down to personal preference.
Reply
:iconkurtislauwereys:
KurtisLauwereys Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
That's cool. I might not get a larger one then and just go with the cheap $80 one. I wanted the medium intuos5 medium but meh, not a big deal.
Reply
:iconshobonimaster:
shobonimaster Featured By Owner Nov 6, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
From what I saw when I picked up my Bamboo Capture your going to get into heavy money if you want a bigger one.
Reply
:iconkurtislauwereys:
KurtisLauwereys Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
I'd like to keep it under or around $350, so I'm thinking I may get the Intuos5 medium.
Reply
:iconshobonimaster:
shobonimaster Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
If that's you budget you should be find getting something then, I payed $100 for my Bamboo Capture, and I think the the more expensive ones there didn't even break $200.
Reply
:iconkurtislauwereys:
KurtisLauwereys Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
I failed at hitting the reply button, lol. Check the top comment :P
Reply
Add a Comment: